Most Members of sports media are liberal and it’s interesting to see the parallels between their conventional wisdom on the NBA playoffs regarding the Boston Celtics and the Conventional wisdom concerning Trump.

When Gordon Hayward went down in game one of the season Conventional Wisdom on sports radio said that the Celtics chances to make the NBA finals were practically gone, that was until Kyrie Irving led the team to an incredible run.

When Kyrie Irving went down with injury conventional wisdom on sports radio said that while the Celtics would make the playoffs because of their start they were doomed.

When the Celtics faced the Bucks conventional wisdom on sports said that Milwaukee would win because they had stars and the Celtics did not but it’s OK because it’s because their guys are hurt anyways.

When the Celtics beat the Bucks and found themselves faced with Philly conventional wisdom on sports radio said that Philly would beat them but the Celtics should be proud to have gotten this far and any wins here are gravey

When the Celtics demolished Philly conventional wisdom on the radio said that the Celtics didn’t have a chance against the Cleveland team and LeBron James who swept Toronto but they should celebrate getting that far

When the Celtics won game one vs the Cavs conventional wisdom on the radio said that LeBron would have a monster game two to make up for it and the Celtics, while game still were unlikely to beat Cleveland.

When the Celtics won game 2 (despite LeBron’s monster game) suddenly the conventional wisdom on the radio was that Cleveland was finished that LeBron didn’t have the horses and it was only a matter of time.

Yesterday Cleveland beat the Celtics convincingly on their own home court 116-86 leading the Celtics the entire game. I’ve not listened to the radio yet but I predict that when I do the conventional wisdom will suddenly once again turn on a dime.

The lesson of all of this? “Conventional Wisdom” is only reality if the people said wisdom is speaking about allow it to be so.

Because neither Cleveland nor the Celtics have allowed themselves to be led by conventional wisdom of sports reporters they will be masters of their own destiny in these game.

This is a lesson that President Trump has learned in regard to the political press and pundits. Would that the rest of the GOP would figure the same thing out.

It’s difficult to find anyone in Chengdu, a laidback city in central China known for its pandas and spicy food, who doesn’t know where they were at 2:28 p.m. on May 12, 2008.

That’s when a massive earthquake, one of the worst ever in China, left 87,000 people dead, 370,000 injured, and five million people homeless in the Sichuan Province around Chengdu.

DaTech3.jpg

The earthquake happened during the school day. Substandard construction of the buildings resulted in thousands of children dying in what become known as “tofu schools” because they were so unstable and toppled during the earthquake.

The mountains around Sichuan rise more than three miles above the neighboring plains and about 40 miles from Chengdu. They form a wrinkle in the earth’s crust caused by the Indian and Eurasian plates pushing against each other. They’re the same forces that formed the Himalayas.

The towns most affected by 2008’s magnitude-8 earthquake—such as Beichuan, Wenchuan, and Mianzhu—were built near the Longmenshan Fault, a tear in the earth’s crust and a hotspot for quakes. The 2008 event shook buildings nearby for nearly two minutes and was felt 800 miles away in Beijing.

The disaster happened just as China was ready to host the Summer Olympics, a sort of coming-out party for the country.

Over the past decade, China worked to rebuild the homes and lives of those affected. Shiny new roads and sturdy buildings replaced the rubble. Displaced families found new homes. Bereaved parents gave birth to thousands of so-called “replacement children.” Earthquake warning systems were put in place throughout the country.

A nationwide initiative was launched to ensure safe primary and middle schools, injecting about $60 billion toward the goal of making schools safe.

Nevertheless, critics say the Chinese government, which they believe should be held accountable for the inferior buildings, have rejected fair compensation for those affected by the tragedy.

The misuse of money also created a huge credibility problem for the government. At one point, a Chinese celebrity’s photos flaunting her lavish lifestyle on social media became the catalyst for exposing the Red Cross Society’s mismanagement of the Sichuan relief funds.

The woman claimed to be working for a Red Cross subsidiary even as she regularly shared pictures of herself posing with luxury cars at upscale resorts and restaurants. After angry online readers dug into her personal life, it emerged that her boyfriend was a shareholder of an investment-holding group affiliated with the Red Cross.

Ultimately, a variety of people were convicted of embezzling funds. As a result of this scandal and others, Chinese remain reluctant to donate funds to charities.

