Guy Flegman: Did you guys ever watch the show?

 

Galaxy Quest 1999

Dana Loesch: (commenting on MSM)  Many in legacy media love mass shootings.  You guys love it.  I’m not saying you love the tragedy, I’m saying you love the rating Crying white mothers are rating gold for you and many of the legacy media in the back   notice I said crying white mothers, because there are thousands of grieving black mothers in Chicago and you don’t see a CNN town hall for them do you?    Where’s the CNN town hall for Chicago?  Where’s the CNN town hall for sanctuary cities?  Where was the CNN town hall for Jamil  Shaw Sr whose son was murdered by someone who illegally entered the country and had been deported repeatedly?   

CPAC 2018

One of the problems with being at CPAC is that on occasion things happen you need to comment on while your busy somewhere else.

Today I watched Dana Loesch speak to a crowd that loved her and excoriate the media that we bloggers are now sitting with while remembering the days when Dana was a blogger like me an she told the story of CNN and their Panel on guns yesterday and that story reminded me of one of my favorite comedy sci-fi movies, Galaxy Quest.

One of my favorite scenes that classic sci-fi parody movie is when the cast, finding itself enlisted by an alien race who thinks their TV show is real finds itself on an away mission on a planet to get a Beryllium sphere for power.

Said cast, which is joined by one fan of the show who had a bit part on a single episode, encounter a group of small cute looking alien creatures in the area which prompts the following exchange

Guy Fleegman: I don’t like this. I don’t like this at all.
Gwen DeMarco: They are *so* cute.
Guy Fleegman: Sure, they’re cute now, but in a second they’re gonna get mean, and they’re gonna get ugly somehow, and there’s gonna be a million more of them.

This perfectly illustrates the mindset of CNN going into last night “Town Hall”.

For several days since the shootings in Florida the media has played the evil NRA card, the Trump is responsible card and has used children traumatized by tragedy as political props to advance Democrat prospects in general and a gun control agenda in particular.

The jewel in the agenda’s crown was to be the CNN Town hall with a bunch of kids from the school and packed to the brim with folks ready to cheer the confiscation of guns and condemn the NRA. it was going to be the stake in the heart of the NRA’s power and the event that would stop the suddenly iffy pols for Democrats going into the midterms

And then the event actually took place.

Here are some pieces on the event  Hotair:

I’m sorry, I know I’m not supposed to do this, but I’m not going to listen to that. Senator Rubio, it’s hard to look at you and not look down the barrel on an AR-15 and not look at Nikolas Cruz, but the point is: You’re here and there are some people who are not.”

That comes right at the start of the clip, which is noteworthy. This wasn’t the kid working himself into a lather as he remembered the shooting and saying something vicious in the heat of the moment that he might regret later. This is the opening of his question to Rubio. It’s obviously a canned line he prepared and wanted to squeeze in while he had the chance. He’s grandstanding with the nastiest smear he could think of, knowing he won’t be criticized for it.

Don’t think for a second that law abiding gun owners whose votes the Democrats might need if they want the house back didn’t realize what was going on

However you feel about Rubio, though, digest this and don’t forget it: He wasn’t called a murderer because he holds outre, far out of the mainstream opinions about gun rights, he was called a murderer because he doesn’t. He believes in a constitutional right to own a weapon for self-defense. He doesn’t believe all semiautomatics should be banned. If that makes him a murderer it makes you a murderer too. That, in so many words, was the real point of this event, to wave the bloody shirt and indict all law-abiding gun-rights supporters as complicit in the attack in Parkland.

Remember that’s Allahpundit the most liberal of the Hotair crowd writing this.

Newsbusters:

After Rubio answered his question, Kasky began to browbeat him for the money the NRA donated to his campaign, basically insinuating he was being bribed. “And this is about people who are for making a difference to save us and people who are against it and prefer money. So Senator Rubio, can you tell me right now that you will not accept a single donation from the NRA in the future,” he demanded as the crowd went crazy.

