Abortion: It’s a Matter of Ownership

See the source image

Hell No, We Won’t Repent

by baldilocks

My friend, Dave Perkins, gets to the heart of the matter when it comes to the attitudes of women who have had an abortion.

I’ve known several women who have told me they’ve had abortions. There are two life responses I’ve observed.

One is an abiding sense of guilt and shame […] at least until they found God and Christ and forgiveness (that is the context in which I have had these discussions with them). Somewhere in their souls they know they are objectively guilty in this, and only God can forgive such acts. So, they seek Him and find Him and find forgiveness.

The other is a FURIOUS ANGER at anyone they believe might possibly be entertaining a tiny bit of anything like judgmentalism against them for having done that. (…)

They don’t seek forgiveness; they want JUSTIFICATION and will punch in the face anyone who won’t acknowledge their act was not unjust.

(…) Not wanting to face something so horrible about yourself is a very strong motive for activism and high loud moral outrage, folks. Don’t undervalue that.

This second kind of person pops up all over the Kavanaugh travesty.

It’s difficult to face the fact that you have murdered, and that the victim is the one person over whom you have total control. If you refuse to face it, that person loses sentience in you mind and becomes just a clump of cells, like your fingernails or your hair.

But there’s more to this phenomenon than the non-personing of unborn babies. The refusal to see the reality of one’s iniquities leads to blindness of the spiritual variety. This blindness seems to turn what is obviously murder into an issue of power.

For the women who justify abortion, the notion that her body is not her own is infuriating. “My body, my choice” is more than just a statement of personal sovereignty; it’s a statement which refutes God’s ownership of each individual.

It’s not a coincidence that many abortion activists are atheists, or they subscribe to a caricature of “God” – a god who let’s them do whatever they want. I think that latter god is real. Some call him Lucifer.

And whoever may act to not allow them to do whatever they want – or even those whose speak out against what they want – is deemed as evil. So it is that, any tactic used against this enemy is fair game.

The repeated attacks on Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh sit atop this twisted spiritual foundation, a foundation made of death to the innocent. Christine Blasey-Ford even admitted this.

Thus is the fruit of the refusal to repent.

One more thing. Here’s how I know that this spirit is from the Adversary — besides the fact that it involves murder. The activists want every level of society to be complicit in the abortion industry, starting at the level of the money in your pocket.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

Follow Juliette on FacebookTwitterMeWePatreon and Social Quodverum.

Hit Da Tech Guy Blog’s Tip Jar !

Or hit Juliette’s!

The other opioid crisis

After many years of back and knee pain, I got a prescription for hydrocodone from my doctor.

I rarely use the pills—about once or twice a month—but the government overreaction to the opioid crisis has left me and others feeling like crack addicts.

I used to get 30 pills every six months. But new government and insurance regulations force me to make an appointment every two months. That costs me $20 per session.

I have to provide a urine sample every time I see the doctor, who agrees that the restraints are extremely silly for people who don’t abuse their medication.

But my complaints about overreaction are far less serious than those who need pain relief.

The Washington Post wrote an excellent story—yes, that Washington Post—about how the opioid “crisis” has created massive problems for people who use pain drugs legally.

The news organization provided the story of Hank Skinner, 79, of Alexandria, Va., who has had seven shoulder surgeries, lung cancer, open-heart surgery, a blown-out knee, and lifelong complications from a clubfoot. He has a fentanyl patch on his belly to treat his chronic shoulder pain. He replaces the patch every three days, supplementing the slow-release fentanyl with pills containing hydrocodone.

“But to the Skinners’ dismay, Hank is now going through what is known as a forced taper. That’s when a chronic pain patient has to switch to a lower dosage of medication. His doctor, Hank says, has cut his fentanyl dosage by 50 percent — and Hank’s not happy about it. He already struggles to sleep through the night, as Carol can attest,” The Post reported.

Tami Mark, senior director of RTI International, a North Carolina think tank, said the changes in drug prescriptions might be a serious mistake. She has conducted one of the few formal studies of forced programs to cut back on legal prescriptions.

“This national effort at ‘de-prescribing’ is again being undertaken with limited research on how best to taper people off opioid medications,” Mark told The Post. “You can’t just cut off the spigot of a highly addictive medication that rewires your brain in complex ways and not anticipate negative public health consequences.”

The opioid “crisis” is a classic example of how government underreacts to a problem and then overreacts to it, leaving people angry and confused. These people—like me—aren’t drug addicts or criminals. They’re people with pain who were just following a doctor’s orders.

What’s more valuable? A Mass or a McDonald Meal

A few days ago I went to my old parish St. Anthony of Padua in Fitchburg for morning mass rather than my current parish. As I was looking at the parish bulletin I was shocked to see the weekday masses all empty in terms of intentions.

It is a simple fact of life, or death, that masses for the souls in purgatory are rather efficacious, but what is less known is that masses for the living are infinitely more valuable.

For one thing the soul in purgatory has already been judged and while a mass might shorten one’s time in purgatory every soul there will eventually be in heaven, that fact is of infinite comfort to the church suffering.

However for the souls still on earth, the church militant, the stakes are much higher.

The souls still on earth fate are still in doubt, the battle for their ultimate fate is raging, and in many cases the combatants the guardian angles of these souls are fighting that battle alone. Think about it, how many people who have abandoned the church, or are weak in the faith or have never known the faith simply have nobody praying for them?

And in terms of what it does for the faithful St. Anselm is rather blunt about it

A single Mass offered for oneself during life may be worth more than a thousand celebrated for the same intention after death.

As was Pope Benedict the XV (the Pope Benedict before the last one)

The Holy Mass would be of greater profit if people had it offered in their lifetime, rather than having it celebrated for the relief of their souls after death.

And consider, the offering for a mass is a whole $10, that’ less that you pay for a #2 meal at a McDonald Drive through around here.

So if you’ve got an extra ten spot to spend and you see an empty mass intention on a local church, even if it’s not your own, consider a mass for someone you love, someone you’ve been praying for, or someone you know that needs prayer. Or if you’re having a hard time even for yourself.

The church is chock full of graces for those who need it, leap at them.