by baldilocks

I watched the 1977 version of Roots during its originally showing, having read Alex Haley’s “autobiography” beforehand. I was 16 years old when the original came out.

Viewing the series was a family gathering in my home, as was so for many black families, I’m told. It was a celebration of sorts. I don’t remember much about the viewing except for one thing: during the scene in which Kunta Kinte is captured, everyone in my house became dead quiet.

Burtonkinte
LeVar Burton as Kunta Kinte

LeVar Burton, most widely known for his portrayal of Chief Engineer Geordi LaForge in Star Trek: The Next Generation, had his first professional acting job in the original Roots as the young Kunta Kinte. For the 2016 version of Roots, Burton is the executive producer.

I mention this because I’ve always liked Burton and if I were going to watch the more recent version of Roots, his role in it would be the only reason to do so. As it turns out, it isn’t reason enough.

Call it fatigue at the continual opening of an old wound. Western slavery ended in a very bloody fashion in the 1860s. I’m over it. What I’m not over is the centuries-long enslavement of black Africans and the trashing of their continent by Islamic entities ranging from the Ottoman Empire to 2016’s Boko Haram. When will that movie get made? My guess is that, if it isn’t a self-/fan-funded venture, never.

There is also the fact that many black Africans played an exclusive role in selling members of other tribes to Europeans and to Americans. Those black African salesmen were usually Islamic.

And, oh yes: I see no point in celebrating Haley’s real legacy.

I’ve said before that God sometimes takes the folly of man and uses it to bless others. I think that this is the case with American slavery. For those who wished that their ancestors had remained in Islam-ravished western Africa, I suggest you repent, turn to God and open your eyes to the blessings He has put in front of all of us…and stop crying about the long-dead treachery from those who look like you, and those who don’t.

And if slavery really bothers you that much, there are plenty of organizations who combat 2016 slavery. You should help them or, at “least,” pray for them.

Now, excuse me while I go watch some sci-fi. There’s a reason I like it so much. With this post in mind, see if you can guess what it is.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>baldilocks

By John Ruberry

Zimbabwean president and kleptocrat Robert Mugabe celebrates his 92nd birthday today with private ceremonies, but later this week a much more lavish affair–previous birthday celebrations have cost $1 million–will be held at the Great Zimbabwe archaeological site.

A state-run newspaper, the Sunday Mail, has plastered the nation with yellow-and-black posters that proclaim “Mugabe’s birthday is like that of Jesus Christ” to draw attention to a 16-page supplement about the man who has run Zimbabwe into the ground during his 36-year-long reign of terror and error.

Oh, Mugabe claims to be a Roman Catholic.

The southern African nation is in the midst of drought that has forced three million Zimbabweans–about a quarter of the population–to be dependent upon international food aid. But why let brutal reality ruin a great party?

Zimbabwe is considered one of the most corrupt countries on the planet and Mugabe’s racist–he has driven many of his nation’s productive white farmers from their legally purchased land–and socialist policies have devastated the nation.

John "Lee" Ruberry
John “Lee” Ruberry

Can things can worse? Of course they can. Despite allusions of divinity Mugabe will die and probably pretty soon. Demagogues typically stunt the next generation of leadership and Mugabe is no exception. Already there is squabbling among members of his Zanu PF party because there are many men who look into the mirror every morning and see who they believe is the person who will succeed Mugabe and most likely, continue the plunder, and perhaps, compare himself to Jesus too.

And the unhappy people of Zimbabwe will continue to suffer.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

by baldilocksbaldilocks

UPDATE: The trip dates have been changed to 21-29 February.
ORIGINAL: In less than two weeks—February 14th–I’ll be going to Kenya for the first time, courtesy of an old blog fan-friend who prefers to remain anonymous for now. As I said here, it’s a dream come true. To give you some background on my life and some context on my upcoming trip, I’m linking to one of my very first posts at Da Tech Guy blog, Stranger Than Fiction.

