The return of my blog from GoDaddy’s exile is still pretty new and the first thing I’ve noticed is the drop in daily traffic, illustrated by the graphic above.  In the world of the internet being away for a week can have a crippling effect  It’s going to take a while for the people who stopped by daily to discover I’m back and for bloggers to figure out there is something to link to again.  That’s been the most discouraging part of the entire exercise.  I still remain amazed at the level of indifference to my situation, particularly from the people I spoke to vs those I chatted with, but when your ratings as an employee are measured by raw stats vs actual customer satisfaction it’s not a surprise.  In the 7 contacts I had with the GoDaddy people I encountered a single person who conveyed to me the idea that they really wanted to get me back up and running, but apparently such efforts risk the ire of others who might be forced into effort and thus are not popular.

I’m going to find a company to whom my business, small as it is, means something.


This is actually a good parallel to a piece that ran in Powerline about the attempt of a San Francisco van rental company to get local police to show an interest in one of their stolen vans that they, the van company, accidentally came across and followed it until it parked within sight of a police station.  The story is told in a series of tweets by the van company owner.  The unwillingness of police to get involved, even to the point of just standing near them when they confronted the thieves, is a great example of the same issue as the GoDaddy Business.  Why take a risk in violating the strict protocols imposed by the liberal city fathers when such violations can risk a solid job with a good pension?  Much easier to make the people you are supposedly tasked with serving and protecting jump through hoops instead.

The story elicited this comment from one of their readers who moved to SF from the liberal bastion of Boston:

I moved to the Bay area 18 months ago from Boston… In the past 18 months I have had my car broken into (laptop, other items stolen) and then in December our home was burgularized.. The police response to the car breakin was pathetic… I called them after coming back to my car and finding my window smashed (10 minutes, car parked on a busy street 7:00am rush hour traffic) and their response was “fill out a report online”… When our home was burgularized we again called the police; they showed up a day and a half after we called… at that point we had put the house back togehter and were going to send someone to fingerprint the window where they accessed the house… 3 days later after being told they were coming (calls at 4:00am) no one showed. The police report still hasn’t been sent to us; the paperwork they were using still has Kamala Harris listed as AG and my taxes are OUT OF CONTROL. I hope to be part of the mass exit in the next 24 – 36 months. If you’re contemplating moving to San Francisco… Don’t. Don’t do it.

Not many things will pierce the liberal bubble for people.  But this type of thing will.


I didn’t hear about the latest school shooting until I was driving home from work in the wee hours of the morning and the context I heard it from was Steve Kerr’s rant about the NRA.  We keep hearing a lot from a lot of celebrities blaming the NRA every single time there is a shooting, even though the shooters never seem to be an NRA members.  However there are a few people who actually gets what’s going on:

If you think it’s bad now, just wait until the generation whose babysitter is an iPhone is in high school.  You can hardly walk around Wal Mart these days without tripping over a toddler in a trance staring at a screen.

The high school kids who shot rifle in school in 1985 were taught right and wrong.  They were taught what to do with their rifle in school, and what not to do.  If they got out of line, all the other students and the coach would have come down on them hard.  There were no safe spaces, and that was a good thing.

Culture is a powerful force for good.  When good behavior is normalized and deviant destructive behavior is ostracized, shamed and marginalized, you get more good behavior.

That’s J. Christian Adams at PJ media as he talks about the fact that thirty years ago you had gun clubs in schools and somehow you didn’t have mass shootings. I wonder why?  Perhaps the teachers are afraid of being thought judgmental if they bring up such facts.


This actually brought to mind Valentine’s Day/Ash Wednesday.  Yesterday the wife ended up going to mass at our parish school where our Pastor celebrated Mass for the students and got our Ashes.  A few hours later I got to work and noticed something missing.  20 years ago I would have expected to see at least a half dozen such people at my workplace and plenty in the public during the day wearing ashes.  Forty years ago the majority of the people around me would have been wearing ashes that day, but at work that day there wasn’t a single other person with ashes on their head and only a couple of people on the shift recognized what the ashes were.  Several came up to me to tell me I had a stain on my head (in fairness one of them was an Iraqi who likely isn’t familiar with Christianity).   On that very same day I listened as an otherwise sensible young lady insist to another that Mike Pence wanted to put lesbians like her in concentration camps  and pooh poohing my calling out such insanity.

