A protestor in Tulsa with two members of the local police force (Courtesy of the Tulsa World)
A protestor in Tulsa with two members of the local police force (Courtesy of the Tulsa World)

Faith in God. Faith in the community. Faith in the system. That is why Tulsa, Oklahoma, didn’t devolve into race riots after the shooting of a black man by a white police officer.

Many residents took to the pews, while other cities, facing similar issues, took to the streets with looting and riots. Tulsa, often called “the buckle of the Bible belt,” is different because of its faith. Southern Baptists and evangelical Christians play a significant role in the community of 400,000 people. Oral Roberts University has its campus there.

The ethnic makeup of the city parallels that of the nation. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, slightly more than 60 percent of the population is white; 15 percent is African-American, and 14 percent is Hispanic.

The city has had its racial troubles, including a major riot many years ago. The police have faced both positive and negative reviews over the years.

“This is tragic–and something all of us should spend time reflecting on so we can make a better nation,” the Rev. Teron Gaddis, representing the Oklahoma Baptist State Convention, said. “This is not a race issue, a Caucasian or black issue.”

The reverend is black. Had a white leader said the shooting of a black man was not a racial issue he would have been chastised for taking up the “All Lives Matter” banner.

Even The New York Times and CNN had to admit that religion played a role in keeping the peace. Still, the media provided wall-to-wall coverage of the upheaval in Charlotte, with only a passing reference to the peaceful scenes from Oklahoma, including a Black Lives Matter protester holding hands with a white and a black police officer.

Everyone needs to look at Tulsa as an example of how to stop racial division. Riots don’t work; prayer does.


Christopher Harper, a recovering journalist with The Associated Press, Newsweek, ABC News and The Washington Times, teaches media law.

christrio

Even with the iconic statue of Jesus Christ watching over the Rio Olympics, NBC and mainstream media outlets have chosen to ignore the importance of religion among athletes.

For example, swimmer Michael Phelps, one of the greatest Olympians ever, lost his way until he found God a few years ago.

“I was a train wreck. I was like a time bomb, waiting to go off. I had no self-esteem, no self-worth. There were times where I didn’t want to be here. It was not good. I felt lost,” Phelps said.

After his second DUI, Phelps got a call from former NFL star Ray Lewis, who helped the swimmer onto the road of religious recovery.

Simone Biles, the gymnast who won four gold medals, carries a rosary in her warmup bag and lights a candle in church before an event. Instead of emphasizing her religious beliefs, NBC and others talk about her mother, a former drug addict.

Katie Ledecky, a Catholic like Biles, says a Hail Mary before each swimming event and proudly makes her religious views known. Simone Manuel, the first African-American woman to earn a gold medal in swimming, praised God after winning the 100-meter freestyle. Her reference to God got edited out when NBC put up the video on YouTube.

After Usain Bolt of Jamaica, the fastest man in the world, won his third gold medal in the 100-meter sprint, he fell to his knees to pray. The NBC commentators apparently couldn’t bring themselves to utter the word “prayer.”

Many other examples exist, but NBC and other mainstream media have focused on less significant details of athletes’ lives rather than their trust in God. Fortunately, faith-based news organizations have chronicled what the athletes themselves consider their most important characteristic: their belief in God.

The Christian Post wrote about U.S. athletes and their faith at http://www.christianpost.com/news/10-christian-team-usa-athletes-at-rio-olympics-2016-who-put-god-first-167556/

Eric Metaxas interviewed religion writer Terry Mattingly about God and the Olympics at https://soundcloud.com/the-eric-metaxas-show/terry-mattingly-5


Christopher Harper, a longtime journalist with The Associated Press, Newsweek, ABC News and The Washington Times, teaches media law. Read more at www.mediamashup.org

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A note from DaTechGugy:
I hope you enjoyed Christopher Harper’s piece. Remember we will be judging the entries in Da Magnificent tryouts by hits both to their post and to DaTipJar. So if you like Christopher Harper’s work, please consider sharing this post, and if you hit DaTipjar [on the right] because of it, don’t forget to mention Chris’ post is the reason you did so. In case you missed his other pieces, here they are:

Budding reporters and politics
Give terrorists what they deserve: anonymity
The ‘BS’ factor

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This just in from The New York Times: Journalists are having trouble being objective about Donald Trump.

Seriously?

Here’s what the red, old lady had to say recently:

“If you view a Trump presidency as something that’s potentially dangerous, then your reporting is going to reflect that. You would move closer than you’ve ever been to being oppositional. That’s uncomfortable and uncharted territory for every mainstream, non-opinion journalist I’ve ever known, and by normal standards, untenable.”

The author, media columnist Jim Rutenberg, apparently isn’t much of a reporter or has ignored significant evidence of media bias when he served as the lead reporter on the 2012 campaign and a White House correspondent.

Note: I am not an ardent supporter of Trump. Also, I realize that the readers of DaTechGuy are not surprised by The New York Times’s arrogance and ignorance. But it is noteworthy that Rutenberg actually puts his analysis in writing at http://ow.ly/IOQg3034Bsk

NewYorkerNoted plagiarist Fareed Zakaria made no bones about his attitude about Trump. He simply called the GOP presidential candidate a “bull****” artist on CNN and in The Washington Post.

