Wendy’s recent announcement that it’s installing 1,000 self-service kiosks in its restaurants is a huge counter-salvo against the Fight for $15 and its effort to push through an unreasonable national minimum wage.

Most mainstream economists believe paying America’s youngest and least-skilled workers at least $15 an hour will kill countless jobs, especially for those least able to lose them. But the progressives behind the push, seemingly ignorant about how the economy actually works, claim the wage hike would have few ill effects.

But the Wendy’s plan, plus similar automation ideas being considered by other fast-food chains, puts the lie to that contention. When you force employers to pay workers more than they’re worth, the result is fewer people have jobs.

The battle over the minimum began at the turn of the 20th Century, the dawn of the original Progressive Era . There is, however, a huge difference with how the leftists of yesteryear approached the issue. The original Progressives backed a minimum wage precisely because it would throw people out of work.

As economic historian Thomas C. Leonard explains in Illiberal Reformers (Princeton University Press, 2016), the Progs were a new breed on the national landscape at the end of the 19th Century. Devout believers in science as a cure for every ill, Progressives were convinced the only way America could survive and thrive was if all aspects of society were run by experts — namely themselves.

One of the Progressives’ main concerns was racial purity. They feared that Americans of Anglo-Saxon stock were threatened by hordes of inferior creatures, primarily racial minorities and immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. They concluded that an efficient way to protect the native-born was to drive the undesirables — whom they called “unemployables” — out of the workforce.

The “experts” believed the government had to intervene to prevent white workers’ pay from plummeting to unsustainable levels. They thought blacks and immigrants would accept lower living standards than white men, so they would accept lower wages. The ensuing “race to the bottom” would cut white men out of the job market and leave them unable to raise families.

To that end, the Progressives sought a national minimum wage — or, as they called it even back then, a “living wage” — to make labor so expensive that employers would hire only highly competent workers (i.e., white men).

(The Progressives also wanted women out of the workplace. Not only did they hold jobs that men could do, but the Progs also wanted females at home, breeding and caring for their families for the betterment of the race.)

So what would the “unemployables” do if they were prevented from working? Under the Progs’ plan, some — imbeciles, drunkards, criminals and the disabled — would be institutionalized, while others would be placed in “labor colonies,” a euphemism for work camps. It’s not a stretch to imagine that such places could eventually become concentration camps.

By 1919, fifteen states had minimum wage laws, but the Progressives never got the federal law they wanted. Acts were passed, but the Supreme Court struck them down as unconstitutional because they interfered with employers and workers’ right to enter into free and willing contracts.

Not until Franklin Roosevelt’s administration did Congress approve a law, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, that survived judicial review.

When it comes to the Progressive Era, historians are unfailingly generous in telling how it improved American life by creating better working conditions, establishing food and drug regulations, and reforming the political system. Many also credit the movement for women gaining the right to vote even though most Progressives opposed the idea.

But the dark side of Progressivism is buried and rarely comes to light in the history books. Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism is an excellent antidote that is both enlightening and entertaining. Now we can add Thomas C. Leonard’s Illiberal Reformers to the must-read list for exposing the anti-humanity ideals that formed the core of the Progressive machine.

 

An old lecturer of mine once said that marketing is a combination of art and science. As I delve into the world of internet marketing further, I find what he said to be true. Marketing involves a lot of creativity, but it is also a scientific process. Both creative thinking and data-driven decision making abilities are critically important if you want to be a good internet marketer.

One of the best ways to master these skills – and the other essential abilities every marketing executive must have – is by pursuing an MBA from top names such as Pepperdine University. Today’s best MBA programs are tailored not only to help you master marketing-related skills, but also to allow you to understand the A-to-Z of internet and mobile marketing along the way.

Upon completing the course, you will have a vast new array of knowledge to implement.

 

Find out more about these knowledge and other details about how an MBA can help you be a better marketer from the Anatomy of a Marketing Executive by mbaonline.pepperdine.edu.

