In Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court, relying on little more than the majority’s “reasoned judgement” that “liberty” as mentioned in the Fourteenth Amendment somehow encompasses the dignity of same-sex couples, created a right to same-sex marriage. As the case was being deliberated, traditional marriage supporters, including me, were concerned that creating such a right would immediately create tension (to say the least) between this newly-created right and the right to Religious Freedom and Freedom of Speech. In his dissent, Chief Justice Roberts correctly pointed out that “Many good and decent people oppose same-sex marriage as a tenet of faith, and their freedom to exercise religion is—unlike the right imagined by the majority— actually spelled out in the Constitution.” In a separate dissent, Justice Thomas elaborated on what Religious Liberty actually means, pointing out that it “is about freedom of action in matters of religion generally, and the scope of that liberty is directly correlated to the civil restraints placed upon religious practice.” In an apparent attempt to mollify the dissenters, Justice Kennedy explicitly stated in his majority opinion that “Many who deem same-sex marriage to be wrong reach that conclusion based on decent and honorable religious or philosophical premises, and neither they nor their beliefs are disparaged here.” Unfortunately, the LGBT community has done nothing but disparage us and our beliefs since.

Fast-forward two years and we’re back at the Supreme Court for Masterpiece Cakeshop v Colorado Civil Rights Commission, the case where a same-sex couple sued a Christian baker to force him to create a custom cake to celebrate their “wedding.” The baker, Jack Philips, declined to create a custom cake, but offered to sell them anything else in the store. Naturally, the couple cried “discrimination” to the Commission who claimed that Philips not only had to use his creativity and talent to create a cake to celebrate an event to which he was morally opposed, but also had to teach his staff, including members of his family, that his religious beliefs about marriage were discriminatory. The Commission’s ruling blatantly violated both Philips’ right to freely exercise his religion and his freedom of speech, and eventually led to oral arguments at the Supreme Court last week.

I’ve read the transcript of the oral arguments, and while I’m optimistic that Justices Kennedy, Thomas, Alito and Gorsuch, along with the Chief Justice, will rule in favor of Philips, I’m a bit concerned that the ruling may be too narrow to fully protect religious liberty against the same-sex “marriage” onslaught. Much of the argument focused specifically on what aspects of a wedding ceremony counted as “speech” for the purposes of the First Amendment. Trying to draw a line and putting some wedding-related activities, such as cake baking and photography on the protected side and makeup and hairstyling, for example, on the other side, is a complete red herring.

Rather, I believe and hope that the court will take a broader approach to the question of religious liberty that was touched upon by Chief Justice Roberts when he asked whether a Catholic legal aid service could be forced to represent a same-sex couple in a marriage-related case simply because they offered pro bono legal services to the community at large. The question really goes beyond just a wedding. If “decent and honorable” people believe that same-sex marriage is wrong, their “freedom of action in matters of religion generally” demand that they be able to live out their faith.

Christianity teaches that we should treat everyone with love, but it does not demand that we approve of every choice that others make. Why should there be a difference between forcing a baker to create a cake to celebrate a same-sex wedding and forcing a Catholic adoption service to place children with same-sex couples? Why does the same-sex couple’s supposed right to adopt a child supersede a child’s right to have a mother and a father or the Catholic social worker’s right to live out his or her vocation to care for orphans by placing them in healthy family environments?

In either case, the state would be forcing the subject to endorse or facilitate an event or behavior which his sincerely held religious beliefs teach is wrong. It’s really that simple. In either case, the objection is not to the fact that the person is gay. It would be discriminatory if Philips refused to sell the couple a pre-made cake or anything else in the store because they were gay, but that’s not what happened.

The Constitution says there shall be no law prohibiting the free exercise of religion or abridging the freedom of speech. I believe the Court can and should develop a doctrine that allows Christians and other decent and honorable people to avoid endorsing or participating in events or behaviors that their religious beliefs proscribe while still protecting the rights of LGBT persons against discrimination. As Justice Kennedy said in the oral argument, “tolerance is essential in a free society. And tolerance is most meaningful when it’s mutual.”