In the neck-snapping underpinning for his “astute” analysis, Zakaria quoted a Princeton University professor who actually wrote an academic paper entitled, “On Bull****.”

In case you need a definition, a BS-er, “is neither on the side of the true nor on the side of the false. His eye is not on the facts at all . . . except insofar as they may be pertinent to his interest in getting away with what he says.”

It seems to me that the definition applies to Zakaria and many of his fellow travelers in the media.

Christopher Harper, a longtime journalist with The Associated Press, Newsweek, ABC News and The Washington Times, teaches media law. Read more at www.mediamashup.org


A note from DaTechGugy: I hope you enjoyed Christopher Harper’s piece. Remember we will be judging the entries in Da Magnificent tryouts by hits both to their post and to DaTipJar. So if you like Christopher Harper’s work, please consider sharing this post, and if you hit DaTipjar because of it, don’t forget to mention Chris’ post is the reason you did so. In case you missed it, his first piece was Budding reporters and politics. His second was Give terrorists what they deserve: anonymity.

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By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT — Probably nowhere in the world of social media can one find more of a cesspool of rumor, misinformation, immaturity, and drama than on Facebook.

There is maybe some merit for Twitter: I usually get breaking news faster on Twitter than anywhere else.  Tweets are, of course, thankfully limited to 140 characters, which helps minimize the damage one can do.

About the stupidest thing one can do is to get into an argument with somebody on Facebook.  I speak from experience.  In July, I jumped into an argument with “Miss Liberal” about the Hobby Lobby decision and whether or not it restricted personal rights to buy contraceptives.  In my defense, it was only because I was bored and hurtling down the interstate at 75 mph (as a passenger!) on vacation.  “Miss Liberal” insisted that women lost the right to contraceptives in the Supreme Court decision and I made the case that they did not.  “Miss Liberal” was never convinced and finally resorted to insults and personal attacks; I got bored with her and left the conversation.

I should have learned.

Last week I posted the “I’m NOT with Mary Landrieu” picture on my Facebook feed – I thought it was kind of funny.  “Miss Liberal” pops up again with a comment:  “I feel sorry for you.”  Again we get into a “discussion” about the merits of Landrieu.  “Miss Liberal” hurls more personal attacks and insults about my intelligence.  I am, she says, too ignorant to understand.

Again, I left the conversation.

Third strike:  “Miss Liberal” posts some gibberish on her own Facebook feed about how wonderful universal health care is and how the United States is the only country in the world not to provide this wonderful service to its people – and she tagged me in her post.  She called me out and said that I said that I didn’t believe everyone deserved health care.  (I never said that, of course).

This is just silly, right?  I don’t even know this person in real life and don’t know why we are even Facebook friends.  I’ve never met this person.

But she has called me out.  She tagged me.

So I defend my honor; the whole discussion devolves into a definition of the word entitlement.  “Miss Liberal” said that I get entitlements based on my government job.  When I explained to her that I am a school teacher for the state of Louisiana and I pay for every benefit I receive, she said I was ignorant and needed a dictionary.  The whole thing degenerated from there and she was back to insults and attacks which is how most liberals tend to debate, in my experience.

When my husband and another friend jumped in with me to try to explain to “Miss Liberal” the difference between entitlement and benefit, she started deleting our comments.  In this way, of course, it looked like she was winning the debate.

So – we simply went back in and deleted all our comments and I deleted the entire thread because she had tagged me.

It’s all a childish, silly bunch of middle school drama if you ask me.

I only bring it up to point out two things: Facebook is only a breeding ground for such drivel, and know that when you argue with a liberal you will never convince them.  Your argument can be rock solid and backed up with every academic source in the world, but a true liberal will never be convinced because they believe conservatives are cold blooded, unfeeling evil minions of the rich and elite and all of those people are bad.

That doesn’t mean we need to cave in to their ignorance, but just don’t debate them of Facebook.  I’ve sure learned my lesson.

 

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

I was researching my archives for a post I’m planning when I came across this rather prophetic one from Jan 13th 2012, one year ago today

Two years ago it appeared the tide of to progressivism had been stemmed, that the basic philosophy of government being there to take care of the people who served, was rejected.

Instead today we have four more years in the White House, a House retained despite overwhelming odds and here in Massachusetts the decisive senate seat held so long by the lion of liberalism Ted Kennedy back in the hands of the Democratic party where it belongs.

the best advice I can give the GOP is to read the entire thing and remember.

Saturday we have a pair of gets dealing with two big issues

In the first hour our guest is Rosa Korie who will talk about UN Agenda 21

In the Second hour Barbara Espinosa joins us and talks Fast and Furious and a little Arizona inside baseball

You can join us live on WCRN AM 830 at 10 AM EST, you can listen live to the show at wcrnradio.com or via TuneIn

You can tweet us with the hastag #wcrn

And you can call and comment at 508-438-0965 or 888-9-FEDORA.

Or just hit this button during the show

enter your phone number and your phone will ring and if there is an open line you will be connected.

See you Saturday