Ten years later, the memories of what happened still loom large. A government desire to declare “thanksgiving” for what happened after the earthquake created a stir on the internet. Many wanted the victims to be remembered rather than what the government did after the earthquake. See DaTimes at https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/10/world/asia/china-sichuan-earthquake-thanksgiving.html

For better and worse, the earthquake changed the region and the country and continues to do so even today.

It just hit me that in all our critique of the Michelle Wolf business before an audience of reporters that something was missing.

A Tom Brokaw joke.

Here is a woman, supposedly speaking truth to power, who prides herself as a supporter of #metoo who had no problem hitting powerful influential republican women but didn’t have a joke to make about Tom Brokaw

or Matt Lauer

or Charlie Rose

or Garrison Kellor

after all there were a lot of media targets to choose from.

I wonder why?  (Full disclose, no I don’t.)

Closing thought, just remember NONE of this comes out if Hillary Clinton wins.

2018 has not been kind to our numbers or our traffic, tip jar and particularly subscription side.

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Sun-Times headquarters

By John Ruberry

A week ago the Chicago Sun-Times began a high-profile begging campaign with a white splash–a blank sheet of paper–as its front page to draw attention to an op-ed, “Imagine Chicago without the Sun-Times: An urgent appeal.”

Or, the editorial could be titled, give us money or the Sun-Times will shut down.

“Until now, we’ve offered our online content for free. But we can no longer afford to operate our business this way,” the Sun-Times said in that plea. “Imagine our city without our headlines,” it continues. “Without our journalists to tell your side of the story.”

Your side?

My side?

Since then I’ve noticed three follow-ups, including two columns–my guess is they were ordered by Sun-Times brass to write them–by Richard Roeper and Neil Steinberg. This morning on Fox Chicago’s Flannery Fired Up, the Sun-Times’ managing editor, Chris Fusco, along with James Warren, who held the same job at the competing Chicago Tribune, pleaded the case for online Sun-Times subscriptions, which the host, Mike Flannery, endorsed as he told the pair that he had just signed up.

Warren said of the current owners of the newspaper, “They’re severely undercapitalized.”

Who owns the Chicago Sun-Times? A consortium of left-leaning investors, including a former Chicago alderman and failed Democratic candidate for governor, along with the Chicago Federation of Labor, which is an umbrella group of local unions. The CFL’s executive board is heavy with public-sector union bosses.

Chicago is one of the few cities left that has two mass-market daily newspapers. Television struck the first blow against big-city newspapers decades ago; the internet, which newspapers embraced twenty years ago when most of them put their content online for free–naively hoping that ad revenue would pay the bills–provided the second blow.

Houston, we have a problem. The city that seems poised to surpass Chicago in population, became a one mass-market newspaper town in 1995 when the Houston Post folded.

Or does Houston really have a problem?

Wikpedia lists nearly two-dozen Houston area newspapers, to be fair, none of them I’ve heard of until today. Sure, some of them are online-only publications. But is a book a book if it only appears on Kindle?

I believe so.

Of course there are scores of blogs based in Houston, perhaps many more, similar to the one you are reading now, as well as my own Chicago-area blog, Marathon Pundit–both of which represent my side. Perhaps yours too. The media elites love to dismiss blogs and news sites such as the Daily Caller, the Washington Examiner, or Breitbart as fake news, but of course the big shots never get things wrong.

Oh, the Chicago area boasts a dozen daily newspapers.

Let’s take a closer look at the Sun-Times’ side.

Richard Roeper was suspended then demoted by the Sun-Times after he was exposed for buying 25,000 Twitter followers.

Neil Steinberg, who blocked me on Twitter shortly after Election Day two years ago because I objected to a whacked-out anti-Donald Trump column spewed by him, is in my opinion the most execrable columnist in America. He should, as the late great Sun-Times-based Ann Landers would regularly advise, “seek counseling.”

The Holocaust was in part a failure of imagination. Jews just couldn’t imagine it. Which has to trouble anyone insisting it can’t happen now. Because that’s exactly what they thought then.

If you can’t see how this could turn really bad, really quick, let me ask you this: When Donald Trump fails to provide the boon he promised, when his protectionist trade policies crater the economy, who is he going to blame? Himself? Donald Trump does not blame himself.