  • I was born in August of 1961.
  • My biological father is Kenyan and of the Luo tribe; my mother is American.
  • My parents met when both were attending the same American college.
  • My parents divorced when I was very young; afterward, my father returned to Kenya.
  • For half of my childhood, I was raised by older relatives of my mother.
  • My mother suffered from ovarian cancer.
  • My maternal grandmother died in 2008.
  • One of my half-sisters is nine years younger than I am. She is married to a man of a different race than she.
  • I am left-handed.

Some of these things may seem familiar, if innocuous. But one thing is certain: all of these things are also part of the biography of a man named Barack Hussein Obama. And some of the dissimilarities have symmetry.

  • I am a woman.
  • I am a conservative.
  • Both of his parents and his step-father are dead. Both of my parents and my step-father are living. (My mother survived her bout with ovarian cancer and yet another battle with that evil malady; my father, Philip Ochieng, appeared in Dinesh D’Souza’s documentary, 2016: Obama’s America, and was a friend of Barack Obama, Sr.)
  • I was raised by my great-aunt and great-uncle in the first half of my childhood. President Obama was raised by his grandparents in the last half of his minor years.

(…)

Here’s the important question: which one of us is the Bearded Spock?

My father and I will be meeting face-to-face for the first time in my memory; he returned to his home country when I was an infant and I did not hear from him until the Internet Age when, at age 35, I went searching for him online. As it turns out, he’s a famous journalist on the entire African continent and, while I’ve achieved only a modest amount of fame through writing, it’s for certain that this acorn has very many attributes of its tree.

Philip Ochieng2
Philip Ochieng

Philip and I have not spoken to each other during most of Barack Obama’s presidency. Yes, it’s about my opposition to that presidency, to that person. But my father is approaching the beginning of his ninth decade on earth and I am eternally grateful that I will have the chance to honor my father at least once.

More in the next post. Oh and, yes, I’ll be posting from Kenya during my two-week sojourn.

ADDED: Kenya Trip Wishlist at Amazon.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

 

The Obama with Jammeh and one of his wives.
The Obamas with Jammeh
and one of his wives.

By John Ruberry

The world has a new Islamic republic. On Friday Gambia’s strongman president, Yahya Jammeh, declared the impoverished west African nation that is almost completely surrounded by Senegal, a Muslim state. Other such nations are Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Mauritania–none of which are well-known for freedom or prosperity.

Jammeh promises freedom of religion to the citizens of Africa’s smallest non-island nation.

Jeffrey Smith, a senior advocacy officer at the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights told Al Jazeera that day, “Gambia is not a country of laws but is rather ruled by the whims of Yahya Jammeh.”

Jammeh seized control of Gambia in a bloodless coup in 1994 and while there have been elections since then, of course in the African tradition he has won each with resounding majorities.

What of those whims that Smith mentioned?

Jammeh detests gays. In speech given earlier this year the despot warned them, “If you do it [in Gambia] I will slit your throat,” adding, “if you are a man and want to marry another man in this country and we catch you, no one will ever set eyes on you again, and no white person can do anything about it.”

In 2007 Jammeh announced that he had developed an herbal cure for AIDS, sometimes he even administers his crackpot treatment to the afflicted.

Freedom of the press is limited in Gambia and the nutjob’s opponents often “disappear.”

Jammeh claimed in 2010–without citing evidence–that both the first Atlantic flight and the first Eastern European flight ended in Gambia.

Despite the dictator’s eccentricities and his terrible human rights record, President Obama welcomed Jammeh and one of his wives to the White House last year.

Is Jammeh Gambia’s answer to Idi Amin?

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse lepers, drive out demons. Without cost you have received; without cost you are to give.

Matthew 10:8

The Doctor: You’re running out of time.
Courtney Woods: For what?
The Doctor: Everything! Human beings have incredibly short lifespans. Frankly, you should all be in a constant state of panic. Tick tock, tick tock.