Marketing Executive | MBA Online Pepperdine

 

220px-fort_calhoun_power_plant_1Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant, another victim of the anti-nuclear movement

This week, covered up by election coverage, the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant closed down for good. Somewhere, a whole bunch of anti-nuclear activists are cheering. To replace Fort Calhoun, Omaha Power will instead use coal fired plants in Nebraska City, unless of course the future President Clinton shuts down coal, in which case Omaha will just not have enough power.

Fort Calhoun’s problems are just the surface of a growing threat to the future of nuclear energy in America. More nuclear plants are closing, and we aren’t building replacements. The soaring cost of nuclear regulation is piling on to what should be cheap power. The building of nuclear plants requires high level engineering work, something that normally brings in stable, long-term and high paying jobs.

But not anymore. I keep in touch with a headhunter that places nuclear-trained officers (like myself) into jobs after they leave the Navy. He sent a very depressing email to his distribution group, where he declared that he would no longer place officers in the commercial nuclear field:

The promise of cheap power via commercial nuclear was supposed to be its big advantage.  It was once even touted as “too cheap to meter!”  But it is economics that are now killing the industry.  Utilities are deciding it’s less expensive to close plants that are already operating than continue their operation.  Think about that:  it’s more economical to idle billions of dollars worth of existing infrastructure and spend the money to be build new generation facilities.  That’s crazy and a powerful indication of how uncompetitive commercial nuclear power has become.

We at -redacted- believe that strong professional successful Navy Officers should now avoid jobs and careers in commercial nuclear power and are suspending our relationships with our corporate clients in that sector.  If a career in commercial nuclear power is your focus, we will not be a good career transition resource for you.

Recent and future nuclear power plant closings and changes:

  • San Onofre in CA closing
  • Diablo Canyon in CA closing
  • Crystal River in FL closing
  • Vermont Yankee in VT closing
  • Pilgrim in MA closing
  • Kewaunee in WI closing
  • Harris in SC, 2 plants cancelled
  • Levy County in FL shifting from nuclear to natural gas
  • Comanche Peak in TX, 2 plants cancelled
  • Quad Cities in IL closing
  • Clinton in IA closing
  • Oyster Creek in NJ closing
  • And more are coming…

I have a former Naval Officer friend that worked at San Onofre who confirmed all this bad news. She has since left with her husband for a completely different career field.

pm2anuclearpowerplantModular nuclear plant? That’s so 1960’s

Meanwhile, China is rapidly building nuclear capacity, growing their engineering base in the process. Now they have designed a small reactor capable of providing 6 MW of power, enough to power a small island (South China Sea anyone?). Although the media is touting this as an accomplishment, it’s not. The Army built a number of small reactors, the Navy currently operates reactors on its submarines and aircraft carriers, and even the Air Force attempted to make nuclear powered aircraft. And this was back in the 60’s and 70’s. If we had continued investing in nuclear power, we could have closed our dirty coal plants and lowered electricity costs, perhaps enabling us to build the renewable energy sources for long-term electrical generation. Instead, we’re taking a second seat to China.


This post is the opinion of the author and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense, Department of the Navy, or any other government agency.


If you enjoyed this article, check out my blog and perhaps buy my kids book. And, instead of paying 5 dollars for a latte from Starbucks that they’ll use to fund Planned Parenthood, you should consider sending that to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar instead.

Lastly, please say a prayer for all the families of the engineers affected by Fort Calhoun’s shutdown. They now have to find new employment, and it’ll be hard on them for the next few years.

The movement to a nationwide $15 hourly minimum wage rolls right along, no matter what reality commands.

A lot of it has to do with organized labor, where many salary agreements are pegged to the minimum wage. Some of it has to do with “social justice”, where utopian views cloud reality, such as this (emphasis added):

it might take time for employers of many low-skill workers to learn how to economize on their labor costs, but they will over time, since the incentives to do so are much larger – and that would be bad news for the very low-skill workers the higher minimum wage is designed to help. For instance, fast-food workers might be more easily replaced by robots.