Who will he blame? When he’s in Pennsylvania, talking to coal miners whose industry he did not revive; when he’s in Youngstown talking to factory workers whose jobs never returned, who will he blame? Who?

You know the answer.

Since November, 2016 the Trump economy has boomed, his daughter and son-in-law, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, both Orthodox Jews, have enjoyed enormous power, some say too much, in the White House. And Trump will move our embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, to the delight of many Jewish-Americans and of course, the Israeli government.

There is no Trump pogrom.

Steinberg later wrote a penitent book about the experience, but in 2005 he was arrested and jailed for a night after hitting his wife while he was drunk. He initially tried to use a public defender as his lawyer. Steinberg was being paid by the Sun-Times, right? At the time Steinberg was a member of the Sun-Times editorial board.

Not my side

Let’s take a look at the Sun-Times’ other regular opinion columnists. Mark Brown, Lynn Sweet, and Mary Mitchell are also leftists. The paper does re-print an occasional S.E. Cupp, piece, but this co-called conservative is a #NeverTrump Republican.

I didn’t forget about the Chicago Federation of Labor. As Illinois continues to plummet into the financial abyss, many members of the unions that comprise the CFL are doing well because they are or will be receiving generous but unaffordable taxpayer-funded pensions. While a couple of Republican governors share blame in the debacle, Michael Madigan, the man a former Sun-Times reporter, Dave McKinney, says is “the man behind the fiscal fiasco in Illinois,” deserves most of the dishonor. Illinois’ “House speaker-for-life” and “state Democratic Party chairman-for-life” has raked in a lot of CFL cash over the years, as has his daughter, the lame duck state attorney general, Lisa Madigan, as this Illinois Policy Institute graphic explains.

Definitely not my side.

Mike Madigan is the problem in Illinois, but don’t expect the Sun-Times to call for his ouster.

As Illinois and Chicago continues to lose population because of tax increases to attempt to pay for the local edition of what I called in this space The Great American Pension Swindle, this people-drain becomes the Sun-Times’ problem too. Fewer people living here means fewer readers and subscribers. If you live in Omaha, what does the Sun-Times offer you? Chicago’s best days are in the past and I expect that Chicago won’t remain a two mass-market-newspaper town for long. The Sun-Times is battling history with fewer troops in its camp.

Blogger at Chicago’s Trump Tower

But there will be other voices that will persevere.

Including mine.

And no, I won’t become a monthly subscriber to the Sun-Times.

Now, if the Sun-Times wants to add opinions like mine, then perhaps I’ll reconsider.

John Ruberry, a fifth-generation Illinoisan, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

by baldilocks

Today I was interviewed by Chris Levels, who host a BlogTalkRadio show four days a week called Politics and Prophecy.   It was the second time that Chris invited me to his show, the second time that one of us had equipment failure, and the second time that I was one longer that scheduled. It’s as if the invisible supernatural war springs to the surface a little every time I’m on. I like that.

Whenever I do these things I feel as though I’m babbling, however. I used to try to prepare for them, but it makes things worse because I end up reading, and, therefore, sounding stilted. I’ve done a couple of them for Fausta back when she had a show but I refuse to listen to them. I’ve calmed done a lot since then.

Chris brought up several interesting topics and one made me crack up laughing, though it is far from funny. My laughter was in response to this story about the Southern Poverty Law Center. Because irony is funny.

If its balance sheet is any indication, Donald Trump’s presidency has been very good for the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC’s already impressive endowment grew a staggering 35 percent in fiscal year 2017 to more than $432 million. Including operating funds, total assets topped $477 million as of October 31, 2017. Total revenues and gains in fiscal 2017 exceeded $180 million, more than triple the organization’s expenses for the year, of just under $60 million.

The SPLC has long been considered a fundraising powerhouse, but 2017’s take was mind boggling by any standard. Donations were up 164 percent over 2016: The group took in $132 million between November 2016 and October 2017, compared with $50 million in the preceding 12 months.

While direct contributions produced the lion’s share of the 2017 increase, a booming stock market led to astounding growth in the SPLC’s investment portfolio. In fiscal 2016, unrealized gains came to less than $1 million; a year later they totaled nearly $45 million.