Doctor Who The Caretaker 2014

 

…As I live, says the Lord GOD, I swear I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked man, but rather in the wicked man’s conversion, that he may live

Ezekiel 33:11a

Via Instapundit a writer at Slate finds himself confused by a reality that his culture can’t understand:

Missionary doctors and nurses are stationed throughout Africa, in rural outposts and urban slums. Rather than parachuting in during crises, like some international medicine specialists, a large number of them have undertaken long-term commitments to address the health problems of poor Africans.

This isn’t news to any faithful Christian .  Any person familiar with history knows  Christians have been the spearpoint of helping others.  In Africa for example the Catholic Church is very active:

 

Church africa

 

The Screen shot come from this video (via sacred space) with figures from dating from 2011.  (In fact we had a 2nd collection in our church two weeks ago to help support this work) and of course these number don’t count activities by various protestant denominations which, while not to the scale of much larger Catholic Church,  are quite commendable.

But all of this brings unease to our secular writer

And yet, for secular Americans—or religious Americans who prefer their medicine to be focused more on science than faith—it may be difficult to shake a bit of discomfort with the situation.

“Focused on science?  Does the writer think Christian doctors are using rattles and bleeding their patents to equalize their humors?

For all that,snark,  the writer, to his credit notices that there is something wrong with how he feels

And yet, truth be told, these valid critiques don’t fully explain my discomfort with missionary medicine. If we had thousands of secular doctors doing exactly the same work, I would probably excuse most of these flaws. “They’re doing work no one else will,” I would say. “You can’t expect perfection.”

I’m not altogether proud of this bias—I’m just trying to be honest.

While this fellow has gotten a lot of grief on comments I’m not bothered by the story because honesty echoed by different liberal writer earlier this week is the first steps to realizing that there is something wrong there is still that inexplicable unease.

Frankly it’s logical that Christians, believing in heaven, hell (and purgatory if Catholic) therefore seeing this life as a transitory phase in their existence might be less adverse to risking said life that others.  Contrariwise it’s just as logical that an Atheist rationally concluding he has but one life, is not about to risk it for a bunch of people thousands of miles away that he’s never met.

Completely logical, completely rational, makes perfect sense, particularly if one has a worldview that morality is relative and not an absolute handed down from on high, but if that’s so why is atheist writer Brian Palmer uneasy about all these Christian Doctors risking their lives fighting Ebola?

That answer is quite simple.

You see the reality is we are created in God’s image, all of us.  Because of that fact even if one has spent a lifetime denying God’s existence, this intrinsic truth of our nature creates, a gut feeling, an instinct a little whisper in the ear saying that maybe, just maybe all we have been conditioned to believe about Christianity as vast wasteland of ignorance & hate by the media, by our circle and by the secular culture might be wrong.

That merest hint that your worldview, celebrated by the dominant media culture is lacking, threatens to divide you away from your comfort zone and is makes the other side in this spiritual battle very nervous and he’s and his friends will fight like ravenous wolves to snuff that spark out.

It’s also means those Christian Doctors are getting it right because creating that discomfort is part of the job description.  I’ll give Christ the last word:

Do not think that I have come to bring peace upon the earth. I have come to bring not peace but the sword.  For I have come to set a man ‘against his father, a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law;  and one’s enemies will be those of his household.’

Matthew 10:34-36

 

I noticed this headline at Reuters

Citing security threat, Obama expands U.S. role fighting Ebola

and this at CNN:

Obama: U.S. ready to take the lead in Ebola fight

Well that’s good, It’s a tough thing when disease is rampant, It’s good to know that the US is going to be taking the lead here. So I presume we will be sending large quantities of medical experts, huge supplies of drugs and supplies to improve sanitary right? 

U.S. Africa Command will set up a Joint Force Command headquartered in Monrovia, Liberia, to provide regional command and control support to U.S. military activities and facilitate coordination with U.S. government and international relief efforts. A general from U.S. Army Africa, the Army component of U.S. Africa Command, will lead this effort, which will involve an estimated 3,000 U.S. forces.