CK Chesterton famously wrote that modern reformers often rush to do away with things without understanding the purpose they serve  Our friends on the left have spent two generations De-Christianizeing our culture never noting the benefits it produced for the public.  Only now two generations later are people seeing the price this decision carried.  I submit and suggest yesterday’s events in Florida, those events in San Francisco and even my issues with GoDaddy are examples of this cost.


Roger Simon spots another such example of this price as he tells the tale of an incident at an Ivy League University:

Fear of physical contact on the part of students? Where have we heard that before?  Parkland, perhaps?  At least the Florida school had the gumption to throw Cruz out, even if the authorities did not follow up as they should have and averted the carnage. The student — of color or not — who stood up inches from Professor Rosen and yelled “FUCK YOU” should have been thrown out of Princeton that very day never to return.

Princeton — in the current Ivy League tradition — did a bunch of nothing.  First Yale at Halloween, then Dartmouth in its library, now Princeton — our supposedly greatest universities have become our greatest centers of adult abdication, especially on the part of their administrations.  Who will be surprised if violence comes next?

This abdication of adult and, quite often, parental responsibility is rampant in today’s America.  This is not just due to the runaway epidemic of political correctness in our culture and its easy disparagement of traditional values.  It is the Chinese Cultural Revolution-style violence that this behavior engenders.  The Princeton students terrified to defend Professor Rosen in his class were not all that different from the panicked Parkland students fleeing Cruz. The Princetonians were scared for their lives to pipe up.

Why risk getting in trouble by confronting a potentially violent student, particularly one of color, and risk being branded as a hate monger, much easier to cancel the speech, cancel the class and say no more about it, after all you don’t want to risk stemming the flow of the money coming in do you?


There are in fact moments when adults seem to cry enough.  One of those took place when an Oregon school district decided to cancel Valentine’s day

The Bethel School Board’s response is a typical government reaction to finding out people don’t like something they did. Most boards hate hearing criticism and label it “threatening” so they don’t have to continue listening. This is a common tactic used by elected officials to avoid hearing from angry constituents. Some will even go so far as to break state law to avoid hearing from voters. It appears that the Bethel School District may have done just that. The very first rule of the Oregon Open Meetings Act states clearly that all public meetings are to be open to the public and provide accommodations. If there isn’t enough space, the board is responsible for finding space and hearing each citizen’s concern. The Bethel board’s refusal to provide space, even when warned ahead of the meeting that they needed to, could be a violation of state law. Further, attempting to shut down a meeting before public comment has been made is also a violation of state law. Thankfully, the board decided to reschedule the meeting for later in the week in a bigger location, but not before attempting to get away with not naming a new date. The crowd refused to let that happen and forced them to name a date and time. Several parents are still concerned they will change the venue without notice.
 
Contrary to the board’s claims of unruliness and disorder, this meeting was a classic example of democracy in action. Board members tend to forget that they work for the people and a strong reminder is often needed to get them back on track. The parents of the Bethel School District are doing what every American should be doing: holding elected officials accountable for their actions. If parents don’t stand up against the onslaught of anti-Americanism and the destruction of our traditions and culture we will soon have no traditions left.

The real question though is how many of these parents will be showing up on election day to vote these rascals out, or will that be too much trouble?

One of the things that Political correctness does is try to play the risk reward card on people to change their behavior, suggesting that the risk of public opprobrium  for a public action or expression is not worth the reward of free speech or action.  While this is a horrible danger at times it is the source of incredible amusement as illustrated by this

The person who sent out this tweet is an educated citien, here is her twitter profile

Senior Editor & Planetary Evangelist, The Planetary Society. Planetary scientist, writer, public speaker. Writing a book on Curiosity mission. Asteroid 274860.

You know what’s really funny? She doesn’t sound any different from Richard Russell howling against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 and the horror of black and white people attending social events together.

Democrats ever the party of segregation.