The SPLC, whose website touts its mission as “seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society,” drew fire last year because it keeps nearly $70 million in foreign investments in the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, and Bermuda, as reported by THE WEEKLY STANDARD. Non-U.S. investments this year are closing in on $100 million, totaling a little more than $92.5 million as of October 31, 2017.

And peep these salaries!

Despite the 2017 windfall, salaries of top SPLC officials and executives were roughly the same or in some cases even lower than the year before. Richard Cohen, the group’s president and CEO, and Morris Dees, co-founder and chief trial counsel, each earned around $400,000 both years. Compensation for other top officials ranged from about $150,000 to $260,000.

Down, covetous streak! Down!

I wondered aloud to Chris about having a tenth of that. But, aside from the off-shore investments, who can blame the SPLC if like-minded entities want to keep it afloat? (Afloat might be understating the matter, yes.)

And I bet they don’t even see the hypocrisy in keeping the word poverty in the organization’s name. After all, it takes money to remain Down for the Struggle!TM

However, if ideologues put their money where their ideology is, what does that say about the Right?

What does that say about you, loyal readers?

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Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

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By John Ruberry

Synesthesia: “A sensation produced in one modality when a stimulus is applied to another modality, as when the hearing of a certain sound induces the visualization of a certain color,” so says Dictionary.com.

If there is a void in your musical life and you are a fan of the Kinks and the Beatles, or perhaps Oasis, then I suggest you explore the career of XTC, the most unappreciated band of its time.

And what a time it was. XTC was part of the Class of 1977, rock and roll’s last great year in my opinon, when the Clash, Blondie, Talking Heads, Elvis Costello and many more burst onto the musical scene. By 1999, after a seven year strike against its British label, when they released their penultimate album, Apple Venus Volume 1, only Costello and XTC remained as active acts.

Like the Beatles, XTC evolved musically into a much different group when it was all over.

Late last year in Great Britain and early this year in the United States, the documentary, yes, rockumentarty, XTC: This Is Pop was released. It’s available where I live on Showtime and Xfinity OnDemand.

What became XTC began in the southwestern English city of Swindon, the onetime home of the Swindon Works of the Great Western Railway, with a band started by its de facto leader, Andy Partridge. Bassist Colin Moulding and drummer Terry Chambers rounded out the nucleus of the group. London keyboardist Barry Andrews, the only XTCer who is not interviewed for This Is Pop, later joined; he appears on the band’s first two albums, White Music and GO2, which comprise the band’s punk period. After Andrews’ departure he was replaced by another Swindonian, guitarist Dave Gregory.

“I actually think we started pretty damn good and then got a lot better. And there’s not too many bands can say that’s their arc,” Partridge immodestly but correctly boasts about XTC.

Yet there is some humor in This Is Pop that offsets the braggadocio.

“Don’t you dare have-into this documentary,” Partridge waves off “that lugubrious keyboard player from that prog-rock group,” Rick Wakeman of Yes, who makes a hilarious cameo.

Partridge says of his troubled childhood, “I never thought I was good at anything until I got more and more into drawing and painting.”

Imagine if legendary filmmaker Akira Kurosawa, who early in his life aspired to be a painter, formed a rock group instead. It just might have sounded like XTC.

The band’s breakthrough in 1979 came not from a Partridge-penned tune but one by Moulding, “We’re Only Making Plans For Nigel” from their third album, Drums and Wires, which Little Marathon Pundit said of the other day, “That’s one song I like.” If its sonorous drum patterns seem familiar, that’s because engineer Hugh Padham discovered that effect while recoding “Nigel” before bringing the technique to Phil Collins’ “In The Air Tonight.” Many other 1980s acts swiped that sound.

The next two albums, Black Sea and English Settlement, brought more–albeit modest–success and momentum to XTC as it rounded out its New Wave period. But as the Kinks often bungled their career, XTC’ sabotaged things too, although not intentionally as I’ve always suspected the Kinks did. The effects of Partridge’s Valium addiction, which went back to when he was 12, and the withdrawal effects, led to a nervous breakdown during a Paris concert–which is shown in This Is Pop. The lads from Swindon still traveled to the United States for their first tour as a headliner. But what should have been an American victory lap lasted just one show. Outside of a smattering of radio and television appearances, they never performed live again.

XTC’s pastoral era brought three albums, Mummer, The Big Express, and Skylarking. But within that period XTC’s psychedelic alter ego, the Dukes of Stratosphear, released two collections that outsold those last two in the UK.