Hello, Marta

In the back kitchen of Mountain View’s newest pizzeria, Marta works tirelessly, spreading marinara sauce on uncooked pies. She doesn’t complain, takes no breaks, and has never needed a sick day. She works for free.

Marta also does not require mandated paid leave, payroll tax paperwork, and you don’t need to worry about checking her credit rating or her criminal record, or spend money on marijuana or drug screening.

Why?

Marta is one of two robots working at Zume Pizza, a secretive food delivery startup trying to make a more profitable pizza through machines.

Not only that, Marta can produce 100% consistent quality control, which includes “an artisanal touch,”

“We created her to spread your sauce perfectly, but not too perfectly, so the pizza still looks like an artisan product,” Garden said.

And to appeal to people like me, who would love a taco truck on Monday, a gyro truck on Tuesday, and a pastrami on rye truck on Wednesday (emphasis added),

In August, Zume wants to start cooking its pizzas in the startup’s patented delivery trucks. Each truck has 56 ovens that can be turned on and off remotely. Garden can barely contain his excitement for what comes next: “The robots will load all these individual ovens with different menu items. Then the truck will circle the neighborhood. At precisely 3 minutes and 15 seconds before arriving at the customer’s location, the cloud commands the oven to turn on and–” Garden made the symbol of a large explosion emanating from his brain– “BOOM, the customer gets a fresh, out-the-oven pizza delivered to their door.”

Zume’s fresh Lucky Bueno pizza, “a spicy pie with roasted garlic, Calabrian chili and soppressata”, delivered to your house for $18. Count me in!

There’s a basic economics lesson behind all of this.

The thing is, unless you have hands-on experience in the real business world, odds are, the lesson is lost on you.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S, and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.

Haven’t done an “Under the Fedora” piece for a while so here goes.

The Difference between a national story and a local story is illustrated in Minneapolis:

A woman was sexually assaulted by a group of four men and a teenager while walking along a south Minneapolis street Saturday evening, according to a safety advisory issued by Minneapolis police.

The victim was walking in the Lyndale neighborhood around 9 p.m. when a car full of men called her over to their vehicle. They spoke briefly and she continued walking, police said.

A short time later, the five men returned and approached her on foot. They forced the woman to go to an area near 32nd Street and Blaisdell Avenue S., where they sexually assaulted her, police said.

Now this is definitely a local story and not a national one, why because of this sentence

Police released the following descriptions for the five, all identified as Somalis, with dark complexions.

Yup nothing to see here USA move along.

Over at Stacy McCain’s site there is a story about another alleged rape:

Nor are people thinking about what they are doing in the real world in an age where everybody’s cellphone has a video camera, where anything a guy does in his dating relationships may become the subject of an online rant by an angry ex-girlfriend, where a guy meets a girl at a party and has what seems to him a consensual hookup only to discover, nearly two years later, that she’s telling the world that he’s a rapist.

Rosie’s account of that night is a classic “he-said/she-said” situation. Her story of that (allegedly) “horrific” June 2014 encounter seems entirely plausible, and Jason Lee Weight’s (alleged) behavior is indefensible. Rosie says she filed a report with police “a long time after” this encounter, but a lack of evidence made prosecution impossible.

But his main point is more cultural in terms of a warning to young men who do their thinking below the waist.

What you need me for is to explain the meaning of “crazy.” If a guy meets a girl at a party, how does he know if she’s crazy? Well, if he says “let’s go back to my place” and she says “yes,” that’s probably a sign she’s crazy. No sane girl would say yes to such an invitation. The dude might have herpes. He might be a rapist.

She barely knows this guy and she’s leaving the party with him? Crazy. Then she goes back to his place, goes to his bedroom, takes off all her clothes and thinks he’s not going to have sex with her? Crazy.