I’m still laughing at the official portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama that were unveiled last week. There were in one respect a perfect representation of the pair’s time in office. A lot of hype but not a lot of substance.   While in that regard it’s an amusing diversion he was still the president of the United states and he and the first lady deserve than they got, not for the sake of themselves but for the sake of the office.


One other thing about Valentine’s Day falling on Ash Wednesday.  It’s often forgotten that Valentine’s Day is actually the feast day of St. Valentine who was martyred that day by the Roman Emperor Claudius II

Under the rule of Claudius the Cruel, Rome was involved in many unpopular and bloody campaigns. The emperor had to maintain a strong army, but was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. Claudius believed that Roman men were unwilling to join the army because of their strong attachment to their wives and families.

To get rid of the problem, Claudius banned all marriages and engagements in Rome. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret.

When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Valentine was arrested and dragged before the Prefect of Rome, who condemned him to be beaten to death with clubs and to have his head cut off. The sentence was carried out on February 14, on or about the year 270.

Legend also has it that while in jail, St. Valentine left a farewell note for the jailer’s daughter, who had become his friend, and signed it “From Your Valentine.”

I suspect this Catholic Priest  would have approved Catholics maintaining the Ash Wednesday fast on his feast day.  My solution was to pick up Chinese food after work and eat with dawife after midnight.


Finally CPAC is only a week away and I’ll be there with both of my sons, they’ll be hitting the city while I hit the interview trail and maybe sell a book or two.  If you are going to be there I’d love to see you and if you want to be interviewed contact me and we’ll set up a time.  And don’t forget to ask for a cannoli while they last.


If you’d like to continue to support independent journalism, and help defray the costs of moving this site and the payless week via CPAC please consider hitting DaTipJar here.



Consider subscribing.  If we can get 92 more subscribers at $20 a month I can do this full time without worry.


Choose a Subscription level


Finally might I suggest my book  Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift.

Today is Ash Wednesday and that means that one of my favorite passages in scripture is going to be highlighted:

Even now, says the LORD,
return to me with your whole heart,
with fasting, and weeping, and mourning;
Rend your hearts, not your garments,
and return to the LORD, your God.
For gracious and merciful is he,
slow to anger, rich in kindness,
and relenting in punishment.
Perhaps he will again relent
and leave behind him a blessing,
Offerings and libations
for the LORD, your God.

Blow the trumpet in Zion!
proclaim a fast,
call an assembly;
Gather the people,
notify the congregation;
Assemble the elders,
gather the children
and the infants at the breast;
Let the bridegroom quit his room
and the bride her chamber.
Between the porch and the altar
let the priests, the ministers of the LORD, weep,
And say, “Spare, O LORD, your people,
and make not your heritage a reproach,
with the nations ruling over them!
Why should they say among the peoples,
‘Where is their God?’”

Then the LORD was stirred to concern for his land
and took pity on his people.

If you go to a Catholic Mass today that reading from the book of Joel Chapter  2 verses 12-18 is the first scripture you’ll hear and it emphases one of the most important themes of Christianity and that’s this:

It doesn’t matter how bad your sins have been, how far down the path you’ve gone or what any person thinks of you and your sins. Even now at this very moment God will forgive and forget if you sincerely repent your sins.

Will the path be easy? Probably not, the other side is not going to let you go all that easy, and in modern society if you choose to turn to Christ without a question the Joy Behars of the world will ridicule you.

But in terms of eternity it pays dividends that the world doesn’t offer.

Lent is a time for repentance but in truth the time to take the first step in the right direction is always NOW!

Merry Christmas all

As the snow falls down and I prepare to cook a Christmas Breakfast for my family I leave you today with the Christmas episode of Your Prayer Intentions my show from WQPH 89.3 FM that broadcasts every Saturday at Noon featuring today the entire Christmas Story in Order of it happening rather than each Gospel individually.

To listen click below and remember if you have prayer intentions feel free to send them to me and I’ll be more than happy to pray for them on the show.

May God bless and continue to bless you all on this first day of Christmas

Every time I’m convinced the internet was invented by Satan, it comes up with something that proves how valuable it can be.

