I made a pilgrimage to the former home and gravesite of two of my favorite rock ‘n’ roll performers: Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison.

Hendrix moved into 23 Brook Street in London in 1968, and two years ago, the bedroom and living room of the home have become a museum. Ironically, the legendary composer George Frideric Handel lived there more than 200 years earlier.

Hendrix, who apparently was delighted to find out that Handel had once lived nearby, insisted he had once seen the composer’s ghost step through the wall, describing the image as “an old guy in a nightshirt and gray pigtail.”

One reviewer noted about Hendrix’s third-floor rooms: “The kitchen was rarely used, with room service supplied by Mr Love’s, the restaurant downstairs, whose waiters carried regular orders of steak and chips, a bottle of Mateus rosé, and 20 cigarettes, up the narrow stairs. Nights were late and noisy, with the flat regularly filled to bursting with whichever musicians had been in that night’s club.”

His former girlfriend, who participated in the design of the museum, reportedly complained that the exhibit was too messy.

fullsizeoutput_604.jpegAfter his years in the U.S. Army, Hendrix was obsessively neat, she recalled. The bed may have been draped in hippyesque fabrics under a canopy made from an embroidered silk shawl but was meticulously made with hospital corners, and the pillows and cushions squared up.

Another room at the museum has a wall of album covers, and an index of the music played on the Bang & Olufsen turntable. Remnants from Hendrix’s own collection included a copy of Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited stained with Hendrix’s blood from cutting his hand on a broken wine glass.

I may have been the only visitor who saw Jimi in concert, which was an amazing performance in 1969 when he played his iconic The Star Spangled Banner.

For more information, see https://handelhendrix.org/

Morrison’s grave in Paris is one of the most frequently visited tombs in the world. Established in 1804 by Napoléon Bonaparte, the Pére-Lachaise Cemetery, where Morrison is buried, contains the remains of celebrated artists, writers, and musicians, including Edith Piaf, Max Ernst, and Oscar Wilde.

Morrison died July 3, 1971, under mysterious circumstances. His girlfriend and an acquaintance quickly arranged for the burial without an autopsy.

For more, see https://www.today.com/popculture/did-jim-morrison-really-die-his-bathtub-2D80555735

As a teenager in a rock ‘n’ roll band, I sang many of Jimi and Jim’s songs. I couldn’t resist a tribute to Morrison, with my rendition of Light My Fire.

See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfrjNYTGaSk

Jimi and Jim could not escape their personal demons, but they left a body of work that endures decades later.

Aren’t leftists the ones always howling about how people to the right of them are “anti-science”? Then how is it that a simple statement about human DNA which is scientifically true caused a man to lose his livelihood? If you guessed that he must have said something about how humans are created as male or female due to biology (and not as a “social construct”), you win.

It all starts on stupid Facebook, where people were commenting about how a male rap celebrity declined to receive a kiss from a male who identifies as female. The rapper, Ginuwine, got himself labelled as “transphobic” for his “hatecrime” of turning down a kiss from someone he is not attracted to. No “#metoo” for him. No defense for refusing advances made by members of a preferred demographic; submit or be destroyed is the rule these days! And no defense for anyone who says otherwise, either!

Enter Will Caligan, disabled war veteran, who committed the terrible thought crime of saying that if you were born male then you are male and that you can’t change DNA. He said this on Facebook. The horror! Predictably, the OUTRAGE!!!! did not take long to erupt along with the demands that he lose his job and be driven from polite society. Of course the mob got its way:

Will Caligan is a Desert Shield and Desert Storm veteran who was an Airborne Counterintelligence Agent who attained the rank of Specialist. He recently lost his job as a comic book creator because of his conservative beliefs.

Caligan decided to express his opinion about a trending news topic. Rapper Ginuwine refused to kiss a transgender person. He commented on his friend’s Facebook wall about his beliefs on the subject.

Caligan told us, “The only thing I put was that DNA was science and of God. That a person could not change their sex no matter what they did. It is a natural construct. In total the statement was only about three sentences long.” You can see above that pretty much sums up what he said.

Despite Caligan’s views being held by many others, that did not stop a witch hunt against him that ended up causing him to lose his job.

The perpetually offended began a campaign on Facebook to harass Caligan’s employer, a comic book company called Short Fuse Media. Will Caligan, alerted his boss to the issue and was initially told not to worry about it, but then the pressure must have gotten to the Short Fuse people because not long after the initial reassurance, Caligan was not only out of a job but also publicly denounced by the company and had been advised to apologize and henceforth keep his opinions out of public view – for his own good, of course!   Via PJMedia:

Caligan contacted Sean Mack, his boss at Short Fuse Media Group, who seemed to take the whole thing in stride at first, writing in a communication, “If it’s not this, it would be for something else. Don’t stress over it. I’m good and we’re dealing with it head on. I have your back!” He quickly changed his tune with no explanation — presumably after being threatened by rabid SJWs and facing too much pressure by the lynch mob — and cut ties with Caligan. “I’m going to have to put some distance between us until you can change the perception people have of you,” wrote Mack. “I think you can fix this. It’s really up to you. Apologize and keep your comments and beliefs to your inner circle instead of public forums.”

More, via BoundingIntoComics:

You read that right. Will Caligan lost his job with Short Fuse Media Group because comments were deemed offensive. But Will tells us that losing his job wasn’t the worst part.

