California’s War on Plastic

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California's War on Plastic

by baldilocks

[cap­tion id=“attachment_112378” align=“alignright” width=“300”] I keep a stash of contraband.[/caption]

Shoot­ing blanks as usual; hit­ting the aver­age Californian.

The state has out­lawed or restricted single-​use plas­tic bags, plas­tic drink­ing straws, and plas­tic cut­lery. Future tar­gets: plas­tic deter­gent bot­tles, unat­tached caps on plas­tic bot­tles, and poly­styrene con­tain­ers (typ­i­cally used to hold restau­rant take­out orders), which more than 100 Cal­i­for­nia cities have already banned. Some leg­is­la­tors also want to ban travel-​size sham­poo bot­tles that hotels pro­vide for guests.

Golden State con­sumers are schlep­ping gro­ceries in their arms as if they’ve been sent back­ward to the pre-​bag era, suck­ing on paper straws that quickly become sod­den and use­less, and smug­gling plas­tic bags across the state line. Some Cal­i­for­ni­ans even take their own steel straws into restau­rants. (snip)

Virtue-​signaling flour­ishes in such an envi­ron­ment. Shop­pers flaunt their reusable bags (which might carry dis­ease), big busi­ness parades its green cre­den­tials, and law­mak­ers seek the approval of like-​minded thinkers by enact­ing bans. Then-​governor Jerry Brown acknowl­edged that “plas­tic has helped advance inno­va­tion in our soci­ety” when he signed the plas­tic straw ban last year. Then he scolded res­i­dents for our “infat­u­a­tion with single-​use con­ve­nience,” which has “led to dis­as­trous con­se­quences.” (snip)

The idea that plas­tic con­sumer goods cause a good deal of global pol­lu­tion dri­ves much of this reg­u­la­tion and pro­hi­bi­tion. “Plas­tics, in all forms — straws, bot­tles, pack­ag­ing, bags, etc. — are chok­ing the planet,” Brown said at his bill sign­ing. (snip)

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch has become a ral­ly­ing point for envi­ron­men­tal­ists, but it’s made up mostly of lost fish­ing gear, “not plas­tic bot­tles or pack­ag­ing,” National Geo­graphic reports. (snip)

Almost none of the plas­tic in the oceans comes from Cal­i­for­nia. An analy­sis by Germany’s Hemholtz Cen­tre for Envi­ron­men­tal Research found that roughly 90 per­cent of ocean plas­tic enters the ocean via ten rivers — eight in Asia and two in Africa. Only about 1 per­cent of all plas­tic in the oceans is from the U.S.; California’s “con­tri­bu­tion” to the mess is negligible.

But “we” can’t expect all those not-​white peo­ple to stop throw­ing their crap into the ocean!

Any­way, the arti­cle goes on to men­tion an already-​existing solu­tion: a microbe that devours plastic.

Has some­one informed all those ille­gal aliens being dumped in sanc­tu­ary cities that they should leave their plas­tic at home? Not that it would make any dif­fer­ence. They’ve already vio­lated the law.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Fol­low her on Face­book, Twit­ter, MeWe, and Gab.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar or hit Juliette’s!

by baldilocks

I keep a stash of contraband.

Shooting blanks as usual; hitting the average Californian.

The state has outlawed or restricted single-use plastic bags, plastic drinking straws, and plastic cutlery. Future targets: plastic detergent bottles, unattached caps on plastic bottles, and polystyrene containers (typically used to hold restaurant takeout orders), which more than 100 California cities have already banned. Some legislators also want to ban travel-size shampoo bottles that hotels provide for guests.

Golden State consumers are schlepping groceries in their arms as if they’ve been sent backward to the pre-bag era, sucking on paper straws that quickly become sodden and useless, and smuggling plastic bags across the state line. Some Californians even take their own steel straws into restaurants. (snip)

Virtue-signaling flourishes in such an environment. Shoppers flaunt their reusable bags (which might carry disease), big business parades its green credentials, and lawmakers seek the approval of like-minded thinkers by enacting bans. Then-governor Jerry Brown acknowledged that “plastic has helped advance innovation in our society” when he signed the plastic straw ban last year. Then he scolded residents for our “infatuation with single-use convenience,” which has “led to disastrous consequences.” (snip)

The idea that plastic consumer goods cause a good deal of global pollution drives much of this regulation and prohibition. “Plastics, in all forms—straws, bottles, packaging, bags, etc.—are choking the planet,” Brown said at his bill signing. (snip)

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch has become a rallying point for environmentalists, but it’s made up mostly of lost fishing gear, “not plastic bottles or packaging,” National Geographic reports. (snip)

Almost none of the plastic in the oceans comes from California. An analysis by Germany’s Hemholtz Centre for Environmental Research found that roughly 90 percent of ocean plastic enters the ocean via ten rivers—eight in Asia and two in Africa. Only about 1 percent of all plastic in the oceans is from the U.S.; California’s “contribution” to the mess is negligible.

But “we” can’t expect all those not-white people to stop throwing their crap into the ocean!

Anyway, the article goes on to mention an already-existing solution: a microbe that devours plastic.

Has someone informed all those illegal aliens being dumped in sanctuary cities that they should leave their plastic at home? Not that it would make any difference. They’ve already violated the law.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, MeWe, and Gab.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar or hit Juliette’s!