It’s not exactly a hot news flash, but here goes.

With all of the media events of recent years that have been molded and shaped by reporters to fit a certain set of narratives, why would anyone not believe that the fix has been in for decades with respect to almost every topic and every persona? After CBS’s Rathergate and the MSNBC reporting shenanigans with respect to the George Zimmerman trial, does anyone really believe that we get the whole story on anything of political or social importance? After the establishment media’s failure to report anything of importance about the background of the man who is now the president of the United States, do we really know about anything which we haven’t observed with our own lying eyes?

When I first began to blog in 2003, I recall how people like former Vice President Al “30 degrees in LA” Gore and  Daily Beast/Newsweek editor Tina Brown reacted to being contradicted by normal people. Cries of “brownshirts” and “StaSi” filled the Internet air. All that specific sort of whining amused me because, as a normal person who has a decent handle on 20th century German history, I knew that both brownshirts and StaSi  were arms of consecutive tyrannical governments. To toss these epithets at private citizens with an opinion, a modem and a laptop (or whatever) was laughable and, it showed that having a degree from distinguished universities did not guarantee that the bearer was able to think at all, much less think anything through. Or so I thought. (For a proper deployment of the Stasi weapon, see one Angela Merkel.)

But now as I think things through once more, I’m not convinced that persons like Brown and Gore—persons of the Left–care that such epithets make no sense when used against their enemies. I forgot that almost all media sagas are carried on for the sake of the type of observer who does not want to find information independently or who cannot/won’t think topics through. Such a person—the low information voter (LIV)–will probably not understand the historical illiteracy of calling a private person ‘a brownshirt’ for mere disagreement. All that matters is that a person of trust calls out his/her enemies as an enemy–as someone to fight against–and that this call falls on as many ears as possible. Brown and Gore were merely painting their targets, just as their political fellows have done before and after them.

All I’m really saying: keep your third eye open.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel,Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in January 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

Last week, when President Obama reverted to the topic of “income inequality,” I was reminded of one of things I used to complain about to God. Why did people who were “worse” sinners than I get the things I’ve always wanted but didn’t have?

Christians are exhorted to keep their eyes on Jesus—the Way, the Truth and The Light–the dispenser of all good things. It is one of the good examples of tunnel vision. Conversely, when one’s eyes are not on the actual source of blessings, but, rather on the perceived blessings of one’s sibling or one’s neighbor, those eyes become blinded by false vision.

You begin to think that God likes others better than He likes you; or you think that God is unfair or that He is really the capricious, randomly-acting god described in other belief systems. Or, you decide that there is no god and that all is fair in “love” and, most especially, in war. You may even begin to believe that those who have been blessed more than you have, got that way by taking your blessings from you. From there, it’s a short road to doing the same– taking what you want by force. Or, perhaps, you will vote for those who promise to do it for you.

More false vision: allegedly, income inequality varies directly with poverty levels. However, no causal chain is ever described and no historical example is ever given for this “calculus” (algebra, actually).

Measuring self against others, whether you come out “better” or “worse,” always leads to folly. If you believe yourself to be better, you become prideful and arrogant—“high and lifted-up.” And if you believe you have come up short, you become angry, bitter, resentful, and, sometimes, violent.

And you become ungrateful.

The Left’s concern for income inequality was always meant to inflame covetousness and all the sins of commission that flow from that source.

Abel knew.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel,Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in January 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

If you missed this week’s DaTechGuy on DaRadio this Saturday and our first hour comparing the situation in Lunenburg and Nelson Mandela plus my argument that we should be playing the Mandela card on the left click here.

If you missed our panel with Janet Aldrich, Dominic Nanni, Juliette (Baldilocks) Ochieng and Joe Mangiacotti, then click here.

Remember each week our panel recommends stories for the week, here is what they brought up:

Joe said we should look out for the results of the NSA panel due out the 15th here is a story from last month on it:

Working in secret like the programs they’re reviewing, five men with high-level security clearances and ties to President Barack Obama will soon deliver a report that’s likely to reshape U.S. government surveillance.

Must admit I wasn’t up on it

Juliette talked about education in California, this story is one that’s getting no press:

More attention must be paid to the California State University system and to the state’s community colleges if California is going to produce the educated workers its economy needs, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom says in a report set to be issued Tuesday.

The report commissioned by Newsom argues that the state is losing its place as a national leader in higher education.

One guess what the solution will be.

Dominic Nanni talked about the sale of the public art collection:

A federal judge ruled Dec. 3 that Detroit met the conditions for Chapter 9 bankruptcy. Now a question that’s been simmering for months is coming to a boil: Should the Detroit Institute of Arts – one of the country’s finest art museums and perhaps the city’s greatest cultural asset – sell some or all of its collection to satisfy creditors?

I’m not a big fan of that idea, you can only sell it once and you can’t replace it and it won’t cover the debt.

Janet story is from Free-Press.net

Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s FISA Improvements Act1 would give the NSA even more authority to monitor our phone calls, text messages and every online move.2

It’s an awful piece of legislation and it must be stopped.