While driving down Route 55 in Lagrangeville, New York (about 60 miles north of New York City) on the way to a medical appointment yesterday, I spotted a sign outside of Kelly’s Steaks and Spirits that sure lifted mine! The sign announced that they DO NOT air NFL games in that establishment and the sign further went on to say:

MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN

If I were not driving at the time I would have taken a picture.  I do not have the resources to go out for dinner, but that sign alone (in NEW YORK) is enough reason for me to want to check that place out if the opportunity to dine out should ever present itself to me. Predictably, the Trump Derangement Syndrome afflicting people has caused an outbreak of hatred and poor reviews for this establishment.  At the top of their page, Facebook highlights certain words they think we need to know people are using:

*******

MJ Stevenson, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla at MareZilla.com. She lives in a woodland shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her family and a large pack of guardian companion animals. 

I met Rene Jax last week, and I’m lucky I did. Not many people could be full of good humor after a 24-hour cross-country plane/train/bus trip, but Rene was. That’s all the more remarkable considering that she was in town to talk about “gender identity.”

Not from any academic viewpoint, either: Rene is a transsexual, born male, who underwent “reassignment” surgery in 1990 after living as a woman for more than a decade. She has come to regret that decision, and she’s alarmed at how transsexuality has been “weaponized by the left.”

She has a message she’s willing to travel across the country to deliver. “The debate around sex changes is personal, because I am a transsexual. I literally have flesh and blood in this debate.” She has written about her experiences, but now she’s willing to travel to speak out. Why? “I’m here to be an advocate for our children.” When Rene sees puberty blockers being prescribed for kids, and when she sees teenagers seeking surgery to amputate healthy body parts, she can’t be quiet. She’s funny, and she doesn’t bludgeon anyone with words, but she means business.

Her trip to my corner of the country coincides with a bill in my state capital that would create “gender identity” as a protected class under civil rights law. This follows an executive decision, unilaterally imposed by the state’s Commissioner of Health and Human Services, to add “gender reassignment” to the list of covered services for adults and children alike under Medicaid. (The Commish made his decision effective July 1, a month before a public hearing on the change. He’d rather ask forgiveness than permission, and the governor seems to be indulging him.)

During Rene’s few days here – too few, I might add – she spoke to groups large and small. The largest event was a forum where she was on a panel with a therapist and an attorney, each offering stories and expertise about gender identity and its personal, cultural, and legal implications. All the speakers were excellent. Rene’s talk was the linchpin of the whole thing, though, in my humble opinion.

It takes nerve to talk about personal experience and regrets to a room full of strangers. I respect that. Rene broadened my outlook, and I respect that, too.

Here’s her 20-minute presentation from the forum.

Ellen Kolb is a writer and pro-life activist living in New Hampshire. She blogs at ellenkolb.com and Leaven for the Loaf. 

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by baldilocks

First things: my gratitude to Fausta for filling in for me on Saturday. I still have some computer issues which will be dealt with directly.

Some may remember that one of the first of the gazillion sexual harassment/assault accusations and revelations was from actor Anthony Rapp, who told of being assaulted by actor Kevin Spacey when Rapp was a 14-year-old.

At present, Rapp plays Lt. Paul Stamets on Star Trek: Discovery, a show which, despite my initial skepticism, is excellent so far, rivaling my beloved Deep Space Nine as my favorite Trek. In short,

Rapp as Stamets

Discovery is exciting and fun; Rapp appears to be a fine actor.

To repeat what I said here, I follow the Social Media accounts of some actors whose work I admire and do so with the expectation that they will be liberals/leftists and will, therefore, offer some opinions with which I strongly disagree and Rapp’s political tweets, like that of his co-star Jason Isaacs, I tend to ignore.

But one thing I cannot ignore is the daily harassment received by Rapp due to the revelation. It’s more than abhorrent. Rapp shares almost every one of the messages with his followers and I don’t think that many in my political and spiritual circles are paying much attention to what people like Rapp are experiencing. He’s been getting missives like this one on his Twitter and Instagram accounts for months now.

That’s right. People are harassing Rapp because they thought he had ended House of Cards, a TV show on which Spacey was the star. Spacey was fired after the allegation and Spacey’s apology.

I thought it would be interesting to point out that this is emblematic of why rape and sexual assault victims often don’t come forward.

Rapp is famous and thousands of people follow his account, yet he still gets hundreds of nastygrams from Spacey’s remaining fans. Can you imagine the type of harassment that non-famous people receive when they out a predator?

Rapp and I are not on the same “teams.” He’s gay, I’m straight. I’m a Christian; I don’t know anything about his spiritual beliefs. I’m a conservative; he’s a liberal.