This is what I’ve explained to my sons. There is a direct correlation between (a) a woman’s willingness to engage in casual sex, and (b) a woman being crazy. As a general rule, the quicker she drops her pants, the crazier she is. Every guy is prone to believe that his own personal charm suffices to explain why this woman he just met is willing to leave the party with him for a quick hookup. “He shoots! He scores!”

Yeah, he’s a natural-born winner. The ladies can’t resist him.

That’s what he’s telling himself anyway, as he blazes past the flashing yellow lights and warning signs: “CAUTION: CRAZY WOMAN.”

The Greeks called it hubris, this arrogance that leads a man to destruction.

My father’s “if she’s good enough to sleep with, she’s good enough to marry.”

Speaking of this topic yesterday I attended one of the national rallies to defund planned parenthood  parenthood,  and for the first time in Fitchburg we had a number of counter protesters, mostly Bernie Sanders fans, who had signs calling for free condoms etc.

As a pair of them were leaving, both college age women they passed by me closes and shouted how they would be having a ton of abortions.

It occurs to me that these are the woman that the Pump and Dump crowd that Stacy McCain has referred to are counting on and in a very few years we might see one of them on feminist tumbler making the same charges that Rosie did.

As I said many years ago:

In short men.  It’s been a long fight but the sexual revolution is over…

….We WON!

While our friends on the left insist that men not have to pay a price to enjoy the favors of a woman, there are some thing that they believe deserve swift punishment:

Ciccotta first encountered trouble at Bucknell when, as president of the College Republicans, he invited Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on campus.

The visit from Yiannopoulos, whose tour of US campuses has caused easily-offended leftwing students to organize therapy sessions in his wake, led to panic from Bucknell administrators and faculty, who organized a range of bizarre restrictions on the event.

The college Republicans were prohibited from filming the talk, and students were not allowed to ask Milo any questions verbally — they had to be scribbled on the back of index cards. Yiannopoulos was also prohibited from speaking to students one-on-one after the event and was escorted out of the building by campus officials as soon as his talk concluded.

After organizing the event, Ciccotta faced a backlash from Bucknell’s faculty. After suggesting, in a private meeting, that the event with Milo had been Bucknell’s “best ever,” he was told by the college’s Student Media Advisor that his attitude would “isolate” the people who worked under him at the college’s radio station.

He was later threatened with having his position as host of a political talk show on campus taken away over an alleged “conflict of interest.”

After all there is nothing worse than being a conservative.

There are very few things less surprising than conservatives being punished on campus for being conservative, this is one of them via the lonely conservative:

Good grief, thanks to Obamacare health insurance rates have been skyrocketing for years. Instead of leveling out, it’s only going to get worse. That’s coming from the woman who helped the implement the train wreck.

ObamaCare rates will skyrocket next year, according to its former chief. Enrollment is tumbling this year. And a big insurer is quitting most exchanges. That’s what we learned in just the past few days.

Marilyn Tavenner, CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans, revealed that she expects ObamaCare premium hikes “to be higher than we saw previous years,” including last year, which saw double-digit rate increases across the country.

and here is another via Instapundit and Weasel zippers

Gotta love leftist hypocrisy.

Via Investors:

Labor Markets: Hundreds of employees at the University of California at Berkeley are getting schooled in basic economics, as the $15 minimum wage just cost them their jobs. Too bad liberal elites “fighting for $15” don’t get it.

A week after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed the state’s $15 minimum wage boost into law, UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks sent a memo to employees announcing that 500 jobs were getting cut.

Glenn uses he word:  Unexpectedly here I suspect that the same could be used to suggest that most of the leaders of those pushing for a $15 an hour minimum wage have positions that will never be lost because of the wage hike.

People have accused Curt Schilling of many things but there is one change that he have convicted himself out of his own mouth affairaphobic!

Speaking to Bannon, Schilling said, “I’m not transphobic, I’m not homophobic.” He added, “As long as you’re not sleeping with my wife, I don’t care who you sleep with.”