It’s very hard to get freedoms back once lost

And my story is about an interesting lack of memory at the IRS:

The top lawyer for the IRS in the midst of the congressional investigation swirling around the nation’s tax collectors and their admitted targeting of the Tea Party, has responded to a written inquiry, and managed to claim ignorance on 80 different responses, as reported by The Daily Mail of London, England on Dec. 4, 2013.

The willingness of the left to pretend this is no big deal is simply astounding.

Remember don’t miss this week’s show and on the 21st we have our annual Christmas Show with Bishop Reilly

Tomorrow you get an extra dose of DaTechGuy on an extra station.

UPDATE: I’ll be joining Conservatively speaking on WCRN in the 8 AM hour as well. so make sure you tune in!

At 9 AM I will be on Business, Politics & Lifestyles on WCRN AM 830 till 10 AM.

I don’t actually know if I’ll be hosting or be a guest for Gary Goldman but click that links above and tune in anyway and we’ll both find out. Update: I’ll be a guest)

What I DO know if that at noon I’ll be in Needham at the Money Matters studios for this week’s DaTechguy on DaRadio

We’ll talk to Robert Stacy McCain about the Lunenburg rape hoax and the death of Mandela (including the bits of his life people want to forget).

Then will come the Panel, with me and Joe Mangiacotti returning from his absence Baldilocks from the Magnificent Seven, Janet Aldrich  of CRNews and in the Bob Beckel Chair our old Marxist friend Dominic Nanni.

Jjoin the conversation at 888-9-fedora.

Listen in live on FTR Radio

or via our Tune-in Stream for the Money Matters Radio Network

And of course there are the terrestrial stations

WBNW Concord Ma 1120 AM FLAGSHIP

WPLM 1390 AM Plymouth MA

WESO 970 AM Southbridge MA

Oh and some bad news, due to a stroke in the family of the owners of the Pottery Paintin place we will have to reschedule our live broadcast from there.  Please remember the family in your prayers

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Last week, I was talking with some friends and one of them brought up the Washington Redskins mascot controversy. When I suggested that the team’s name be changed to the ‘Washington Negroes,’ it brought the house down.

From there, someone brought up the old Roots miniseries and we got to talking about Alex Haley (1921-1992) the author of the book on which the miniseries was based. In 1978, Haley was sued for plagiarism by Harold_Courlander and the plaintiff won. One of my companions wondered why he hadn’t just published the book as a work of fiction in the first place.

It was then that I was reminded of the historical novel The Dahomean, written by Frank Yerby (1916-1991) and published in 1971. Set in nineteenth-century Virginia, the initial scenario has two white farmers deciding what to name their newly-purchased slave. The slave tells them his African name when asked and speaks only rudimentary English–obviously fresh from his seaborne transport.

The rest of the novel consists of the slave’s memories of his life as a free man in Africa–in the Kingdom of Dahomey. It is fantastic–a great work. (At my first reading of the book I was about twelve years old. I didn’t read it again until I was in my forties, curious to see if my fledgling judgment of the book’s quality held up against my adult reading sensibilities. It did and remains my favorite novel.)

Undoubtedly, Haley was aware of Yerby–an accomplished writer at the time of the publication of The Dahomean–and was also aware of how little commercial success The Dahomean had garnered. (In Yerby’s “A Note to the Reader,” he acknowledges basing his fiction on Melville J. Herskovits’ Dahomey: An Ancient West African Kingdom.) Whether the contemporaneous public showed little interest in such a topic or whether Yerby’s publishers did little to promote Yerby’s novel is unknown. But I suspect that Haley didn’t want a similar obscurity for Roots–published in 1976–and, to that end, decided to pawn it off as an autobiography. No one would find out, he thought. He was correct…for a while. But the truth came out, as it always does.

As for The Dahomean, I’ve always thought it would make a decent movie. In this climate of political correctness, however, the production would certainly have to be independently financed because Yerby’s Dahomeans are, indeed, not politically correct.

As for the present-day climate of racial division and blame for the sins of dead ancestors, Mr. Yerby addresses these things for his own time and I’ll let him speak for himself.

The thoughtful reader will observe that the writer has not attempted to make the Dahomeans either more or less than what they were. He is aware that truth is an uncomfortable quality; that neither the racist, the liberal, nor the advocates of Black Power and/or Pride will find much support for their dearly held and perhaps, to them, emotionally and psychologically necessary myths herein.

So be it. Myths solve nothing, arrange nothing. But then, as the protagonist of this novel is driven in the end to put it, perhaps there are no viable solutions or arrangements in life for any of the desperate problems facing humanity in an all too hostile world.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel,Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in January 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

 

Update:  (DTG) After reading this post all it reminded me of this one at the Corner.

Update:  (JAO) The URL of my personal blog has been updated.

by baldilocks

Please forgive the many “I, me” and “my” references in this post. Readers will understand the apology as they get clued in to the subject.

Assuming that most of Peter’s readers have never heard of me, let me tell you all a bit about myself. I have been blogging under the nom de guerre baldilocks for just a bit over ten years. The main topic has been conservative politics, but I will talk about most anything that strikes my fancy or torques me off…or at least I used to. Haven’t felt so much like blogging since November 2008.