Luckily the event was moderated, sort of

As the ridiculousness and the crowd noise grew to outrageous proportions, that was when Tapper finally stepped in. “Cameron is having a conversation with Senator Rubio. Let’s let them talk,” he requested. Basically, Tapper wouldn’t stop the radical leftist smears against Rubio but he would quiet the crowd to hear more of them.

And remember Tapper is the fairest they have

Meanwhile Dana Loesch who got praise from both sides for how she carried herself also got the CNN “townhall” treatment.

She added that she was “fighting for my kids” and “all of you because I don’t want anyone to ever be in this position again” and, to the rising boos, she correctly emphasized that it’s “not federally required for states to actually report people who are prohibited possessors, crazy people, people who are murderers” to the NICS database.

 

After enduring a slew of new jeers, Loesch told the NHL arena crowd to “let me answer the question” twice and “[y]ou can shout me down when I’m finished, but let me answer Emma’s question.” It was here that someone shouted, “you’re a murderer” at the top of their lungs. Once again, Tapper did nothing to call out this behavior.

Of course there might be a reason why CNN let this go on this way:

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Colton Haab said he was approached by CNN to ask a question at Wednesday night’s town hall but decided not to after the network gave him a “scripted question,” quashing one he wrote himself. Haab, a member of the Junior ROTC shielded students while the school was under attack from the shooter, said he was going to ask about using veterans as armed security guards. (CNN response below.)

“CNN had originally asked me to write a speech and questions and it ended up being all scripted,” Haab told WPLG-TV.

Unlike the kids at the event CNN show no hesitation in challenging his assertions.

The Daily caller nailed it:

It’s no secret that the people cheering on these pained and suffering students just happen to share the same political goals (and enemies) as the students. It’s a lot easier to cheer somebody on when they’re skewering your political opponents as child murderers.

And then we have traffic and ratings incentives for the media, which are to package these teenagers’ hurt and confusion into segments and clips to be aired over and over again, turning their real pain into reality TV for the rest of us.

When CNN executives give the order to put emotional and vulnerable teenagers front and center all day, do we really think their thought process is guided by what’s best for the teens? Is Jeff Zucker all of a sudden an altruist?

The more likely and more uncomfortable truth is that networks are putting their own interests first (as networks tend to do) and rationalizing it away as a public service. You can rationalize exploitation any way you want to, but it’s still exploitation.

Meanwhile in the real world a few people took note of what was said

That would seem newsworthy Tapper mentioned this online
More Gutfeld

and then there is this:

and the reactions to it:

I think this is going to be the wellstone memorial on steroids, I think it will have the same effect as the Antifa mobs did, it will tell lawful gun owners that as far as the left is concerned they are a bunch of killers and if they get power they will be treated accordingly.

If you wanted to energize the right for this key election I don’t think CNN could have done a better job.


DaTechGuy at CPAC 2018 The story so far:

Thurs Feb 22nd

We Interrupt CPAC 2018 for CNN and their Gun Control Galaxy Quest Moment

Voices of CPAC 2018: Ron from PA

Wed Feb. 21st

Voices at CPAC 2018 Vicki from Minnesota

Voices at (or near) #cpac2018 Lea from National Association of Developmental Educators We talk Students and Math

DaTechGuy at CPAC 2018 The Calm Before the Storm and What I’ll be Asking

If you don’t want to wait or my blog posts to see my interviews my youtube channel is here.

Full CPAC 2017 list (for those who feel nostalgic) is here

A reminder I have copies of my Book Hail Mary the perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer available at CPAC with me, price $7 and I will happily sign them for you.

Or you can just order it on Amazon


If you’d like to continue to support independent journalism, help defray the $140 a month extra I’ll need for my new hosting site) and think my CPAC 2018 reporting is worthwhile please consider hitting DaTipJar here.



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Finally might I suggest my book Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift.