How DARE Curt Schilling advocating restricting the sexual freedom of people to exclude the choice of having sex with his wife on the trivial grounds that he’s married to her?  But I’m not worried in a few years will have laws on the books that will protect the rights of people who wish to have sex with people outside of their marriage from financial penalties from angry spouses and anyone who things otherwise will be branded as a bigot by the media.

Finally there is an interesting debate at PJ Media concerning a parent who took her kids to Dairy Queen and then immediately threw away her kids ice cream when they failed to thank the person who gave it to them.

I think it’s the mother’s call here but I guarantee you there is a near 0% chance that they will neglect to say “Thank you” on their next ice cream run.

This was kinda fun, maybe we’ll do it again next week.

Who could have seen this coming:

Last week American Apparel, the biggest clothing maker in Los Angeles, said it might outsource the making of some garments to another manufacturer in the U.S., and wiped out about 500 local jobs. The company still employs about 4,000 workers in Southern California.

and it’s not just the big manufacturers who are getting hit

Felix Seo has been making clothes for wholesale in downtown for 30 years. His company, Joompy, used to count giant retailers like Forever 21 among its clients. But as prices have gone up in recent years, he said, those fast-fashion peddlers are no longer giving him orders.

“I used to pay $5 to get this sewn, and now it costs $6.50,” Seo said, holding up a patterned dress. “But my customer doesn’t want to pay that, so I can’t sell it anymore.”

To survive, Seo, 59, said Joompy may have to start importing goods instead of producing them locally. “It will be impossible to make clothes in Los Angeles,” he said.

The Unions of course are saying it’s all greed

“It’s always, ‘Oh woe is me, If I pay minimum wage at this rate I can’t turn a profit,'” said Nativo Lopez, a senior adviser with Hermandad Mexicana, which is helping American Apparel workers unionize.

Of course that would be more believable if the Unions didn’t get exemptions from the minimum wage:

Martinez, a 53-year-old bellhop, has hauled tourists’ luggage across the flagstone plaza of the Sheraton Universal in Studio City for two decades. He said he was excited after the council’s vote to raise the minimum hourly wage at large hotels to $15.37, which he expected to boost his paycheck by 71%.

He soon found out he wouldn’t be getting a raise after all. Under an obscure provision of the city’s wage hike, unionized hotels were granted an exemption allowing them to pay their employees less. The result is that Martinez, who pays $56.50 every month for membership in the hotel workers union Unite Here, now makes less than those doing the same job in non-union workplaces.

“That’s what really makes me mad,” Martinez said. “I just wanted to be treated equal. Don’t exempt us, because we’re the ones paying union dues.”

I’m old enough to remember when Unions didn’t fight for the right to treat their members as 2nd class citizens.

But either way the working poor in LA are discovering that the real minimum wage is always zero.

I wonder if anyone will mention this to Hillary or Bernie?

*******************************************************************

Speaking of minimum wages, the minimum wage for this job is zero unless you choose to hit DaTipJar




Olimometer 2.52

Please consider Subscribing.

If less than 1/3 of 1% of our readers subscribed at $10 a month we’d have the 114.5 subscribers needed to our annual goal all year without solicitation.

Plus of course all subscribers get my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.


Choose a Subscription level



By John Ruberry

1977 was the year that music came out of the concert halls and into the streets; when independent labels sprang out of the woodwork to feed new tastes; when rock music once again became about energy and fun; when the majors’ boardrooms lost control. Suddenly we could do anything. —Liner notes to Streets, a collection of punk singles, 1977.

That snippet comes from Greil Marcus’ “Anarchy in the UK” chapter in The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll. Such as it was nearly forty years ago in Great Britain with punk rock as it is with Donald Trump and the Republican Party.

Do you want proof? Just nine days ago the ultimate GOP insider, Karl Rove, hosted a meeting of Republican governors at the ultimate insider’s hotel, the Willard in Washington, where, the New York Times reported, George W. Bush’s Darth Vader, sitting at the end of a boardroom table, said it was not too late to stop Donald Trump.