I am an Air Force retiree and, most recently, a novelist. Until the end of last year, my primary concern was the well-being of my great-aunt. She passed away in December of 2012 at age 91. A good, long life.

But there are some other things about me that readers may find…interesting.

  • I was born in August of 1961.
  • My biological father is Kenyan and of the Luo tribe; my mother is American.
  • My parents met when both were attending the same American college.
  • My parents divorced when I was very young;afterward, my father returned to Kenya.
  • For half of my childhood, I was raised by older relatives of my mother.
  • My mother suffered from ovarian cancer.
  • My maternal grandmother died in 2008.
  • One of my half-sisters is nine years younger than I am. She is married to a man of a different race than she.
  • I am left-handed.

Some of these things may seem familiar, if innocuous. But one thing is certain: all of these things are also part of the biography of a man named Barack Hussein Obama. And some of the dissimilarities have symmetry.

  • I am a woman.
  • I am a conservative.
  • Both of his parents and his step-father are dead. Both of my parents and my step-father are living. (My father, Philip Ochieng, appeared in the documentary, 2016: Obama’s America, and was a friend of Barack Obama, Sr.)
  • I was raised by my great-aunt and great-uncle in the first half of my childhood. President Obama was raised by his grandparents in the last half of his minor years.

Since Barack Obama came on the scene almost ten years ago, I have lived in a low-level state of astonishment and I’m not even talking about the type of president he has turned out to be. (That was predictable to anyone who was paying attention.) I’m talking about the personal facts of both our lives.

Considering his character, the notion that he absconded with my identity has come up in my mind a time or two, but there are things that could not be faked–like the malady that beset both of our mothers. My mother was diagnosed several year after his was.

And, in the years since President Obama was elected, I seen all manner of crazy notions pop up about the Luo tribe.

  • That the tribe is mostly Arab. (One look at any of us disputes this. The name ‘Obama’ is Luo, not Arabic. Fun fact: in Dholuo, ‘Obama’ means ‘bent’ or ‘crooked.’)
  • That the tribe is mostly Muslim. (The Luo are 90% Christian–including me. Most Kenyan Luo are Anglican or Seventh Day Adventist.)
  • That the tribe is a “communist tribe.” (That assertion seemed weird, until I remembered that most of the Africans who were educated in Western countries in the sixties–like Barack Obama, Sr. and Philip Ochieng–were sponsored and well-indoctrinated by the Organized Left. My now very conservative mom says that communists were everywhere when my father was courting her.)

And here’s one really crazy notion that the ascent of Barack Hussein Obama has put in motion: that most black American Christians are adherents to the I-deology known as Black Liberation Theology. In reality, the only black American Christians who are even familiar with the tenets of that abomination are the minority who are Catholic. Nothing against our Catholic friends, but it is in that denomination where (insert ethnic group here) liberation theologies have mostly taken root, the fact that President Obama’s old “church” is “Protestant” notwithstanding.

But I digress.

What does having a cosmic twin who happens to be the President of the United States and who happens to be systematically destroying that same person’s country do for one’s psyche? It brings humility and, ironically, it also shows that there is a God and that He does have a “wicked” sense of humor. Joke’s on me…and, as it appears, the rest of us.

Here’s the important question: which one of us is the Bearded Spock?

I guess that depends on whom you asked. If you were to ask President Obama, he’d get the fictional character confused with the real-life Dr. Spock. And then, you would have your answer.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012.

Update: (DaTechGuy) I’m a little less shy than Juliette about pushing the book

I just finished reading conservative talk-show host Larry Elder’s Dear Father, Dear Son: Two Lives… Eight Hours–an autobiographical story of Larry’s relationship with his father, Randolph. It’s a tough, unflinching and, ultimately, a tear-inducing read, one which I finished in two days.  Having listened to two incarnations of Larry’s LA-based radio show for many years, his spare, straight-forward “voice” comes through in the writing very strongly.

The life story of Randolph Elder is emblematic of an era of hardship, of poverty and overt racism.  The illegitimate child of an indolent and hard-hearted mother–he never found out who his biological father was–Mr. Elder was on his own at age thirteen.

But from that time until he was well into his eighties, he worked and worked and worked–using the strong back, skilled hands and innate intelligence that God gave him. And having taken on the responsibilities of a wife and producing three sons, he made it his business to see that they had what he wasn’t given—at least financially.

But, his adversity-born hardness and determination had a drawback: he did not know how to relate to his wife and his sons on a personal level. And this very sweet story written by his famous middle son, documents the hatred his children had for their father, the confrontation between Larry and Randolph, the reconciliation, and, most importantly, the love that these two men learned to feel and express toward each other.

Some politics are in the story, but they play only an incidental role; the primary topics in this story are communication, understanding and forgiveness.

God commands that His children honor their mother and father and, I believe that the younger Mr. Elder has, through writing this story, done so.  May we all be so blessed to understand and, if need be, forgive our parents.

 

We continue our field guide with everyone’s favorite Luo American Baldilocks

She is absolutely correct about Col West. Incredible is not a word strong enough to describe him, but then again she is a very perceptive person.