The subtitle of this book, Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American left, is the only thing I dislike about this book.  The statement is accurate but incomplete because it is missing the word modern when referring to the American left.  Progressivism in America predated the Nazi party and was more closely influenced by Italian Fascism.  Actually, the fascism of Italy and the progressivism of America closely influenced each other and are very much related.  That is well documented in this book.  A much more accurate subtitle would be: The incestuous relationship between American Progressivism, Fascism, Socialism, and Nazism.

This book begins with a discussion on transference which is accurate but dull.  It gets much better after that.  The opening chapter  documents the explosion of calls that President Trump and conservatives are Fascist and Nazis, and how these accusations have been used as justification for acts of violence against Trump supporters at rallies and against speakers on the political right.

The Big Lie most correctly points out that fascism, Nazism, progressivism, socialism, and communism are all related and on the political left.  D’Souza uses two authors that I have read extensively to back up this claim – FA Hayek and Jonah Golberg.  Here are three quotes, the first is from page 23 and the other two are from page 24:

Hayek identified Fascism as a phenomenon of the Left, a cousin of socialism and progressivism

Golberg traces innumerable links between progressivism and fascism, spelling out the left wing laundry list in both the platforms of Mussolini and Hitler, and then showing their parallel in modern progressivism.

Hayek and Goldberg are the starting point for my book. But I go much further and delve into areas of inquiry untouched by them.

D’Souza documents how the Nazis actually learned very negative lessons from the American left.  Here is one from page 27

Forced sterilization and euthanasia aimed at eliminating racial “defectives” and producing a “superior” Nordic race were two additional schemes the Nazis got from American progressives.

Chapter 2 is devoted to the distortion of the political spectrum.  D’Souza documents how the political spectrum used by most journalists and the general public is meaningless because it was based on seating arrangements during the French revolution, where those who supported the ideals monarchy sat on the right and those who opposed it sat on the left.  He discusses a more accurate political spectrum which is based on the components of the political philosophies and the effects they have on the size and scope of the government that implements them.  Here are quotes from pages 31 thru 34 page which illustrate the differences between conservatives, which are on the actual political right, and progressives, which are on the political left.

The American Revolution was characterized by three basic freedoms: economic freedom or capitalism, political freedom or constitutional democracy, and freedom of speech and religion.

By limiting state power conservatives seek among other things to protect the right of the people to keep the fruits of their own labor

The left in America is defined by its hostility to the restrictions placed  by the founders on the federal government.  That’s why leftists regularly deplore constitutional restraints on government power, proclaiming the constitution woefully out of date and calling to adopt instead a living Constitution…

.,,progressives distrust the free market system and want the government to control and direct the economy, not necessarily nationalizing or taking over private companies, but at least regulating their operations  and on occasion mandating their courses of action.

Also in this chapter D’Souza introduces readers to Giovanni Gentile of Italy, who was the father of fascism.  His principles of fascism included: opposition to individual rights, the belief that he State is far more important than the individual, there is no distinction between private and public interests, and control of businesses through regulation.   Discussed in great detail is how Mussolini implemented fascism.

Chapter 2 finishes up with a discussion how the original platform of the Nazi party resembled the platform championed by progressives.  Here is a quote from page 60.

The Nazi party at the outset offered a twenty-five point program that included the nationalization of large corporations and trusts, government control of banking and credit…universal health care and education.

Chapter 3 discusses how Mussolini transitioned from socialist to fascist, which is common because of the failures of socialism, including the fact that it did not happen in wealthy nations

Chapter 4 documents American progressive ideas that inspirited Nazis.  Discussed and documented is the fact that the Indian removal under Democrat Andrew Jackson served as a model for the Nazi Lebensraum.  It was noted that slave plantations in the Democrat controlled  US South were similar to Nazi work camps, but there was no documented link.

Chapter 5 is titled  The Original Racists.  This chapter opens with the following quote. which is from Racism a Short History by George Fredrickson.

it was with the passage of the Nuremberg Laws in 1935 that Germany became a full fledged racist regime.  American Laws were the foreign precedents for such legislation.