But the team I hope I suit up for is decent human being. And I think most DTGB readers do as well.

This kind of harassment should be outed and the perpetrators should be shamed, if possible.*

I don’t think it is, though.

*I’ve re-thought my position on shame. Some of it is good.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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Everyone knew that whoever let the sadness overtake him would sink into the swamp.

The Neverending Story

It’s now been a year since President Trump’s election and I, for one, think that’s plenty of time for all the tantrums to have played themselves out. I can understand the disappointment of the losing side in the immediate aftermath of the election, and I can even understand how they could imagine that all their worst-case scenarios might actually come to pass, even if some of them were pretty ridiculous. But come on, after a full year of actual results, isn’t it time for the Left to stop pretending that the country is doomed?

I can understand having policy differences with the administration. Heck, I spent eight years disagreeing with the Obama administration on just about everything, so I know what that’s like. But the economy is growing at more than double the rate it was under Obama, the stock market is at record levels, ISIS is actually “on the run” now that the rules of engagement have been changed to let our military do its job, and consumer confidence is higher than it’s been in over 15 years. So, what’s the problem?

The problem is that, rather than actually being afraid that President Trump is going to ruin the country, the left is, and always has been, afraid that Trump really will Make America Great Again. So they will seize on any issue, no matter how small, as long as they can use it to claim that they’ve been right all along. What do the Russian collusion “investigation” – with no evidence having been found to that effect after more than a year of investigating – and the fake news story of President Trump supposedly over-feeding fish in a koi pond in Japan have in common? They can both be used to claim that the president is unfit for office. And then the left claims these as proof that President Trump can’t govern.

Think of how our allies, and especially our enemies see this. No matter what the president tries to do, foreign leaders will see a divided country behind him, and a relentlessly negative press and this considerably weakens our position. Imagine if President Trump could engage a foreign leader with the same kind of press coverage that Obama received. This leader, whether friend or foe, would reasonably conclude that President Trump would likely be in power for the next 7 years and could enact whatever policies he might use to entice/threaten/coerce that leader to do what we want. The options of either ignoring the U.S. or actively antagonizing us would be off the table because they would know – or at least perceive – that President Trump means business and that the country is behind him.

Regardless of how much they try to spin it, it is obvious that Obama left the country in a hole. They tried to convince us that it was “the new normal” and that things just were the way they were and had nothing to do with Obama’s incompetence or socialist tendencies. Even with the relentless negativity, President Trump has, in less than a year of governing, been able to reverse a lot of that “old normal,” and that scares the pants off the left. So, unfortunately, I predict that the whining, crying and fake news will continue for the foreseeable future. But at least we can see it for what it is: a desperate and disingenuous strategy to weaken the president and the country until democrats can get back in power. SAD!

By John Ruberry

If you know a millennial who craves communism, then I suggest that you sit that person down to watch the documentary Karl Marx City by Petra Epperlein and her husband, Michael Tucker, which was released last year. Epperlein was born in 1966 in Karl-Marx-Stadt, East Germany, which is now, as it was before, the city of Chemnitz.

And as it is was when she was a child, the most noticeable feature of her hometown is the giant bust of Karl Marx, which looks over the dwindling population of Chemnitz. Its bulk makes it too expensive to remove from its perch on the former Karl-Marx-Street.

The Marx monument is the ideal metaphor for the former East Germany. Just as Big Brother is always watching in George Orwell’s 1984, the Ministry for State Security, colloquially known as the Stasi, was watching too. Cameras were seemingly in every public space, as were Stasi agents and informants. In a nation of 17 million people, there were an astounding 90,000 Stasi agents aided by 200,000 informants. In contrast, the FBI employs a paltry 35,000.

What was the Stasi looking for? Everything. Just grab whatever information that can be found and use it for a case later. Because not only was everyone a suspect in this worker’s paradise, everyone was probably guilty. And if they weren’t guilty they likely would be soon.

Early in Karl Marx City Eppelein tells us that her father, 57, committed suicide in 1999 after washing his company car and burning his personal papers. Afterwards her family discovers cryptic typed letters anonymously mailed to her father that accused him of being a Stasi informant.

Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia

Shot in black and white, perfect grim communist hues, Epperlein, looking similar to Liv Ullmann’s mute character in Ingmar Bergman’s Persona, in a bit of twisted humor wanders the decrepit and mostly empty streets of the former Karl Marx namesake town holding a massive boom microphone and wearing vintage headphones while we listen to her voiceovers–in contrast to the clandestine recording done by the Stasi.