Before recording Skylarking, Partridge tells us, their record label issued an ultimatum: You need to grow your American audience and hire an American producer. Presented with a list of unfamiliar names, Partridge chose the only one he had heard of: Todd Rundgren. The result was the band’s masterpiece, Skylarking. On it you find the conceptual orchestral greatness of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. But because Partridge and “Runt” butted heads–they probably had too much in common–the studio atmosphere mirrored the angst of the Beatles’ White Album recording sessions. XTC came close to blowing this moment too as the original pressings of Skylarking omitted the best song from the Rundgren sessions, the controversial atheist anthem “Dear God.” It was the B-side of the “Grass” single. American deejays elevated “Dear God” to prominence. Their record company was right, XTC needed a jump start from America.

Earlier I mentioned synesthesia. “How I write a lot of the songs, I will find a chord or a chord change on a guitar or on a keyboard,” Partridge describes his songwriting technique, “and I’m playing those but not I’m not hearing music–I’m seeing pictures. That’s how I write songs, it comes usually from the synesthesic level.”

And I wager you thought I was overreaching with the Akira Kurosawa comparison.

“Synesthesia is where you get stuff mixed up,” Partridge expands on his thoughts, “someone will say a number and you’ll hear a noise, or someone will show you a color and you’ll think of a number, or you’ll hear a peace of music or a chord and to me it makes a picture.”

And that is why XTC’s music is different.

The follow-up to Skylarking was 1989’s Oranges and Lemons, another success as XTC entered its proto-Britpop era.

Chambers left during the pastoral period and Gregory departed shortly after XTC’s recording strike ended. Their band’s final album, Wasp Star (Apple Venus Volume 2), was released in 2000.

An eclectic group of commentators contribute context to This Is Pop, including Stewart Copeland of the Police, Blondie’s Clem Burke, and a veteran mockumentary performer, Harry Shearer, who, unlike Wakeman, plays it straight here.

Woven into This Is Pop is the countryside of southwestern England and a model train set winding through an intricately-reconstructed Swindon, because it doesn’t seem possible to separate XTC from their hometown.

XTC: This Is Pop is an essential film about an essential band, a group that belongs in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The documentary can be streamed on Amazon.

John Ruberry, who has been an XTC fan since 1979 after hearing “We’re Only Making Plans for Nigel” on WXRT-FM in Chicago, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

My advice post for the GOP is on hold for a day or two because of events in Syria.  Here are 10 thoughts under my fedora on the subject.

I’m really thinking that Putin are falling for MSM propaganda on the president’s weakness.  I think the Russians and/or Syrians and/or Iranians wrongly perceived that Trump’s public desire to be out of Syria meant open season to use gas, big mistake (and please don’t insult my intelligence by suggesting that the Syrians might use this gas without the consent of the Russians.


Watching the coverage on CNN was interesting.  Because there was no warning that this was coming there was no coordination with Democrats on how to react and since they can’t hit Trump for punishing Syria for gassing innocent people  they had to play it straight to a large degree.  They really didn’t like that.


Another interesting problem for the MSM was the contrast between Trump doing what he said he would do on Syria and the Obama administrations making threats and red lines that meant nothing.  The only bright side for them was contrasting Trump’s previous statements before he was in the White House.


I was wondering how long it would take MSNBC to call this a “wag the dog” scenario.  Unfortunately for them there has been a week of talk about Syria and gas which makes that entire argument weak, there is also the help from England and France which is not something you can coordinate in a day or two which really hurts the credibility of the argument, but that won’t stop most “never trumpers” from playing that card.


it’s also worth noting Trump got a lot of credit for getting a coalition together for this attack, even Joe Scarborough who certainly can’t be accused of carrying Trump’s water complemented him on this.  I was surprised he was able to get the French, the British were less of a surprise.  It’s amazing how nations are more willing to hit your allies when you go around poisoning people on their soil.


A few days ago at work a friend from Haiti was very worried about Putin’s threat to shoot down anything attacking in Syria.  I told him not to worry because it was a bluff.  Today has confirmed that to be true although that’s not how it will be played in Russia.  Every time they play that game Russian and Iranian prestige in the area drops like a rock.