“Sean told me he was going to cut ties but in his press release he pretty much threw me under the bus. The issue was not getting fired. I think he has a right to work with whom ever he wants but what he doesn’t have the right to do is slander my name and throw me under the bus to do it. If his press release would have just said “We are cutting ties with Alpha Dog Studios” then I probably would have just let it go but that isn’t what he did. You can read the press release. He attacks me in it.”

And that’s exactly what the press release does. It attacks Will. But what’s even more ironic is that in the same press release where they are severing ties with Will for expressing his beliefs, the Short Fuse Media Group claims to “support and respect all PEOPLE from ALL walks of life.” Apparently, they don’t really believe that.

So there you have it: if you think that biology determines gender for human beings, you had better keep it to yourself if you do not want to be publicly denounced and hounded out of your job because you are apparently just like Hitler or something, and if you are a heterosexual male and a male who identifies as female wishes to be physically affectionate with you, you had better comply or you are also just like Hitler or something. This is the lunatic age we live in, until people stop fearing the leftist thought police mob, anyway.

If you are sympathetic to Will Caligan, you can offer him some words of encouragement HERE, but be aware that doing so will likely out you as being just like Hitler or something (it’s to his post on Facebook about the situation).

*******

MJ Stevenson, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla at MareZilla.com. She lives in a woodland shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her family and a large pack of guardian companion animals. 

Twenty-two years ago, popular music was drenched in and defined by alternative rock. Although grunge was reeling from Kurt Cobain’s suicide the previous year, artists spanning the alt world – Live, Alanis Morrisette, The Smashing Pumpkins, Alice In Chains – all had number one albums. Even as mainstream artists such as Hootie and the Blowfish burned brightly and then quickly faded away, it was alt rock that commanded the lion’s share of media attention and acclaim.

One would think given its lifelong penchant for aping the regular music world, in 1995 the Christian music industry would have been pumping out anything in flannel with a fuzztone as it attempted to cash in … er, reach the world by promoting artists attuned to the latest style in tunes. There were a few efforts, but to a one they made scarcely a dent in the regular music world’s conscious, let alone among the music-buying public (yes, kids, there was a time when people had to buy the music they wanted to hear instead of turning on Spotify and variations thereof to get it all for free or near-free). This left the handful of artists who played Christian alternative rock tucked into a cul-de-sac well off popular music’s main road. They were cherished by the faithful few who managed to find out said artists existed despite the profound absence of promotion and airplay within Christian music. Sadly, they were completely passed over by the mainstream audience that couldn’t get enough of artists and bands mining the same tuneful veins who ofttimes were the artistic inferiors of Christian artists, yet received all glory and praise while others languished in near total obscurity for the primary reason of those responsible for promoting these deserving artists being either unable to, or unwilling to, get the word out. One such band we today acknowledge, namely The Prayer Chain. Having recently put its 1995 and final studio album Mercury on its Bandcamp page provides the perfectly opportunity for unveiling this unknown slice of brilliance.

Rooted in Southern California, The Prayer Chain was on a record label owned by the management team that had made Amy Grant into a pop star. Yet even with this, it had not the slightest idea how to get the word out about this ferociously creative band. Apparently they were too busy blackballing me from the Christian music journalism world to undertake such an effort. But, that is a tale told elsewhere; back to Mercury.

The Prayer Chain was at its inception a fairly straightforward Christian rock band, albeit one with its sound firmly rooted in alternative rock’s aggressive guitar persona. The first hint this was not going to be a band prone to invitation at your local youth praise and worship session was 1993’s Shawl, when, on its first song, over a background chorus resembling an American Indian ghost dance chant fueled by peyote vocalist Tim Taber intoned ‘Shine is dead.’ For the record, “Shine” was the title of the band’s most upbeat Christianese song from its 1992 debut EP. From there, Shawl repeatedly bared its fangs, mixing songs such as one about a father abandoning his young son amid rich, florid without being pretentious Christian imagery. As superb as Shawl was, it only hinted at what was to come.

Mercury was originally presented to the record label in 1994 under the title Humb, an effort that so freaked out the powers that be they demanded some songs be removed altogether, other shuffled in play order, many remixed and reworked, and would you boys kindly record something new for the album we can actually release in the Christian marketplace. By this time in its brief lifespan the band was already falling apart, but it managed to put together the requested new track (“Sky High”). Yet even with this, The Prayer Chain maintained a fair amount of the anarchistic spirit that permeated the work; “Sky High” clocked in at a totally radio friendly exactly nine minutes.

Even in its slightly muted form as compared to the original, Mercury isn’t so much an album as a collection of cohesive chaos. A thick layer of effect-laden guitar sometimes drones and sometimes screams – quite regularly both simultaneously – as it swirls in and around slithery, frequently distorted bass lines, with drums more akin to an acidic percussionist than standard timekeeping completing the foundation for vocals from midnight in the garden where good and evil do battle. Had any of its standout tracks – “Waterdogs,” “Creole,” “Grylliade,” the list goes on – would have turned the mainstream alt rock world on its ear had they ever been brought to the attention of said ear. Which they weren’t. And so Mercury, and The Prayer Chain, regrettably slid out of view.

If you have any taste for raw, real music, don’t let past mistakes prevent you from seizing on this dark masterpiece. Get thee to the band’s Bandcamp site and buy Mercury today. It will shake you up for all the right reasons.