Here are two quotes from this chapter which are found on page 132 and 133:

Racism, of course, preceded the Democrat Party but the Democrats, in a sense, invented political racism in the early 19th century to defend slavery.

Even after slavery ended , Democrats found racism to be very useful…They constructed a whole ideology, and structure of white supremacy in order to establish their political domination of the south.

This chapter also documents the similarities between the KKK and brown shirts including the fact that the Brown Shirts and Klan considered themselves to be champions of social justice

Chapter 8, Politics of Intimidation, illustrates the Nazi roots of modern American progressivism.  D’Souza documents on page 202, that political correctness is the progressive equivalent of Nazi Gleichschaltung, which was the “doctrine of political uniformity and social control.“   The most damming evidence that modern progressivism has its roots in Nazism is centered around this quote on page 204

Ever since the publication of his opus, Being and time, Martin Heidegger’s philosophy has been widely influential.  Specifically, it provides intellectual grounding for a whole series of progressive causes.

D’Souza discusses how this work inspired the leftist academic movement called deconstructionism.  Heidegger was an environmentalist, anti- capitalist, and founder of identity politics.  This work also inspired the belief that freedom of speech is a myth and offensive speech should be met by violence.  As you can see, Heidegger, who was a Nazi, provided the intellectual basis for political correctness and Antifa.

In the chapter Denazification, D’Souza discusses how the big lie, blaming conservatives for the sins of leftists, was created and spread by academia, the news media, and Hollywood.

This book is extremely well documented and well written.  I have encountered all of the subject matter many times before.  I only take issue with several solutions to the Big Lie that D’Souza  shares in the final chapter.   His solutions are based a bit too much on anger rather logic and principle.  It is a book most definitely worth buying and reading more than once.

If you believe the mainstream media and Hollywood celebrities, you’d think Americans with faith in God are fools, stooges or nutcases. But nothing can be further from the truth.

Until recently, progressives kept their disrespect for religious faith under wrap, but today they openly ridicule people who offer prayers for the victims of tragedies. They have no qualms about belittling individual believers like Vice President Mike Pence, whose faith in Christ was attacked by the cast of “The View” a few days ago.

Fortunately, I come in contact with a radically different America every week.

For nearly three years, I have been a patient visitor for the Spiritual Care Center at a local hospital. I’ve visited nearly 3,500 patients and countless loved ones while making my weekly rounds. In all that time, only 12 people have spurned me after I identified myself as a faith-based visitor. The rest have welcomed me with warmth and gratitude.

That’s certainly not what I expected when I started. When I report to the center, I’m given a list of patients, their room numbers and their church affiliation. From the first day, the church affiliation for at least half the patients was “None.”

But that information proved to be misleading. I found out many were uncomfortable about telling the hospital about their church, and the others professed a strong faith in God even if they weren’t currently active church-goers.

A good number of patients were surprised the hospital provided spiritual services. Almost invariably, they said they hesitated to talk to strangers about their faith because newspapers, internet sites, television and movies implied they were yokels, misguided or psychologically defective. Some said I gave them a chance to talk about God for the first time in ages. Many also expressed relief that they weren’t alone in cherishing their faith secretly.

While I’m not a proselytizer by any means, some have told me my visit has inspired them to rejoin a church.

The overwhelming majority of patients I’ve encountered are Christians, but I’ve also visited Jews, Hindus and Muslims. Only atheists, it seems, are averse to hearing that I will pray that God relieves their pain and grants them a speedy recovery.

I’ve visited a variety of patients, from recovering stroke victims and dementia sufferers to people who have had shoulder, knee or hip replacements. Sometimes, when a person with dementia is agitated, he or she will calm down and join me when I recite the Lord’s Prayer. That’s when I see the power of prayer in action.

The patients are as likely to inspire me even more than I do them

One whom I’ll never forget was a woman in her mid-50s who was being visited by two of her sons when I stopped by. She was bursting with laughter while the men sat grim-faced in chairs at her bedside.