Epperlein visits the Stasi archives in Chemnitz and Berlin where we see file after file on multiple floors. She’s looking for her father’s file, but we learn that the German Democratic Republic didn’t organize its files in the manner that Google stores information on mainframes where we can instantly retrieve volumes of information on just about anything. Instead there’s something here, there’s something there.

We see a grainy Stasi film of a couple walking on sidewalk. The man picks up an object. Then he puts it down. Why did he do that? Another man picks it up. The object turns out to be a knife. He keeps it. Why?

Epperlein tracks down a childhood friend who was a true-believer in communism. Now she worships trees. Her father, a retired Stasi agent, recounts his regular break-ins at apartments. What was his most common discovery? Handwritten schedules of West German TV shows and small bags containing a tooth brush and other personal hygiene items, just in case the occupants are arrested–or forced to escape to the West.

Many political prisoners were indeed locked up for subversion. Many ended up in the West, but rather than this being an innocent Cold War liberation, we learn they were sold by the workers’ paradise for ransom to the West for much needed hard currency.

The suicide of Epperlein’s father was hardly an anomaly, taking one’s own life in the GDR was common after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Recently Chemnitz had the lowest birthrate of any city in the world.

One of the experts interviewed for the film scorns the Oscar-winning film, The Lives of Others. While Oskar Schindler of Schindler’s List was real, there was no Stasi hero fighting back against oppression.

Near the end we learn the truth about Epperlein’s father.

Karl Marx City is available on Netflix and on Amazon.

John Ruberry, whose wife was born in the Soviet Union, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

There is one thing thing missing the current spate of pervnado stories that surprises me.

For decades are friends in media and culture have existed that the idea of absolute truths as taught by the Catholic Church is incorrect and that truth, right and wrong are completely subjective and that the idea that man is not just another animal but made in the image of God is nonsense.

That being the case can anyone explain why not a single member of the liberal Pervnado crowd is saying:

I know that to Ms. xxx what I did is wrong, but that’s HER truth. In my truth what I did is perfectly fine.

Since we humans are animals and males are biological driven to seek sex how can you consider me wrong for satisfying that biological urge?

If a woman chooses to sexually satisfy me in order to advance her career who are you to object? It’s a simple transaction that gives both parties what they want.

How dare you try to impose the Christian idea that sex outside of marriage is wrong!

What I choose to do behind closed doors to satisfy myself sexually is none of your business!

Could it be that the reason why we are not hearing any of these defenses either from those accused or from those who defend them be that they don’t believe the pap they have been telling us for decades and instead secretly know that Sr. John Dominic is right?

1: Why Educate in Virtue? from Dominican Sisters of Mary on Vimeo.

I submit and suggest that our liberal friends who decided 50 years ago that because they were so much smarter than every generation that came before them it was a good idea for society to abandon the tenets of Judeo christianity that had centuries of trial and error to test their value to humanity for the whole “Morality is subjective and if it feels good do it” were only slightly less idiotic than those is society who didn’t have the guts to tell them to get stuffed when they had the chance.

That’s the sad part, We as a society did this to ourselves and we did so because we still haven’t figured out that God’s rules are not for his benefit, but for ours.


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In most every area of life, there’s a seeming perpetual second fiddle; someone or something that while garnering a certain amount of acclaim is always viewed as the poor man’s version of whoever, or whatever, is the high profile high roller. This happens a lot in music, where an artist in a given genre no matter their skill or accomplishments is usually written off with a “well, he/she/they is/are okay, but he/she/they will never be as good as so-and-so.” Some artists acknowledge this fate; veteran British mellow progressive rockers Barclay James Harvest self-depreciatingly titled one of their songs “Poor Man’s Moody Blues.”

Keeping with the music theme, various instruments also fall into this perpetual silver medalist category. There are many superb pianos out there, but none have the allure of a Steinway; there are many superb violins, but none have the cachet of a Stradivarius. In a more down to earth category, namely the electric guitar, while the Gibson Les Paul is revered and rocked by players great and small, the Gibson SG is usually relegated to the that’s-nice department, often with a “so you couldn’t afford the real thing, huh?” smirk aimed its owners way (a new standard SG costs $1,650 less than a new standard Les Paul).