Well if it isn’t too late now it will very likely be so by Tuesday night when the Super Tuesday results come in.

Republican politics has escaped the boardroom and it’s not just on the streets, it’s at the home computer keyboard, it’s in the employee cafeteria, and at the check-out line at the local Walmart.

Like the music industry “experts” in the late 1970s, the Republican Party has ignored what its bases really wants. And the base opposes amnesty for illegal immigrants, ObamaCare, and crony capitalism. Despite promises of eliminating the first two, the Republican Party has at best only offered shadow boxing attacks on them. The last one, crony capitalism, is seemingly esoteric, but it’s a cousin of illegal immigration. I mean, why are we bringing in computer and software developers from Asia on H1-B visas? Are there no computer science programs in the United States? Of course there are. But the US Chamber of Commerce and its members, or as Mark Levin calls the group, the US Chamber of Crony Capitalism, is behind this importation of high-paid workers because it knows big corporations will pay these indentured foreigners a lot less than qualified Americans, who often have to train their cheaper replacements.

John "Lee" Ruberry
John “Lee” Ruberry

And it’s not just American tech workers suffering. It’s happening at Disney World too.

And the US Chamber of Crony Capitalism is in bed with Republican Party. How many votes on Election Day come out of it? Maybe a few dozen.

While there are millions of Trump supporters.

And suddenly they can do anything because there is Anarchy in the USA.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

*************************************************************************

For the first times since I lost my job an Stacy McCain lost his Twitter right we’ve had a setback in our quest for $61 to make a living back here at the blog. Yesterday DaTipJar was completely and utterly silent.

Today we’re doing a tad better we’re $12 toward our $61 daily goal with $49 dollars to go in the next 9 hours to get us back on track for the day without denting our current deficit for the year at 21 days and $1335 dollars.

If less than 1% of yesterday’s readers kicked in $10 our goal for the day would be made with ease and to those who already have thank you so much. For those who can’t afford it, don’t worry about it but I do ask you to promote the site.

To those both able and inclined I’d really appreciate it if you’d help us close that gap by hitting DaTipJar.

Olimometer 2.52

Please consider Subscribing. 114.5 more subscribers at $10 a month will get the job done for the year and will get you my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.

Choose a Subscription level
Beanie : $2.00 USD – weekly
Cap : $10.00 USD – monthly
Hat : $20.00 USD – monthly
Fedora : $25.00 USD – monthly
Grand Fedora : $100.00 USD – monthly

Either way thanks for reading and don’t be shy about letting us know what you think. One can’t improve without critique.

By Steve Eggleston

It’s been a few months since I’ve been writing, and the occasion of the 8th anniversary of the beginning of the Great Recession seemed an appropriate time to return to the ranks of the punditry. I jumped into the middle of a Twitter mini-discussion over the part-time portion of the workforce, specifically the apparent paradox of 319,000 more people working part-time for economic reasons on a seasonally adjusted basis last month than in October while 765,000 fewer people were working part-time for economic reasons on a seasonally-adjusted basis (746,000 fewer on a not-seasonally-adjusted basis) last month than in November 2014. Something Charles Franklin said sent me into this particular tangent of comparing the current level of part-time work to the recent past.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics, as part of the Current Population Survey that measures unemployment, estimates the number of people working part-time, both the total number and those working part-time for economic reasons. Indeed, the latter is the last part of the broadest measure of unemployment and underemployment, the U-6 measure. Unlike most portrayals in the press, it is not a measure of part-time, or full-time jobs. Rather, it is the number of people who, at however many jobs they have, are working less than 35 hours per week for part-time status, or at least 35 hours per week for full-time status.

I do have a word of caution on the seasonal adjustment of the part-time measure of employment, especially the economic reason portion. More often than not, a wild swing in one direction is followed by an essentially-equal swing back. The November rise in the number of people working came after drops of 447,000 in September and 269,000 in October.