My latest experience came earlier this month when, bored by political brouhahas, I started looking up old schoolmates who had dropped out of my life long ago. While searching for someone else, I came upon a blog for alumni of a Detroit Catholic high school that many of my elementary school friends had attended. What blew me away was a post by Dennis, who wrote about serving Mass with Pope John Paul II while stationed in Rome as a Jesuit priest.

Dennis and I spent eight years as classmates at Christ the Good Shepherd School in Lincoln Park, a blue-collar suburb. We weren’t close friends but got along very well even though he was everything I wasn’t: mild-mannered, well-groomed and handsome. The last time I saw him was on a bus in Detroit in 1970, when he was selling encyclopedias door-to-door to put himself through the University of Michigan.

My pastor spent close to two decades working in Vatican City, so after Mass the following Sunday I asked him if he had ever run into Dennis. His eyes opened wide in surprise. He not only knew Dennis but added that he’s now living in a retirement home for Jesuits just about 20 minutes from my place.

I called the facility the next day and was put through to Dennis. After chatting about old times, I invited him out to dinner. What ensued was one of the most fascinating afternoons of my life.

After graduating from college, he taught at a Jesuit-run high school for two years. Inspired by the priests and believing he was called by God, he entered the seminary. His studies took him to Paris, where he entered the diaconate. In fact, he was still only a deacon when he served at a Mass with John Paul the first time.

Ordained in 1984 at the age of 33, he was assigned to the Vatican, where he ultimately spent eight years. (He took a year off to do biblical research and archaeology in Jerusalem.) He got to know the pope a bit – he would never claim they were buddies, but he twice managed to arrange private meetings with John Paul for his parents and younger sister, who had Down syndrome. The pontiff was especially taken with the cheerful and gracious young lady.

Of the many stories Dennis told, my favorite is about the time he served at a Mass with the pope, who customarily had a receiving line after a service. John Paul would greet each server with a handclasp, then move on to the eminences who were in attendance.

When John Paul got to Dennis, he said, “So how is the little one?” For the next five minutes, the powerful church leaders — including the head of the Jesuit order — cooled their heels while Dennis updated the pope on how his sister was doing.

What a life he’s had, living four years in Paris and eight in Rome. He met Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton, and struck up a friendship with Martin Sheen, for whom he served as an informal tour guide when the actor visited Rome. (They became close enough that Dennis spent the Christmas holidays with the Sheens the year his mother died.)

Unfortunately, Dennis’ adventures came to an end in the mid-1990s, when he suffered a massive heart attack that permanently impaired him. While he no longer could work overseas, he recovered enough to resume teaching at the school where he was first drawn to the Jesuits.

Dennis’ flesh may be weak today, but his spirit remains as strong as ever. That the internet enabled me to re-connect with a soul like Dennis gives it partial absolution for its many sins.

Rosary cupcakes a delicious devotion

An argument arose among the disciples about which of them was the greatest. Jesus realized the intention of their hearts and took a child and placed it by his side and said to them, “Whoever receives this child in my name receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me. For the one who is least among all of you is the one who is the greatest.”

Then John said in reply, “Master, we saw someone casting out demons in your name and we tried to prevent him because he does not follow in our company.” Jesus said to him, “Do not prevent him, for whoever is not against you is for you.”

Luke 9:46:50

One of the things that a Catholic sees over the years is an incredible array of different devotion that various people insist IS the devotion you should pray, or that THIS devotion is the one that will finally get your kids or grandkids to church or change the heart of that horrible boss of yours or will bring peace to your friend or finally get the world on the right track.

Then there are all the various prayers and chaplets from the standard Rosary, to the Divine Mercy Chaplet, the St. Michael Chaplet, The Litany of the Saints , the Penitential Psalms and the prayers of various saints.

And beyond that if you go to a divine mercy chapel or to some other place of devotion you will without fail find home made slips with various special prayers that can be prayed on a standard Rosary or various chapelts

In fact I even contributed to this with my own bloggers prayer on my site that went up as soon as my pastor at the time approved it.  It goes like this:

Oh God, you who gave free will to your creation, bless those who use that precious gift to blog

May we though this gift of freedom of expression enlighten, entertain and inform our readers, and we ask particular blessing for those who bring your word across the net, that they may faithfully execute your command to make disciples of all nations.