She continued laughing as she greeted me. Rarely had I seen a patient in such high spirits, but her story was anything but funny. She had been diagnosed with cervical cancer a few months earlier and had been told earlier that day that the cancer had spread to several vital organs. Before I walked in, she had been arguing with her sons about her future treatments.

Her sons were trying to persuade her to forgo the agony of surgery and chemotherapy, but she would have none of that.

“My mother had the same kind of cancer, so I’m thinking it’s probably genetic,” she told me. “If I go through all these treatments, they might find one that works. I owe it to my kids and grandkis to help find a cure if this really something that I’ve passed on to them.”

I found myself a new hero that day.

Yes, visiting the afflicted is a two-way street. And I can’t think of a better way of learning how everyday folks are bolstered by their faith in God even when the mainstream media offers them nothing but mockery and disrespect.

By:  Pat Austin

Instagram logo

SHREVEPORT —  As a high school educator I have spent the last several years of my career lamenting the distraction that is social media in the classroom.  When I started teaching twenty-two years ago I didn’t own a cell phone.  Not many of my students did either and at that time I taught in a school with a fairly affluent student body.

Things have changed.

Schools have struggled with the rapid advancement of this technology, too.  Initially, the devices were banned from school, then banned from the classroom, then banned from being visible (“we know you have a phone, just keep it in your purse or backpack so it’s not a distraction”), and eventually we’ve ended up where classrooms are embracing cell phone technology.

There are many ways the phones can be used in the classroom and thousands of educational apps that kids can use either independently or as a class activity.

There is always some district policy on phones, then it filters to the school level, then to the classroom and at that point there is a wide diversity of how teachers deal with them.  Some have very strict “no phones!” rules, some have “cell phone jail” systems, and some just don’t care, defeated, and will turn a blind eye to it.

Social media is a big deal: there are 800 million monthly users on Instagram as of September 2017 and half of these users are between 19 and 29 years of age.  For marketing your brand, Instagram is huge, and getting bigger:

Due to the apps visual nature and high user engagement rate, Instagram is also a valuable social media marketing tool. As of March 2016, 98 percent of fashion brands had an Instagram profile. As of December 2016, average number of image brand posts on Instagram was 27.9 posts per month.

This is not your Snapchat teenager group.  As of January 2017, there were 300 million Snapchat users.  Forty-five percent of Snapchat users are between 18-24 years old.

As for Facebook, research shows that people use Facebook primarily for keeping up with family and friends. With two billion monthly active users, Facebook is still alive and well.

Twitter is still huge with over 300 million active monthly users, but Twitter’s growth has stalled.  Twitter is still very popular for news sharing and for celebrity stalking.  With American presidents using Twitter to broadcast policy these days, it’s impossible to deny Twitter’s viability, but there are some troubling signs:

Despite a steady revenue growth – the company’s 2016 revenue amounted to 2.5 billion U.S. dollars, up from 2.2 billion in the preceding fiscal year – Twitter has yet to report a positive net income. In 2016, it’s annual net loss amounted to almost 457 million U.S. dollars.

These are all very big numbers and it’s clear that social media is the new frontier for pushing your brand.  I’ve spent some time researching Instagram over the past few days and experimenting with my own feed.  I started an Instagram account several years ago only to keep up with photos of my new grandson who lives in another state.  I never posted to it and had about thirty followers.  I just enjoyed looking at everyone else’s photos. Now I’m engaging with the platform more and the followers are coming fast. (In the Instagram world I’m barely a blip on the radar when it comes to followers.)

It’s easy to see why Instagram is such an engaging platform.  Everyone has their own niche and the big brands and celebrities are there as well.  Currently, National Geographic has over 86 million followers.  Nike is right behind them.  Celebrities with huge followings include Selena Gomez with 133 million followers and Beyonce with 111 million followers.

On a more real level, people are using Instagram more than ever to promote their brand.  Consider Hilary Rushford, New York stylist and former Radio City Rockette, who decided a day job cubicle wasn’t for her and formed the Dean Street Society which is a motivational company helping people develop the best of themselves, whether it’s personal style, entrepreneurship, defining a business model, or marketing. She has 167 thousand followers and is growing fast.