This has got to be a huge worry for Iran, North Korea and China.  After all if Trump is willing to go toe to toe with Putin he’s certainly not going to show any restraint on Iran and you had better believe little Kim has noticed this.


Don’t think for one minute the contrasting messages between Trump and his generals to the press is an accident.  This president is a big believer in keeping the other side guessing.  The conflicting messages are to cause the maximum confusion to the enemy as they decide what to do next.


I’m figuring that by Sunday the MSM and Democrats will have decided on a unified theme to go with here.  All of it will depending on the polling they see.  If the polling is mixed they’ll go all in with the “wag the dog” business suggesting that all of this was to distract from Comey and Cohen citing a lack of public evidence of Syrian actions while at the same time not demanding any such evidence the administration has be made public so as not to allow Trump to justify his actions.  Secondly they will contrast his previous remarks to his current actions to back up the whole “wag the dog” meme.  If the polling proves this to be popular they might just decide to get behind it to head off the GOP taking credit.


In terms of politics this is the worst possible thing to happen to the left.  Trump leading an international force to confront a country using chemical weapons is very presidential and it comes as his polling is some of the best we’ve seen for him in a while.  A foreign policy success combined with a strong economy might just give the GOP enough courage to fight back against the left’s TET offensive, particularly if it’s combined with an effective slogan, but that’s the post I’ve put off till tomorrow.

Photo courtesy of history.com

As The Washington Post’s Saigon bureau chief Peter Braestrup documented in his book The Big Story, reporters systematically used Tet to turn the reality of a U.S. victory into an image of American and South Vietnamese defeat…That campaign of misrepresentation culminated in Walter Cronkite’s half-hour TV special on February 27, 1968, when he told his viewers that Tet had proved that America was “mired in a stalemate.”

Christopher Harper Fake News and Vietnam 2/13/18

In my last post I noted that there are significant differences between the events leading up to the “Big Red Wave” of 2010 and the supposed big blue wave of 2018 the most significant being that despite broken promises on Obamacare repeal, partially corrected by the passage of the Trump Tax bill, there is actually a record of significant achieve on foreign policy, on deregulation and of course on the economic outlook of the country.

Given those facts on the ground one would think that the outlook for the GOP would be pretty good but the MSM has been relentless in their attacks on the administration and the downplaying of their accomplishments focusing instead on Porn stars and the Mueller investigation and while the polling suggests that the public isn’t interested in stuff like Stormy Daniels and twelve year old consensual affairs the dirty little secret is the public aren’t the target of the MSM offensive.

The audience the MSM is trying to reach are the republican members of congress and the GOP consultants in the Washington bubble.

You see it doesn’t matter how the economy is doing, how much more the GOP is raising or how much better the public is doing, as long as the MSM aided by social media giants like Facebook and Twitter, can convince the GOP members of congress that defeat in the fall is inevitable and that Trump is the cause, they can cause them (the GOP) to retreat.

It’s Tet all over again, Cronkite and the MSM had an agenda and were the only game in town and thus were able to sell said agenda to the people. as Christopher Harper put it:

“After Tet, American media had assumed a new mission for itself: to shape the nation’s politics by crafting a single coherent narrative, even if it meant omitting certain relevant facts and promoting other false or misleading ones. standing — just as they had convinced them a year earlier that America’s major victory was actually a major defeat.”

Sound familiar?

It certainly does and their new mission is to reverse the results of the last election and step one is to convince the GOP that election 2018 is already lost and convince them to leave the field and given the GOP’s apparent fear of governing and fighting for the principles they supposedly espouse it’s not a surprise that so far the media and left are doing a pretty good job of selling them this reality.

The GOP needs a shot of courage and a meme to run on. Tomorrow we’ll provide the latter in the hopes of restoring the former.

Update: Instalanche again thanks again Ed. Dear reader I submit and suggest if you want to really annoy the MSM please consider supporting sites like mine as you are the primary source of the money that pays our expenses, our writers (yes I pay them) and myself.