U.S. Africa Command will establish a regional intermediate staging base (ISB) to facilitate and expedite the transportation of equipment, supplies and personnel. Of the U.S. forces taking part in this response, many will be stationed at the ISB.

What? I know that’s the White House site but maybe I read that wrong, let’s check the Daily Mail:

US to send 3,000 troops to Ebola danger zone as Obama administration shuffles military’s mission in Africa
The Obama administration said late Monday night that the U.S. military will set up a command post in Monrovia, Liberia, the Ebola outbreak’s epicenter
‘This effort … will involve an estimated 3,000 U.S. forces,’ according to the White House
Pentagon official says military will ‘be the lead dog, and that will make a lot of people nervous. … No one wants U.S. personnel enforcing someone else’s martial law if things go south and the entire region is at risk’

So we are going to send 3000 troops to fight ebola? What are we going to do, shoot it?

The Pentagon is asking Congress to shift another $500 million in its budget for Ebola response, doubling the amount it’s seeking to spend from its contingency fund to as much as $1 billion, the White House said yesterday.

In all seriousness what does it say about Africa that the solution to Ebola is for the US to establish a military command post in order for Ebola aid to be distributed, and what happens if our Islamic friends decide to send fighters to go after both the US troops and doctors?

And finally what steps are going to be taken to make sure those troops don’t become infected themselves and take the disease back to the US?

by baldilocks

In the wake of the thirteenth anniversary of the Islamic attacks of 9/11, I found myself revisiting the stand at the Gates of Vienna. I had already known about the Battle of Vienna, but, in the Baldilocks minipast, I had glossed over the specifics—the pertinent dates of the stand, September 11-12, 1683, and the leadership role that the King of Poland, Jan Sobieski, played.

The battle was won by the combined forces of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, the latter being represented only by the forces of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland (the march of the Lithuanian army was delayed; as a result they arrived in Vienna after it was relieved). The Viennese garrison was led by Ernst Rüdiger Graf von Starhemberg, an Austrian subject of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor. The overall command was held by the commander of the Polish forces, the King of Poland, Jan III Sobieski.

As it happens, I am reading—or, rather listening to–Timothy Snyder’s Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin, which, highlights the attempt of the two to rid Europe of the Poles. Of course, we know that the Poles were not unique in this respect, but the attempt to exterminate the Poles is particularly ironic in light of the role that the 17th century Polish monarch played in protecting Europe from Islam.

All of the European tribes/nation-states were long-standing enemies to each other, and, in fact, resumed their wars following the successful pushback of the Muslims. Indeed, after the death of Jan Sobieski’s successor, Poland fell into civil war, and a century later, Austria, Prussia and Russia partitioned Poland–which only came back into existence in 1918 at the end of World War I.  As I’ve already alluded to, the 20th century incarnations of the latter three nations would do again on September 1, 1939.

But, the point is that the European kingdoms/national entities united to defeat a common foe: Islam. And, they united under a common banner: Christianity. (Sobieski had been asked by Pope Innocent XI to lead the coalition.)

A couple of days ago, I pointed to the role that Islam played—and is still playing–in the fragmentation of the African continent. Islamic slave raiders have been committing a primitive form of genocide against the hundreds of tribes of Africa for 1400 years and many observers have noted how Africans have failed to develop over these same centuries.

But, if we put all of the information together, we can easily see what a difference unity makes.

One set of tribes united against invaders and their continent flourished, in spite of continual internecine wars. Another set of tribes failed to unite against the same invaders and, as a result, the continent became mired in chaos, slavery and death. The other result: the continent was softened up for colonization by any power seeking to do so.

There’s another difference between the two continents in relation to Islamic incursion and it’s a spiritual one.