With that noted, I decided to calculate the percentage of the employed who were working part-time and the percentage who were working part-time due to economic conditions since the current version of the CPS began in 1994:

Part-time

Part-time economic reasons
Click the images for the full-size versions

In short, while things have been improving, there is still quite a ways to go to get back to where we were before the Great Recession on the employment front.

Most people who spend their employment years in the U.S. will never hear of Fatca, the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act. Fatca was enacted in 2010 under the Obama Democrat administration.

However, Fatca affects an estimated eight million American citizens working overseas. As the Wall Street Journal points out (emphasis added) there are compliance costs,

Fatca requires that foreign banks, brokers, insurers and other financial institutions give the U.S. Internal Revenue Service detailed asset and transaction records for any accounts held by Americans, including corporate accounts controlled by American employees. If a firm fails to comply, the IRS can slap it with a 30% withholding tax on transactions originating in the U.S. Facing such risks and compliance costs, many foreign firms have decided it’s easier to dump their American clients.

And forget about overseas business partnerships or future promotions,

American expats in the Fatca age are also less attractive as employees and business partners, as any financial accounts they can access must now be exposed to government scrutiny—not only from the U.S. but potentially also from more than 100 other countries that have signed Fatca-related information-sharing agreements with Washington. Americans up for executive posts in Brazil, Singapore, Switzerland and elsewhere have been asked by their managers to renounce their U.S. citizenship or lose their promotion

Renouncing your citizenship is a momentous decision that is never taken lightly; now it’s also more expensive since the fee went up this year to $2,350 (used to be $450), in addition to exit taxes on current assets.

So the U.S. workforce, currently at its lowest participation rate in 38 years, is facing pressure from all sides, with (among others):

  • The unknown consequences of the TPP, the Trans Pacific Partnership, of which even its staunchest supporters believe will result in job losses in the U.S.,
  • the huge influx of skilled and unskilled labor into the country, including H1B visa workers which may get paid 40% less than the American workers who are forced to train them before they are laid off, as was the case with Disney.

And now, for the millions of Americans who have found overseas employment,

  • Increased financial risks and compliance costs
  • Plus additional government scrutiny, “not only from the U.S. but potentially also from more than 100 other countries that have signed Fatca-related information-sharing agreements”, information which can be used against them by the 100 “other countries,” many of which are not democracies committed to human rights.

But hey, the 8 million Americans living overseas are not here to complain, and the current administration is not interested in a welcoming business environment. It’s just one more instance, as the WSJ put it, of “U.S. tax and regulatory policies that hamper the entire U.S. economy.”

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.

it’s entirely possible.  At least for those of us who are paying attention.

I apologize for my long absence.  I attribute it to PTSD.

The Mayo Clinic describes PTSD as:

Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms may start within three months of a traumatic event, but sometimes symptoms may not appear until years after the event. These symptoms cause significant problems in social or work situations and in relationships.

PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types: intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in thinking and mood, or changes in emotional reactions. source

A traumatic event doesn’t have to originate on the battlefield. I would categorize the re-election of Obama as a traumatic event.  Re-read the symptoms, and tell me they don’t apply to what’s going on in this country.  I’m going to stick to national rather than international events so we’re not too overwhelmed.

We are daily bombarded by bad news and intrusive government.  The millions of people who are out of work with no impending prospects for a job are most certainly suffering a traumatic event.  House foreclosed?  I’d call that pretty traumatic.  How about losing your health insurance or having your rates skyrocket?

People are becoming more reluctant to express an opinion for fear of the politically correct social justice warriors ruining their lives – both economically and socially.

Schools no longer teach children, but instead try to indoctrinate them into a progressive world view.  When they’re not compliant enough, the parents are threatened and coerced into giving them dangerous drugs.  In every case of the recent mass shootings, the perpetrators had been taking psychotropic drugs.