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I spoke to Vito and Vito of the Vito and Vito show at CPAC 2018

For those of you who missed the post in question, because Scottie Neil Hughes didn’t make it to CPAC Vito ended up with the Cannoli Dutch Kitchen made special for her, the post about it is here and the video is here

You can find the Vito and Vito show here


DaTechGuy at CPAC 2018 The story (blogged) so far:
Thursday April 5th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Vito and Vito of the Vito and Vito Show
Voices of CPAC 2018 Lee Stranahan

Wednesday April 4th
Voices of CPAC 2018 William Hoge of Hogewash
Voices at CPAC 2018 Byron York of the Washington Examiner

Tuesday April 3rd

Voices of CPAC 2018 Erik Svane of ¡No Pasarán!
Voices of CPAC 2018 Gregory Wrighforce Inconvenient Facts

Monday April 2nd
Voices of CPAC 2018 Becky Noble of Politichicks
Voices of CPAC 2018 Andrew Mangioni of the Association of Mature American Citizens

Sunday April 1st
Voices of CPAC 2018 Dave Weigel of the Washington Post
Voices of CPAC 2018 Walking Interview James O’Keefe

Saturday March 31st

Voices of CPAC 2018: Michael from Scotland.
Voices of CPAC 2018 Gina Roberts Log Cabin Republicans San Diego

Friday March 30th

Voices of CPAC 2018 The Great Evan Sayet
Voices of CPAC 2018 MaryAnn after President Trump’s Speech

Thursday March 29th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Kathleen Wepner of Patriot Guardians
Voices of CPAC 2018 William Nardy of Rousa News PLUS the Lone Conservative Kassy Dylan

Wednesday March 28th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Peter from Reno
Voices of CPAC 2018 Tyler from Florida Post Trump Speech

Tuesday March 27th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Ricard from NY post Trump speech
3 Clips of President Trump at CPAC 2018 plus Rachel from VA again

Monday March 26

Voices of CPAC 2018 Jeff Hulbert of Patriot Picket
Voices of CPAC 2018 Adam from NY of the Young Republicans

Sunday March 25

Voices of CPAC 2018 Betina Viviano of the Media group America’s Voice
Voices of CPAC 2018 Susanne Monk of Trump Talk

Saturday March 24th

Voices from CPAC 2018: Tyler

Friday March 23rd

Voices of CPAC 2018 Debra (Nice Deb) Heine

Thursday March 22nd

Voices of CPAC 2018 Traci Belmonte

Wednesday March 21st

Voices of CPAC 2018 Evan of the College Republicans

Tuesday March 20th

Voices from CPAC 2018 Chris from EWTN

Monday March 19th

Voices at CPAC Heather of Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty

Saturday March 17th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Seton Motley of Less Government

Friday March 16th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Leo from MA

Thursday March 15th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Yvonne from Illinois

Wednesday March 14

Voices of CPAC 2018 Kurt Schlichter

Tuesday March 13th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Tony (Don’t call him Anthony) Katz

Monday March 12th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Elizabeth of the Mt. Holyoke College Republicans (Yes you read that right)

Sunday March 11th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Grizzly Joe

Voices of CPAC 2018 Rachel from Virginia

Saturday March 10th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Connor Wolf of Inside Sources

Friday March 9th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Chase from the Houston Young Republicans

Thursday March 8th

Voices at CPAC 2018 Chris from NY Longtime Prolife activist

Saturday March 10th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Connor Wolf of Inside Sources

Friday March 9th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Chase from the Houston Young Republicans

Thursday March 8th

Voices at CPAC 2018 Chris from NY Longtime Prolife activist

Wednesday March 7th

Voices at CPAC 2018 Michael from Liberty University

Tuesday March 6th

Voices at CPAC 2018 Sarah Rumpf

Monday March 5th

Voices from CPAC 2018 Doreen from Michigan
Voices of CPAC 2018 Susan from New Mexico

Sunday March 4th
Voices of CPAC 2018 Myra Adams

Friday March 2nd

Voices of CPAC 2018 John Hawkins and Sierra Marlee

CPAC 2018: Two Men who made a Difference For Me

Wednesday Feb 20

Voices at CPAC 2018 Dylan and Watson

Voices at CPAC 2018 Kira Innis (Two Angles)

Monday Feb 26th

Voices of CPAC 2018 Greg Penglis of WEBY 1330 Radio

Sunday Feb 25th

CPAC 2018 Dutch Kitchen Cannoli Sicilian from Brooklyn Approved

Saturday Feb 24th

CPAC 2018 / Don’t give a VUK Meet the Voter the Media Narrative says Does Exist

Friday Feb 23rd

Voices at CPAC 2018 Senator Ted Cruz Answers Two Question for DaTechGuy

Thurs Feb 22nd

We Interrupt CPAC 2018 for CNN and their Gun Control Galaxy Quest Moment
Voices of CPAC 2018: Ron from PA

Wed Feb. 21st

Voices at CPAC 2018 Vicki from Minnesota

Voices at (or near) #cpac2018 Lea from National Association of Developmental Educators We talk Students and Math

DaTechGuy at CPAC 2018 The Calm Before the Storm and What I’ll be Asking

If you don’t want to wait or my blog posts to see my interviews my youtube channel is here.