We ask this  through Christ our Lord, Amen.

This situation is  amplified by 10 if you write about the church, attend Catholic events or go to any national event.  The number of such devotions you are exposed to, involving saints both ancient and modern, miracles long forgotten or new and all kinds of revelations to the point where you realize that not only is God not dead as the left insisted in the sixties but he and the saints still seem to be working overtime for the salvation of souls.

But that leaves the questions on the floor?  Of all of these various devotions:

What are the best ones to pray?

and

Which one are the most likely to be answered?

The answer to both questions is the same: all of them.

In terms of what you should or should not pray, as long as your it is legitimate, unherticial and not forbidden by the Church, ANY prayer, devotion or practice that is the direct worship of God the Father, the Son, or the Holy Spirit or intercessory in nature asking the Blessed Mother or the saints to pray and intercede with God the Father, the Son or the Holy Spirit  either directly, is of value and worth encouraging.

The idea is not so which prayers or devotion you embrace but that you regularly pray bringing your devotions to the Lord and make such prayer habitual.  It is that regular prayer, whether the liturgy of the hours, a daily rosary or regular adoration or whatever devotion you embrace that will bring you closer to God and if you find you are more inclined to one devotion more than another by all means go with it.

My rule of thumb is the best prayer is the one you actually DO.

As for which prayers will be answered the likely hood God answering any prayer is dependent not so much on the prayer used, but on the following:

Your request being in accordance with the will of God.

If what your praying for is contrary to God’s will, it’s just not going to happen.  The desire for God to do our will via prayer rather than the desire of us to accomplish God will through prayer is not only ineffective but is conducive to the Sin of Pride.  If we treat our communication with God like the voice taking your order in a drive through we shouldn’t be surprised if we open the bag after leaving and find something other than what we expected.

Your faith in God’s ability to answer your request.   Presuming your request is in accord with God will faith is still a key ingredient.   Over and over in scripture Jesus notes where faith is the difference between a prayer even by a person “unworthy” (“Lord, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s scraps.” Then he said to her, “For saying this, you may go. The demon has gone out of your daughter.” MK 7:28,29) being granted to a prayer by the worthiest ( Jesus rebuked him and the demon came out of him, and from that hour the boy was cured. Then the disciples approached Jesus in private and said, “Why could we not drive it out?” He said to them, “Because of your little faith. “Mt 17:18-20a ) Just as faith without works is dead, prayer without faith is just words without meaning.  It’s worth noting that a sign of faith in prayer is persistence in prayer.

The disposition of the Target of a prayer.  This is a function of the freedom God provides us as humans.  One of the most common prayers you will run into is someone praying for the conversion to the faith or that someone will find their way to God.  These prayers are of great use and can aid a guardian angel in opening doors and opportunities for such repentance but while our guardian angel is always on the job and God never tires of opening doors that lead to his right hand in the end a person has to be willing to take step however small to seize that opportunity, walk though that door or grasp that hand.  Furthermore we have to remember it’s not WHEN such a thing takes place but THAT such a thing takes place that matters.    So be persistent as the Holy Spirit does the heavy lifting.

So here is my advice:   Pray liberally, wait patiently and have faith that while you might not know what God & the Holy Spirit is doing, he does.

If you’d like to continue to support independent journalism please consider hitting DaTipJar here.



Consider subscribing. While you might have heard I’ve been unexpectedly rehired at my job. how long that will last is anyone’s guess (I have Jan 7th or 8th in the pool) but if we can get 87.5 more subscribers at $20 a month I can do this full time without worry.


Choose a Subscription level


Finally might I suggest my book  Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift for the person of faith on your Christmas list?

In Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court, relying on little more than the majority’s “reasoned judgement” that “liberty” as mentioned in the Fourteenth Amendment somehow encompasses the dignity of same-sex couples, created a right to same-sex marriage. As the case was being deliberated, traditional marriage supporters, including me, were concerned that creating such a right would immediately create tension (to say the least) between this newly-created right and the right to Religious Freedom and Freedom of Speech. In his dissent, Chief Justice Roberts correctly pointed out that “Many good and decent people oppose same-sex marriage as a tenet of faith, and their freedom to exercise religion is—unlike the right imagined by the majority— actually spelled out in the Constitution.” In a separate dissent, Justice Thomas elaborated on what Religious Liberty actually means, pointing out that it “is about freedom of action in matters of religion generally, and the scope of that liberty is directly correlated to the civil restraints placed upon religious practice.” In an apparent attempt to mollify the dissenters, Justice Kennedy explicitly stated in his majority opinion that “Many who deem same-sex marriage to be wrong reach that conclusion based on decent and honorable religious or philosophical premises, and neither they nor their beliefs are disparaged here.” Unfortunately, the LGBT community has done nothing but disparage us and our beliefs since.

Fast-forward two years and we’re back at the Supreme Court for Masterpiece Cakeshop v Colorado Civil Rights Commission, the case where a same-sex couple sued a Christian baker to force him to create a custom cake to celebrate their “wedding.” The baker, Jack Philips, declined to create a custom cake, but offered to sell them anything else in the store. Naturally, the couple cried “discrimination” to the Commission who claimed that Philips not only had to use his creativity and talent to create a cake to celebrate an event to which he was morally opposed, but also had to teach his staff, including members of his family, that his religious beliefs about marriage were discriminatory. The Commission’s ruling blatantly violated both Philips’ right to freely exercise his religion and his freedom of speech, and eventually led to oral arguments at the Supreme Court last week.

I’ve read the transcript of the oral arguments, and while I’m optimistic that Justices Kennedy, Thomas, Alito and Gorsuch, along with the Chief Justice, will rule in favor of Philips, I’m a bit concerned that the ruling may be too narrow to fully protect religious liberty against the same-sex “marriage” onslaught. Much of the argument focused specifically on what aspects of a wedding ceremony counted as “speech” for the purposes of the First Amendment. Trying to draw a line and putting some wedding-related activities, such as cake baking and photography on the protected side and makeup and hairstyling, for example, on the other side, is a complete red herring.

Rather, I believe and hope that the court will take a broader approach to the question of religious liberty that was touched upon by Chief Justice Roberts when he asked whether a Catholic legal aid service could be forced to represent a same-sex couple in a marriage-related case simply because they offered pro bono legal services to the community at large. The question really goes beyond just a wedding. If “decent and honorable” people believe that same-sex marriage is wrong, their “freedom of action in matters of religion generally” demand that they be able to live out their faith.

Christianity teaches that we should treat everyone with love, but it does not demand that we approve of every choice that others make. Why should there be a difference between forcing a baker to create a cake to celebrate a same-sex wedding and forcing a Catholic adoption service to place children with same-sex couples? Why does the same-sex couple’s supposed right to adopt a child supersede a child’s right to have a mother and a father or the Catholic social worker’s right to live out his or her vocation to care for orphans by placing them in healthy family environments?

In either case, the state would be forcing the subject to endorse or facilitate an event or behavior which his sincerely held religious beliefs teach is wrong. It’s really that simple. In either case, the objection is not to the fact that the person is gay. It would be discriminatory if Philips refused to sell the couple a pre-made cake or anything else in the store because they were gay, but that’s not what happened.

The Constitution says there shall be no law prohibiting the free exercise of religion or abridging the freedom of speech. I believe the Court can and should develop a doctrine that allows Christians and other decent and honorable people to avoid endorsing or participating in events or behaviors that their religious beliefs proscribe while still protecting the rights of LGBT persons against discrimination. As Justice Kennedy said in the oral argument, “tolerance is essential in a free society. And tolerance is most meaningful when it’s mutual.”

There is an angle concerning the Roy Moore case that nobody is talking about and that’s the Theological Aspect.

One of the things we are hearing from the Harvey Weinstein left and the Bill Clinton defending media concerning Moore is the hypocrisy of a person who is associated with Christianity in general and the Ten Commandments doing horrible things and then lying about them. How can he do this?

While that statement is rife with irony given that less that 20 months ago they were trying to return Bill Clinton to the White House and worshiping Harvey Weinstein was a God it’s not a bad theological point and deserves an answer, particularly if they actually believe Moore is lying and aren’t looking for a non-democrat to join the ranks of the exposed.

