I heard anecdotes about a man with a pro-life sign being assailed during the recent Boston demonstration/counterdemonstration, and then found that an Esquire writer tweeted a short video of the incident.    (Language alert.)

The guy was carrying a poster with photos of preborn human beings on the upper half of the poster, visible in the video. (I should add that these were not bloody-baby pictures. If there were any photos of aborted remains on the lower part of the poster, I didn’t see them due to the camera angle.) He was pursued – or as the Esquire writer put it, “made to part ways with his sign” – by masked assailants, who tore the photos off the poster one by one. Among the screaming voices was a woman’s, saying something that sounded like “I chose to have my baby but I’m glad I had a choice!”

At least that particular woman had the integrity to speak her mind without hiding behind a mask and without vandalizing anything.

In Pete’s coverage of the recent Boston demonstration/counterdemonstration,   he noted that the unifying factor among the disparate “counter” groups was anti-Trump sentiment to a greater or lesser degree. I don’t dispute that. I think that sentiment was accompanied by more than a dash of abortion advocacy, of a kind that was around long before Trump and will sadly be around long after he moves on.

I have no idea who the man with the poster supported for President; perhaps like me he’s at risk of being hashtagged #NeverTrump. Those masked hooligans who vandalized his sign didn’t care. The evidently harbored antipathy to the right to life and to anyone promoting it. Trump didn’t even need to be a factor for them.

That was one incident, involving relatively few people, in a place where tens of thousands of people had congregated for various purposes. Maybe the masked vandals who tore up photos of the preborn humans weren’t representative of the larger crowd. Then again, maybe they were.

Mayor and President alike tweeted approval of the day’s peaceful demonstrators speaking out against hate. It was a day for broad strokes, not fine details, so maybe incidents like the one I’ve described escaped the politicians’ notice.

But is it something other than hate when masked people carrying sticks menace a man holding a poster? Is it peaceful to rip up a sign someone’s holding, as long as no one sustains physical injury?  I’m pretty sure that if I, as a pro-lifer, were to tear up a sign held by someone, I’d be charged with simple assault under the laws of my state. (Rightly so, I might add.) Maybe the Boston police had to pick their battles, so to speak, and sign-ripping wasn’t a law enforcement priority the day of a mass rally. Understandable, from a tactical point of view. But I believe the Boston sign vandals got a pass that wouldn’t have been afforded to anyone tearing up a pro-abortion sign.

Readers, please take a moment to read Da Tech Guy’s pinned post, and then hit Da Tip Jar in support of independent journalism. Thank you!

Ellen Kolb is a writer and pro-life activist living in New Hampshire. Read more of her work at EllenKolb.com/blog.

I’ll have a lot to say about events in Boston tomorrow with photos, video and several interviews to round it out. But before I upload those videos and do anything else let me give one thank-you and two shout outs.

First thank all those who consented to interviews (either recorded or not) and gave me some of your time. You were all a pleasure to meet.

Now two shout outs. The primary shoutout goes to the all the Police present.

Unlike Chancellorsville the Boston/State and other Police were present and on the ball. While I didn’t like that I was unable to approach the primary rally and cover what people were actually saying which had been my goal, they did yeomans work to keep people safe and prevent those who would have liked to have cracked heads (and believe me there was a significant number of people there with that goal) in check.

So to all the police there, the Boston Police, the State Police, the Transit Police and even the Police who were guarding the parking garage, you symbolized the best of both Boston and Law enforcement and I tip my Fedora to you.

The second shoutout goes to a set of young college age ladies that I don’t know.

By the time I standing in the subway car back heading back to the parking garage at Alewife Station my body, which had gone all day without food or water on a hot day while running all around the Boston Common covering the story, finally had its say. I found myself suddenly dizzy and nauseous and had to sit, so I lowered myself to the floor taking my laptop bag and camera off from around my neck. Immediately three young ladies standing next to me were at my side offering me water and a fourth offered me her seat.

All of these ladies had been at the protest and were carrying signs to that effect. I suspect none of them were Trump supporters or shared anything close to my political views.

But here, away from the crowd, their concern wasn’t with who I voted for or what I thought of the various event I had seen. All they saw was a fifty something man in some distress and wanted to help, our common humanity overrode everything else.

They did me a great service, not only by giving me a hand but by reminding me not to judge all those in attendance by the signs they carried or by the lowest common denominator of a crowd at a time when I most needed that reminder.

In this age of division it was a breath of fresh air. Ladies I tip my fedora to you


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