[To be continued]

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: novel, Internet, blog fees, and COFFEE

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—–>>>>

 

by baldilocks

This post originally appeared at my old blog in 2010–a response to a person who called me “dumb” and implied that IBaldilocks mini was a “traitor to my race” for opposing the building of the Ground Zero Mosque. That may seem ridiculous on its face, but it points to a deeper deception: that Islam is a “black religion” because of its widespread presence on the African continent.

We have seen the actions of groups like Boko Haram and ISIS as they conquer non-Muslims: they murder/castrate the men and boys and sell the women and girls into sex slavery. What fewer people know is that this is a 1400-year pattern for Islamic conquerors. They are merely following their leader.

And what a minority of black Americans know is that, for nearly that entire time period–well before the European slavers and colonialists noticed the continent–black Africa was continually subject to this Islamic onslaught, with the usual choice offered.  

One might call Islam “Africa’s death,” regardless of the choice each individual black African has made.

In 2008, I posted the following video via YouTube. It had been part of a series which exposed the truth about the Islamic Civilization with special emphasis on the horrors of the Trans-Saharan Slave Trade.  My intent was to counter the exhortations of Barack Obama’s former pastor, Jeremiah Wright, and the like-minded who continue to excoriate America and the rest of Western Civilization for past sins against black African Slaves and Americans of African descent.

Continue reading “The Other Black Genocide”

by baldilocks

With scandal, after scandal, after scandal, after scandal being perpetrated by the Obama Administration—wording intentional–I thought that I would finally take the time to address an issue regarding the reaction to Obama’s acknowledged Kenyan Luo heritage—a heritage which I share.

For the last six years, it seems that everything that Barack Obama has touched or touted fails and that has included the institutions of this country. One might conclude that President Obama’s touch on the very country itself is causing it to fail.

But, the widespread demonization of the Luo tribe of Kenya—that it is an Arab Muslim tribe of slavers– cannot be blamed on the president. (The tribe exists in significant numbers in Uganda and Tanzania as well.)

It seems like a long time ago but I most certainly remember the origin of the notion that Barack Hussein Obama is 50% white, 6.25% black African and 43.75% Arab. It came from a man named Kenneth E. Lamb. Lamb laid out a meandering blog post, sans references, on how he allegedly found this information. I recall sending him an email and commenting on his post. Both my responses refuted his findings and I found it interesting that he had no linked sources to back up his claims. So when I was contemplating this post, I went looking for Mr. Lamb’s post and, lo and behold, the post has been deleted. Perhaps Mr. Lamb had an attack of conscience—though deletion smacks more of cover-up.  But, the damage—the Blood Libeling of the Luo Tribe—had been set in motion. There is always the Web Archive, however, and thank God for it.

From February 2008: Continue reading “The Blood Libeling of the Luo Tribe of Kenya”

by baldilocks

In honor of Pushkin’s birthday, June 6.alexander_sergeyevich_pushkin

It is one of the ironies of life and history that Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин)—a Russian man partially of African descent–is considered the founder of Russian literature. It is as though the influence of Other was meant to be added to a society which has demonstrated well-documented xenophobia and antipathy toward non- Russians.

 

Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays, creating a style of storytelling—mixing drama, romance, and satire— associated with Russian literature ever since and greatly influencing later Russian writers. He also wrote historical fiction. His The Captain’s Daughter provides insight into Russia during the reign of Catherine the Great.

Born in Moscow, Russia, Pushkin published his first poem at the age of fifteen, and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Imperial Lyceum in Tsarskoye Selo. Pushkin gradually became committed to social reform and emerged as a spokesman for literary radicals; in the early 1820s he clashed with the government, which sent him into exile in southern Russia. While under the strict surveillance of government censors and unable to travel or publish at will, he wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov, but could not publish it until years later. His novel in verse, Eugene Onegin, was published serially from 1825 to 1832.

In other words, Pushkin penned his works in a manner that the normal, every-day Russian could understand and, by doing so, shaped the Russian language in his own image thereafter. Two and a half centuries before him, William Shakespeare played an identical role for the English language. Continue reading “Sons of Russia and of Africa”