Full CPAC 2017 list (for those who feel nostalgic) is here

A reminder I have copies of my Book Hail Mary the perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer available at CPAC with me, price $7 and I will happily sign them for you.

Or you can just order it on Amazon

If you don’t want to wait or my blog posts to see my interviews my youtube channel is here.

Full CPAC 2017 list (for those who feel nostalgic) is here

A reminder I have copies of my Book Hail Mary the perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer available at CPAC with me, price $7 and I will happily sign them for you.

Or you can just order it on Amazon


Sipping whisky from a paper cup
You drown your sorrows ‘til you can’t stand up
Take a look at what you’ve done to yourself
Why don’t you put the bottle back on the shelf
Shooting junk ‘til you’re half insane
A broken needle in a purple vein
Why don’t you look into Jesus
He’s got the answer

 

from “Why Don’t You Look Into Jesus” by Larry Norman

 

On “Center Of My Heart,” a song from Tourniquet which was Larry Norman’s final studio album before he passed away ten years ago, he included the line “I’m a walking contradiction.” After reading Gregory Alan Thornbury’s Why Should the Devil Have All the Good Music?: Larry Norman and the Perils of Christian Rock, it’s obvious truer words have seldom been spoken.

Thornbury’s biography of Larry Norman, Christian rock’s founding father in the 1960s and most polarizing figure to this day, is a fascinating and sobering look at the life of a man almost perpetually surrounded by controversy. Much of it was Norman’s own doing, intentional or no; his incessant need to be in control and insistence on being a lone wolf utterly convinced of his selected path’s correctness often frayed and sometimes shattered relationships both professional and personal. Yet, he could also be generous to a fault with his time, money, and talents. He was also a brilliant songwriter and performer, penning and recording work that remains stunningly powerful and genuinely life-changing for those who have ears to hear.

Norman, to quote from a song by Mark Heard whose early career was directly influenced by Norman, was too sacred for the sinners and the saints wished he’d leave. The former were often off-put by Norman’s frequent references to Christ crucified and risen, while the latter routinely freaked out over his mixing straightforward love and political songs, plus generous use of allegory and parable, into his body of work. Norman didn’t care. It was his vision, done his way, take it or leave it.

The book does an excellent job in painting the backdrop for Norman’s life and times, managing the not inconsiderable feat of detailing such elements as the Jesus People movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s in a manner both informative to the uninitiated and not dreary for those already in the know. Some biographers tell a tale of life well; others specialize in times. Thornbury does both well.

Thornbury mentions more than once how Norman in concert sought not to entertain, but rather to challenge his audience, having no hesitation about making it feel uncomfortable through in-between song musings as well as in the songs themselves. He posed questions about faith and how believers should conduct themselves in the world, detailing the need to demolish the Christian ghetto and actually be in the world but not of it. Norman was simultaneously icon and iconoclast, the one without whom most every contemporary Christian artists would not be there while at the same time asking what they were doing there, as they were neither witnessing to non-believers nor edifying those who were already Christians.

The book is unflinching in its examination of Norman and those around him; his first wife Pamela and his early protege Randy Stonehill both come off quite poorly. However, the book also tosses bouquets as easily as it does brickbats. It is no hatchet job designed to speak maximum ill of the dead or the living. In lieu thereof it is, as best as Norman can be capsulated, a multi-level study of a multi-level man who won friends, made enemies, influenced many far more than they are willing to admit, and left it for others to argue about as he decidedly did it his way. If you love Larry Norman, or have no idea who he was, Why Should the Devil Have All the Good Music?: Larry Norman and the Perils of Christian Rock is enriching reading that, even as Norman did with his work, forces reflection.

The book is available from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.