So back to the classroom: how does this all tie in?  The kids in my classroom have never known a life without digital technology.  They are totally connected and invested in their phones.  Teachers today must find a way to make that work for you instead of against you.  It’s hard to engage a kid in the merits of Macbeth when they’re more interested in the latest cat video on YouTube or taking a selfie with a cute Snapchat filter.  The reality is there.  As educators we have to embrace it and work with it,  otherwise you are doomed to one semester after another of frustration.  There are many ideas out there to help figure out ways to engage students through social media.

Social media is here to stay, and it’s growing.  Make it work for you, whether you’re in the classroom or promoting your brand, blog, or posting a cat video.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.  Follow her at instagram.com/patbecker25

You’ve likely heard or seen the video of criminals in Chicago cheering an inmate who murdered a high ranking police officer.

What I don’t understand is why anyone is surprised that they were cheering or even shocked by it?

On campus’ , at political rallies, and though the MSM it’s been made clear that the police are the enemy, that they are not to be trusted and to be hated and feared, particularly by people of color.

Furthermore  members of both media and academia have expressed support for Antifa the violent thugs who often clash with or intimidate police.

All of those things have been done publicly for the last several years, and yet people are still shocked when inmates cheer the murder of police.

Go ahead, ask any democrat particularly one who might run in a majority-minority district if they condemn those inmates and what them add a caveat condemning police actions if they say anything at all.

The wonder isn’t that these inmates are doing so, the wonder is we haven’t reached the point where candidates for the left aren’t joining in the cheers, because once they decide it is a necessary part of winning an election, they will fight to see who can clap the loudest.

I predict this will happen in my lifetime, and frankly I wouldn’t be surprised to see it before the next presidential election and if the me of today told me that would be the case 10 years ago I wouldn’t have believed him.

President Obama, AG Holder, MSM take a bow.

A quick google search turns up the statistic that 70% of lottery winners go broke within just a few years. As the recent Mega Millions and Powerball jackpots got up over $1 Billion a few weeks ago, I confess I bought a couple of tickets and allowed my mind to wander to what I might do with the winnings (while assuring myself that I would definitely be in the 30%). Right around this time, the immigration discussion started involving the Visa Lottery and it got me thinking.

I recalled the Uber driver I met down in DC who came to our country by winning the Visa Lottery. This fellow was industrious, friendly, spoke English very well and was going to college as well as driving. My first instinct on meeting him, was that the Visa Lottery was a great program if it brought over folks like him to the US. But actually, the program would only serve the interests of the US if everyone who came through the Visa Lottery were as hard working as this guy. Sadly, that is not the case, nor is it even possible when visas are allotted by chance. Unfortunately, this is one lottery where the “house” loses.

I happen to agree with Bobby Jindal who said in the 2016 campaign that “Immigration without assimilation is invasion.” The biggest difference I’ve noticed in immigration between now and earlier generations is that back then, immigrants came to this country to be Americans. Sadly that doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. On Ellis Island, within sight of the Statue of Liberty (the same one that Chuck Shumer and Nancy Pelosi think is crying because Donald Trump is president), immigrants who risked more than just money and time to come here from overseas were often denied entry due to disease or other criteria which basically boiled down to whether they would benefit the US or would be a burden on our society. Why is that now a bad thing? And how could allowing such a burden to then bring over his relatives – and their relatives – who will simply be a larger burden, be a good idea?

Yes, we are a nation of immigrants. But we’re a nation of Americans too. Our nation was founded on the ideas of equality, God-given rights and limited government. Our founding documents were written in English. Yes, there’s plenty of room for diversity of all kinds, including opinion, in our society, but is it too much to ask that immigrants who want to come here be equally committed to our founding principles and contribute to the General Welfare? I’m sure that a rational immigration system would allow folks like that Uber driver to be at the head of the line and I’d be right there to welcome him to his new home.