The SG was born out of, hard though it may be to believe given the Les Paul’s omnipresence, necessity when in the early 1960s Gibson was faced with a dilemma: no one was buying Les Pauls. Some rethinking and reengineering was called for, with the SG being the result. The SG’s body was noticeably thinner than the Les Paul, with some strategically located beveling incorporated for greater player comfort. Away went the maple top on a mahogany body that was the Les Paul’s normal wood selection; instead, the body was all mahogany. The neck was moved further away from the body, allowing easier access to the upper frets although much to Gibson’s chagrin it became rapidly apparent they had gone overboard as the neck-to-body joint was notoriously weak (this was corrected in the mid 1960s). Electronics and hardware were essentially the same, but the SG’s substantially different construction resulted in a somewhat less bright, more rounded tone than the Les Paul along with less sustain. Gibson discontinued making the Les Paul after 1960, introducing the SG in 1961 initially under the Les Paul name. The real Les Paul — yes, Virginia, there was a man named Les Paul who was a monster guitar player and guitar building innovator — was decidedly nonplussed with the new guitar and requested his name be removed from it. Which happened, the guitar being renamed the SG for solid guitar. Apparently no one at Gibson had any naming ideas that week.

Should one be inclined to peruse music video and concert footage from the 1960s, a fair number of SGs will be spotted. Eric Clapton played one boasting, sort of, a psychedelic paint scheme durin his time with Cream. Pete Townshend of The Who routinely played (and demolished) SGs during the late 1960s and early 1970s. However, the Les Paul was rediscovered during the 1960s, leading Gibson to reintroduce it in 1969 at which point the SG was relegated to “and we still make these too” status.

While the Les Paul is synonymous with rock royalty — Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin, Duane Allman, Slash from Guns ‘N Roses, etc etc etc etc etc and a few dozen more etc after that — given how the two guitarists most commonly identified with the SG are Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath and Angus Young of AC/DC, the SG is more commonly associated with underworld pretend deity. Its pointed body tips are oft referred to as “devil’s horns.” Given how the SG is nine times out of ten finished in a medium to dark cherry red, I prefer to think of them as the tips of angel’s wings dipped in the blood of the martyrs. A simultaneously more lofty and sobering identifier.

I own a SG. It’s my favorite guitar to play. With the proper technique you can make it sound good for multiple musical genres, including country, in addition to the blues and rock with which it is normally associated. Does it have the almost unlimited sustain of a Les Paul? No. But it has its own unique, warm sound and you can hold a note for a decent length of time. It’s a dream to play, with low string action and its light weight helping you focus on the music alone rather than wondering if there’s a chiropractor in the house slinging a Les Paul over your shoulder for any length of time suggests.

The SG will never have the panache of a Les Paul. It will never be a status symbol or trophy guitar. Rather, it modestly exists for the sole purpose of enabling music creation.

Which, after all, is the idea behind any musical instrument.

And now the song that we all need when liberals give us their holier than thou BS(Sung to the tune of Dixie)

The Harvey Weinstein Liberal Pervado song or :  Look Away

Oh, Way out West in Hollywood City,
Harvey Weinstein liked ’em oh so pretty
Look away, look away, look away Liberal Land.

For 30 years he set upon ’em,
Promised them roles that led to Oscars,
Look away, look away, look away liberal Land.

But Democrats got millions, Hooray! Hooray!
For progressive causes he came through
He ponied up, so they let him screw.
away, away, so they could do what’s best
look away, look away, What’s one girl more or less?

♫ Planned Parenthood it had a gala
& Harvey was their favorite fella
They Looked away, Looked away Looked away
Liberal Land ♫ 

♫ He sat with Hillary, ole Bill’s striker
next to him, Harvey was a piker
They looked away, looked away looked away
Liberal land 

 So liberal men feared nothing,
Hooray! Hooray!
Old Bill & Harvey got a pass
So Conyers dropped Trou and Franken grabbed ass
All day, all day, without media oversight
They looked away, away, Because they voted right. 

 ♫ So silence was the media rule
As long has Hollywood came through
Look away, look away, look away, media land

  Talk Magazine got Harvey’s adoption
And press they got their own script options
and Looked away! Looked away! Looked away!
media Land.   