So for the sake of the theological point I’m about to make and to answer the question asked, let’s presume that despite the Harvey Weinstein left and the prevaricating media, that spent decades defending the Clintons and hiding the actions of the predators of the Hollywood and political left, are actually in this case correct about both Moore’s past actions and him lying about them today. If this is in fact the left’s Anders Breivik in terms of sexual harassment how and why would a presumably God-fearing man be so willing to tell such a blatant lie about past since rather than simply admit bad behavior in his younger days that he has gone beyond?

Well assuming that the “God-fearing” part isn’t an act the answer may come from Protestant concept of One Saved Always Saved.

Under this theory, because, as all Christians believe, Jesus Christ died for the sins of all mankind, past present and future (which is how Christ opened the gates of heaven for the righteous who died before he was crucified) once you accept Christ as your savior all your sins, past present and future are forgiven.

Thus if Roy Moore belongs to a denomination that subscribes to this once saved always saved concept (not all Protestant Denominations do) then Moore has no fear of losing heaven by lying past sins or even committing new ones because even a sin of prevarication being committed for the sake personal advancement would already be forgiven, covered by the blood of Christ and of no risk to his eternal salvation. Christ has done the heavy lifting so he can coast.

If Roy Moore was a Catholic of course he wouldn’t have this dodge. The Catholic Church has consistently taught for two thousand years that this is nonsense. Saint Paul himself talks about running the race to keep himself from being disqualified ( 1 Cor 9:2-27) and St John talks about sin that leads to death (1 John 5:16-17), we Catholics call such sins Mortal sins.

For a sin to be Mortal Sin it has to be a question of a grave matter, done deliberately with full understanding that it was wrong.

Furthermore to a Catholic in this case there would be two mortal sins here, the sin of the lie itself and the sin of presumption, that is, committing a mortal sin in anticipation of confessing said sin to be absolved of it.

This is important because for a person to be absolved of sin, they have to have contrition for that sin, either perfect contrition, meaning you hate the sin because of the love of God, or imperfect contrition, meaning you hate the sin because of their fear of damnation (imperfect contrition requires sacramental confession.) If a person is committing a sin with the intention of confessing it after the fact demonstrates a lack of the necessary contrition for forgiveness. After all Jesus himself taught that not all who cry Lord Lord will enter the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 7:21-23).

Now again we don’t know if Roy Moore is telling the truth or lying, and as of this writing I’m still giving him the benefit of he doubt but if he IS lying and figuring it is no big deal because it’s covered by the blood of Christ, believe he has a lot more to worry about than the potential of losing a senate seat.

Closing thought. If he is lying now but later confesses and repents, as Christians we are obliged if asked to forgive the sin. We aren’t however obliged to support his election.

by baldilocks

Many of my Facebook friends – most of whom are conservatives — are arguing about controversies of recent vintage and of this particular day: whether or not to continue watching the NFL, whether Christians should allow their children to take part in Halloween festivities or participate in those festivities themselves. I find it amusing, as I do with most purse fights.

But today is also another anniversary: the 500th anniversary of the day on which Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, signaling, in hindsight, the Protestant Reformation. I put up a short status noting the occasion and received not one bit of blowback from my Catholic friends like Fausta or our host!  Not one bit of purse fight. I’m almost disappointed!

Seriously, I love that noting this event in 2017 is almost mundane, especially since the split between the two parts of Christianity generated lots of bloodshed all those centuries ago and did so for some time in the previous century.

The evolution of this relationship between Catholics and Protestants was exemplified by the fact that, when my great-aunt was alive, I would drop her off for Mass at St. Brigid Catholic Church in South Central LA, continue on to my Protestant non-denominational church in Glendale, then, when my church’s service was over, come back to retrieve her.

Having read a lot about theology and church history, one overarching theme seems inescapable to me – every church denomination is capable of falling into error, division and even violence because we forget these things: that God believes in freedom and that our primary commandments are to love Him and each other. I, for one, don’t want to forget.

God bless the peace between His children and Happy Reformation Day …

And thank you, my Catholic friends, for the love and for the reconciliation.

Also, this seems like a good place to put a link to Peter’s book, The Perfect Protestant and Catholic Prayer.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!