It’s just this war and that Lying son of a bitch Johnson

Wesley: Things got a little out of hand. It’s just this war and that lying son of a bitch Johnson and…I would never hurt you. You know that.

Forest Gump 1994

Hours before the most optimistic state of the union speech I’ve ever heard, Ruth Marcus Mayer at the Charlotte Observer wrote about a revelation that struck her on the way to the Woman’s March in the form of a good Samaritan and a car issue in a piece titled: My hatred of Donald Trump has been bottomless. Then my car broke down outside the Women’s March in DC..

This is a story of Resistance meeting reality. It contains may gems worth an old fashioned fisking.  Let’s examine them in order:

I wanted to be with people who shared my anger. Because I have been so angry about Donald Trump this past year. I have been angry at my country for electing this man, angry at my neighbors who support him, angry at the wealthy who sacrificed our country and its goodness for tax breaks, angry at the coal miners who believed his promises…My fury has been bottomless. I drink my morning coffee from a cup that says, “I hate to wake up when Donald Trump is President.” My husband and I, while reading the latest Trump news, routinely turn to each other and mutter, “I just hate him so much.”

Look at this Anger and Hate, hate and anger, ever single day. You would think someone’s life was more than who is in the White House but apparently not.

After the march, Katherine and I hit the road in the late afternoon, feeling good; we had done our part to express our outrage. We were about 90 minutes south of D.C. when I heard a terrible popping sound. I assumed I had blown a tire and headed toward the nearest exit. The popping was followed by screeching – were we now driving on metal? Luckily, there was a gas station right off the exit and I pulled in.

All the righteous liberal anger doesn’t do a thing when you have a car problem

Before I could do anything but park my grey Prius, a man rushed over. He looked like a mechanic in his well-worn overalls. “I heard you coming down that road,” he said. Before I could say much he started surveying the situation. He didn’t so much offer to help us as get right to work.

I love this sentence, first we find out she is driving a Prius which is apparently standard equipment for an upper middle class liberal, but notice that a man rushes over to help. Apparently he never got the memo that masculinity is “toxic” and that by rushing over to help he is reinforcing old harmful outdated memes on the roles of men and women.

He did all of this so quickly that I didn’t have time to grab the prominent RESIST sticker on the side of my car, which suddenly felt needlessly alienating. As this man lay on the ground underneath my car with his miracle zip ties, I asked if he thought they would hold for four more hours of driving.

Notice the difference here, this man didn’t see that “resist” sticker on her car and decide “the hell with this liberal, let her wait for AAA” or have bottomless anger toward her. Oh and pro-tip, if you were actually part of a “resistance” then you wouldn’t have that sticker on your car for fear of your life, let alone attend a public rally with thousands or even tens of thousands to openly protest against the government.

“Just ask any redneck like me what you can do with zip ties – well, zip ties and duct tape. You can solve almost any car problem. You’ll get home safe,” he said, turning to his teenage son, who had been standing nearby. “You can say that again,” his son agreed.

The whole interaction lasted 10 minutes, tops. But that good Samaritan – I never learned his name – was a man of his word: Katherine and I made it home safely.

Contrast this self-proclaimed Redneck, teaching his son by example and sharing the joys and value of mercy, chivalry and love of neighbor just hours after the woman he helped shared and celebrated with her daughter the joy of anger and hatred.

As I drove home, I felt the full extent to which Trump has actually diminished my own desire to be kind. He is keeping me so outraged that I hold ill will toward others on a daily basis. Trump is not just ruining our nation, he is ruining me. By the end of the drive, I felt heartbroken.

Look at the buck passing here. Her lack of kindness that has in her word diminished and/or ruined isn’t HER fault it’s all because of Trump.

When my husband and I first moved to Charlotte eight years ago, I liked to tell people that our neighborhood represented the best impulses of America. In our little two-block craftsman-home development, we had gay and straight families and people of every political persuasion from liberal to moderate Republican to Tea Party, and we all got along. We held porch parties in the summer time and a progressive dinner during Christmas. It wasn’t perfect, but for the most part it worked. We put being a cohesive neighborhood above politics.