  They killed off any story
each day, each day
They kept out of the public eye
The foibles of these liberal guys
Away away, there would not be a peep
No one would say, that these guys were all creeps  

♫ Before them all there was ole Ted
Who left that lady cold and dead
Look away, look away , look away liberal land
To not one was a question posed
(Though they all sat with Charlie Rose)
Look away look away look away liberal land 

♫ Then Trump won the election
No Way! No Way!
And just like that the dam it broke
Where once was silence victims spoke
away away, all of it was exposed
each day, each day another story broke 

 At CBS worked Charlie Rose
Who liked to take off all his clothes
Look away, look away look away liberal land.
At the NYT There was no rush
To part ways with their man Glenn Thrush
Look away look away look away liberal land  

At NBC was Halpren
No way, no way
And once all of the stories blew
We found that everybody knew
All day, all day, The press had no regrets
They dared not say, they had their own secrets 

♫S o when media or libs do lecture
That they stand as all girls protectors
Turn away, turn away, turn away from liberal land
Note they cared not for a women’s plight
With predators checks and votes in sight
Go away, go away go away liberal band 

 ♫ And feminists stayed silent, just say, just say
You tell them all where they can go
If on you they try to impose
Away away, back to their devil den.
Away Away You won’t be fooled again 


I know I left out plenty of liberal donors et/ all from the lyric but this song is already long enough as it is.

By John Ruberry

The Netflix neo-western Longmire has ridden into the sunset after six years. The final season started streaming on the network nine days ago and the results should please its fans. I enjoyed it.

My Da Tech Guy review of the first five seasons of is here.

Walt Longmire (Robert Taylor), a widower, is a sheriff in the fictional county of Absaroka in Wyoming. He and his three deputies patrol an area that is larger than Delaware. While Walt, an old-school lawman who knows the difference between right-and-wrong and who rarely crosses the ethical line, at first glance appears to be an anachronism, he still has the smarts and the brawn to set things straight.

If you haven’t watched Longmire but think you might, I suggest you skip the next paragraph as there are some series spoilers.

At the end of Season Five, Walt’s personal and professional life are in shambles. The smartass mayor of Durant (Eric Lane) wants Longmire to resign, and he gets in a brutal knock-down bar fight with his best friend who has turned into a vigilante, Henry Standing Bear (Lou Diamond Phillips). Henry’s situation gets worse after he is kidnapped by corrupt former Bureau of Indian Affairs police chief Malachi Strand (Graham Greene) and his goons. Walt faces a wrongful death lawsuit from the estate of a businessman who also happened to be the father of one of his deputies and the brother of Longmire’s predecessor as sheriff. (Hey, not many people live in Absaroka County.) Walt’s most trusted deputy Victoria “Vic” Moretti (Katee Sackhoff) is pregnant–no one knows who the father is. And the Native American casino in Absaroka, run by the compromised Jacob Nighthorse (A Martinez), is fostering the crime Walt predicted would result, although I’m pretty sure that he didn’t expect Irish mobsters from Boston being part of it. Walt’s daughter, Cady (Cassidy Freeman) is running a free legal aid clinic on the Cheyenne reservation, but she’s being paid by Nighthorse.

Season Six kicks off a new story thread about a serial bank robber known as “Cowboy Bill.” A stereotypical blogger–who is bearded, overweight, and shoves iPhones into people’s faces while garnering minuscule traffic on his site, causes another headache for Walt when he reports that the sheriff  “ambled in” to the robbed bank long after Cowboy Bill made off with his loot. Of course that infuriates the mayor. As for this blogger, I’m thin, clean-shaven, I own a camcorder, and I have many more hits daily on my blog than that other guy has received in the life of his blog. Da Tech Guy of course crushes the traffic of that fictional blogger’s site too.

Anyway…

John “Lee” Ruberry of Da Tech Guy’s Magnificent Seven

The lawful death lawsuit against Walt begins. Cady continues to face difficulty striking an equilibrium between the law, her ethics, Native American culture, and Nighthorse. As for the casino operator, his juggling act becomes even more difficult, as it does for Walt’s pal Henry. And we learn that the Irish mob doesn’t take “no” for an answer from a Wyoming sheriff.

The series ends with a surprise twist, one that is satisfactory too.

The first three seasons of Longmire ran on A&E, and while the ratings and the critical response were favorable, the network cancelled the show because the demographics favored older viewers. A&E is run by dopes. Thank you Netflix for rescuing the program.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.