A Slice of CA Voter Fraud Pie

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A Slice of CA Voter Fraud Pie

[cap­tion id=“attachment_113300” align=“aligncenter” width=“300”] The hand on the left looks like mine, but, unfor­tu­nately, it isn’t.[/caption]

by baldilocks

I know you’re not shocked about this.

An indict­ment unsealed in Los Ange­les charged nine peo­ple accused of par­tic­i­pat­ing in vot­ing fraud schemes — in which home­less peo­ple were allegedly offered cash or cig­a­rettes in exchange for forged sig­na­tures on ini­tia­tive peti­tions and voter reg­is­tra­tion forms. (…)

Pros­e­cu­tors have accused the group of 14 felonies for a vari­ety of alleged acts dur­ing the 2016 and 2018 elec­tion cycles, includ­ing charges of cir­cu­lat­ing an ini­tia­tive with forged or fic­ti­tious names, sign­ing fic­ti­tious names, reg­is­ter­ing fic­ti­tious per­sons, and mak­ing pay­ment for sig­na­tures, accord­ing to the indictment.

That this was only just reported a year ago indi­cates that it has prob­a­bly been going on for years, if not decades. And, since a sig­nif­i­cant por­tion of on-​the-​street home­less are addicted to some sub­stance or another, this was a black mar­ket wait­ing to happen.

Cal­i­for­nia, thy name is voter fraud, judi­cial nul­li­fi­ca­tion and shady trans­ac­tions, high and low.

Dur­ing the period when I was with­out a vehi­cle – 2014 to 2017 – I was reg­u­larly approached by per­sons with ini­tia­tive peti­tions at bus/​train stops, sans offers of money or smokes.

At first, I’d tell them “no, thanks.” But it got inter­est­ing when I began ask­ing the peti­tioner about the issue he/​she was hawk­ing. Most could tell me noth­ing about the issue for which my sig­na­ture was needed and moved away from me quickly — after all, the pick­ings were fat and, mostly, less annoy­ing than yours truly.

One peti­tioner was hon­est enough to say that he knew noth­ing about the issue at hand and was just doing his job. I almost signed because of that.

From the 2018 report embed­ded in the one above:

Paid sig­na­ture gath­er­ing com­pa­nies, that can charge $2 or more per sig­na­ture depend­ing on the polit­i­cal cam­paign, said they often con­tract with mul­ti­ple com­pa­nies, that in turn hire or con­tract with tem­po­rary work­ers to cir­cu­late the petitions.

They said a small per­cent­age of sig­na­tures sub­mit­ted later turn out to be false or forged but it was nearly impos­si­ble to iden­tify those responsible.

It’s a safe bet that there’s a sim­i­lar and much more lucra­tive pay-​for-​signature/​registration black mar­ket among Spanish-​speaking and other ille­gal alien enclaves and that the mar­ket is antic­i­pat­ing expansion.

Is the pic­ture becom­ing clearer as to why the Demo­c­rat Party wants to keep our bor­ders non-​existent?

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng has been blog­ging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here. She pub­lished her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Fol­low her on Face­book, Twit­ter, MeWe, and Social Quod­verum.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar or hit Juliette’s!

The hand on the left looks like mine, but, unfortunately, it isn’t.

by baldilocks

I know you’re not shocked about this.

An indictment unsealed in Los Angeles charged nine people accused of participating in voting fraud schemes — in which homeless people were allegedly offered cash or cigarettes in exchange for forged signatures on initiative petitions and voter registration forms. (…)

Prosecutors have accused the group of 14 felonies for a variety of alleged acts during the 2016 and 2018 election cycles, including charges of circulating an initiative with forged or fictitious names, signing fictitious names, registering fictitious persons, and making payment for signatures, according to the indictment.

That this was only just reported a year ago indicates that it has probably been going on for years, if not decades. And, since a significant portion of on-the-street homeless are addicted to some substance or another, this was a black market waiting to happen.

California, thy name is voter fraud, judicial nullification and shady transactions, high and low.

During the period when I was without a vehicle – 2014 to 2017 – I was regularly approached by persons with initiative petitions at bus/train stops, sans offers of money or smokes.

At first, I’d tell them “no, thanks.” But it got interesting when I began asking the petitioner about the issue he/she was hawking. Most could tell me nothing about the issue for which my signature was needed and moved away from me quickly — after all, the pickings were fat and, mostly, less annoying than yours truly.

One petitioner was honest enough to say that he knew nothing about the issue at hand and was just doing his job. I almost signed because of that.

From the 2018 report embedded in the one above:

Paid signature gathering companies, that can charge $2 or more per signature depending on the political campaign, said they often contract with multiple companies, that in turn hire or contract with temporary workers to circulate the petitions.

They said a small percentage of signatures submitted later turn out to be false or forged but it was nearly impossible to identify those responsible.

It’s a safe bet that there’s a similar and much more lucrative pay-for-signature/registration black market among Spanish-speaking and other illegal alien enclaves and that the market is anticipating expansion.

Is the picture becoming clearer as to why the Democrat Party wants to keep our borders non-existent?

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Follow her on FacebookTwitterMeWeand Social Quodverum.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar or hit Juliette’s!