How about that, she admits her tea party and moderate republicans somehow didn’t use the presidency of Barack Obama, no matter how much they might have disliked it or even hated it, as an excuse to stop being neighborly toward other who thought differently…

But this year, I realize, I have retreated from my porch.

Note the contrast here, Obama is president, republican/teaparty neighbors remain neighborly, Trump gets elected she retreats.  That suggests if the tables were turned and it was them potentially stranded with a Make America Great Again sticker on a pickup she might have thought: “Serves them right!” and happily driven away.

I want to come away from the march with that very simple lesson, but it begs this question: How do we hold onto the fire and the outrage that fuels our resistance to all of the cruelty that Trump is unleashing, but also embrace the world with more love?

I wish I knew the answer.

The answer is very plan, Trump hasn’t released cruelty or hatred or anger, you have. You have chosen the fires of outrage over love, you have decided to define yourself by this anger.  You’ve turned your politics into your religion and the religion of liberalism can not handle heretics, particularly when out of power.

If you have embraced bottomless hatred the problem isn’t Trump, it’s you, on the plus side you gained an insight thanks to the gift of your car problem and the redneck helping you.  This means you just might still be capable of looking at yourself in the light of truth, and recognizing what you’ve become is the first step in getting out of the trap of anger and hatred.

Don’t be this guy.

Update: For some reason I saw Ruth Marcus rather than Ruth Meyer on this piece proving that while staying up all night with your sick wife is a good idea, publishing a post while doing so not so much.  My very bad and apologies to Ms. Marcus thanks to Don Surber for spotting that.

Update 2:  fixed type on 2nd to last paragraph, Anger not Answer.


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Finally might I suggest my book  Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer makes an excellent Gift.

by baldilocks

Are the days of the famous University of Notre Dame mascot numbered? Some dude at ESPN hopes so.

During a debate Tuesday over the Cleveland Indian’s recent decision to drop their “Chief Wahoo” logo, ESPN “First Take” host Max Kellerman argued the Notre Dame Fighting Irish mascot is offensive as well.

Kellerman said he is personally thanked every time he visits a reservation for his public opposition to Native-American mascots in sports.

“When I go to Native-American reservations around the country to call fights, I am approached—I’ve received feathers [Ed.: really?] in honor and letters saying, ‘Thank you for your stance,'” he said.

Based on that anecdotal evidence, he dismissed a Washington Post survey that found nine out of 10 Native-Americans are not offended by team names like the NFL’s Washington Redskins. (…)

“Many Irish-Americans are not offended, but many are. And should that also change? The answer is yes, unequivocally yes,” Kellerman said, as his guest Will Cain groaned and facepalmed.

I’m with ya, Will.

As an honorary holder of the Irish Card – it’s the O thing – I have permission to speak on this: are you fecking kidding? Some of my best friends are straight-from-the island Irish! (Yes, I played that card, too.) I can’t wait to tell them about it. They will laugh their butts off.

Back when the Redskins were under fire for their mascot, someone asked me what I would do if a professional sports team decided to change its mascot to, say, the New England Zulu Nation.

Answer: buy a jersey.

All cheekiness aside, this is getting out of hand.

Next? To name a few …

Boston Celtics.

Minnesota Vikings.

New York Yankees.

My high school alma mater, the LA Romans. /gratuitous

And, definitely the LA Raiders and the Pittsburg Pirates. Pirates were and are often Muslim.

Watch and see.

(Thanks to Ed Driscoll)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

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I don’t normally watch cable news, but on Friday I had no choice. My sponsor at a command I was visiting hadn’t put in a visit request, so I had to sit in the lobby while my credentials were checked. On the TV was CNN, and they were showing their “Pulse of the People” segment, with the topic “Women on Trump.”

As I watched a good ten minutes of this, I picked up on a lot of nasty setup items that put people at disadvantages.

Continue reading “Lacking a pulse of real people”