The religious freedoms of Christians are being stomped on by a cabal of atheistic progressives. Less than a week ago, Obama had this to say:

“How do you reconcile the idea of faith being really important to you and you caring a lot about taking faith seriously with the fact that, at least in our democracy and our civic discourse, it seems as if folks who take religion the most seriously sometimes are also those who are suspicious of those not like them?”

“You’ve struggled with the fact that here in the United States, sometimes Christian interpretation seems to posit an ‘us versus them,’ and those are sometimes the loudest voices.” source

Get it?  If you’re a Christian and concerned about the direction the country is taking, you are now labeled “suspicious.”

Every day, we are lied to by the political class with the help of the MSM. Only the most secluded people are not aware the economy is in the toilet.  A trip to the grocery store can be traumatic due to inflation.  I’d call ground beef priced at well over $4.00 per pound traumatic.

Some of us are reacting to what is going on using avoidance:

  • Trying to avoid thinking or talking about the traumatic event.
  • Avoiding places, activities or people that remind you of the traumatic event.

Or these other symptoms from the Mayo clinic:

Negative changes in thinking and mood

Symptoms of negative changes in thinking and mood may include:

  • Negative feelings about yourself or other people.
  • Inability to experience positive emotions.
  • Feeling emotionally numb.
  • Lack of interest in activities you once enjoyed.
  • Hopelessness about the future.

Changes in emotional reactions

Symptoms of changes in emotional reactions (also called arousal symptoms) may include:

  • Irritability, angry outbursts or aggressive behavior.
  • Always being on guard for danger.
  • Self-destructive behavior, such as drinking too much or driving too fast.
  • Trouble concentrating.
  • Trouble sleeping.

Now that I’ve contributed to your PTSD with all this gloom and doom, allow me to make some suggestions.

How to deal with PTSD of this type:

I’m not a doctor, and don’t even play one on TV, but I do have coping skills for you to use.

  1.  Prayer can change your life.  Find some time every day to connect with God.
  2. Take care of yourself.  Eat a balanced diet, go for a walk every day, and get plenty of sleep. If possible, take a short nap in the afternoon.  Get dressed everyday, even if you’re not going anywhere.
  3. Incorporate routine into your day.  Try to go to bed at the same time, and arise at the same time.  Have a daily and weekly schedule, but don’t worry if unforeseen events upset your routine.
  4. If you’re job hunting, make a list of all the places you’d like to work, get dressed in your best interview clothes, and show up.  Ask to speak to the person in charge of the department in which you’d like to work, or the owner of the business if it is a smaller one.  I never, ever got a job by submitting an online application.  One time I showed up at a place that required on-line applications.  The manager liked me and took me into the back room to fill out the application on their computer, and the next day I started work.  Remember, the very worst thing that could happen is they say no.  Go to the next place on the list.
  5. If you’re a stay-at-home mom (the best kind in my opinion), learn how to save money by shopping smart.  There’s a gazillion places on the web to help you.
  6. Find a special friend to share your worries with.  It’s the cheap version of expensive talk therapy.  Don’t forget to help them with their worries.  Helping other people is very therapeutic.
  7. I’m not a big believer in medication for anxiety and stress, and think it should be avoided when possible.  Try some natural remedies.  If things are really spiraling out of control, talk to your doctor before going the drug route.  In some cases it is a necessary path to follow.

And lastly, have faith and hope.  Not the false “hope” that Obama peddled to an unsuspecting public.  Real hope.

Hope is the theological virtue by which we desire the kingdom of heaven and eternal life as our happiness, placing our trust in Christ’s promises and relying not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit.

The virtue of hope responds to the aspiration to happiness which God has placed in the heart of every man; it takes up the hopes that inspire men’s activities and purifies them so as to order them to the Kingdom of heaven; it keeps man from discouragement; it sustains him during times of abandonment; it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude. Buoyed up by hope, he is preserved from selfishness and led to the happiness that flows from charity.

Have a wonderful and holy Sunday.

Adrienne blogs at Adrienne’s Corner combining politics, religion, food, and cats.  Sometimes she even makes sense.

%d bloggers like this: