By A.P. Dillon

Earlier this week, Glenn Reynolds gave some great advice to the GOP in his column at USA Today which blasted Obama and the Democrats pay gap hypocrisy.

If I were the GOP, I’d start running attack ads in these legislators’ home states, quoting President Obama and asking why these Democrats hate women. It just might work — and it would certainly drive home a useful lesson about bogus statistics. Which President Obama — who is now even attacking unequal dry cleaning bills — could use.

Read the whole thing.

Just prior to that paragraph, he mentioned some of the vulnerable Senators out there.

Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado pays women workers 85 cents for every dollar he pays men.

Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana pays women 88 cents on the dollar.

Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia pays women 75 cents for every dollar he pays a man.

Rep. Gary Peters pays women 67 cents for every dollar that a man makes.

And Sen. Mark Begich of Alaska pays women in his office 82 cents for every dollar that a man makes.

I’m adding North Carolina’s Kay Hagan to that list.

Hagan pays her male staffers an average of $15, 343 higher than her female ones. Page 955 of this report is where you can find Hagan’s staff salaries. According to the Washington Free Beacon, Democrat Senate female staffers made 91 cents on the dollar compared to male staffers and the female staff salary was an average of $5,500 less in the last year. Free Beacon noted that in 2011 and 2012, that was also the case. Hagan’s pay gap is nearly triple that. Tsk, tsk Kay…Kay Hagan is quite the hypocrite.

Glenn Reynolds’s column deftly mocks the gender pay gap theme. It should be mocked, it’s ridiculous. The Democrats want everyone to suck in a breath and say ‘how awful! It must be a Republican’s fault!’. A couple years ago, people did. Then the debunking happened and the glaring hypocrisy was exposed.

In trying to resurrect the pay gap theme, Obama’s base and the media are likely banging their heads on their desks. They’ve already had to defend this theme and they lost. Now they’re not fighting it, they’re joining in on the denouncing and re-debunking. I think we’re going to see a failure to re-ignite the old attacks. They just don’t play anymore. Just to underscore this point… Spin, Jay, spin!

Hope and Change!

 

 

If you enjoyed this article, you should really check out other pieces written by Da Tech Guy’s Magnificent Seven writers and maybe hit that tip jar!

AP DillonA.P. Dillon (Lady Liberty 1885), is a Conservative minded wife and mother living in the Triangle area of North Carolina. A.P. Dillon founded the blog LadyLiberty1885.com in 2009. After the 2012 election, she added an Instapundit style blog called The ConMom Blog. Mrs. Dillon’s writing, in addition to Da Tech Guy’s Magnificent 7, can also be found at StopCommonCoreNC.org, WatchdogWireNC and WizBang. Non-political writing projects include science fiction novellas that are, as of yet, unpublished. Her current writing project is a children’s book series.

*********************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

In order for this to be a viable full-time business this blog has to take in enough to make the mortgage/tax payment for the house (Currently $1210 monthly) and cover the costs of the writers writing here (another $255)

We’re $1200 short for the month and we need your help to close that gap.

I think the site and the work done here is worth it, if you do too then please consider hitting DaTipJar below .

Naturally once our monthly goal is made these solicitations will disappear till the next month but once we get 61 more subscribers  at $20 a month the goal will be covered for a full year and this pitch will disappear until 2015.

Consider the lineup you get for this price, in addition to my own work seven days a week you get John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly Fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

If that’s not worth $20 a month I’d like to know what is?

Beanie : $2.00USD – weeklyCap : $10.00USD – monthlyHat : $20.00USD – monthlyFedora : $25.00USD – monthlyGrand Fedora : $100.00USD – monthly

 

LindaTo: The Folks at the Fordham Institute

From: Linda Szugyi

Re: Your Common Core Movie Fact Sheet

Fordham Fact Sheet

Fordham’s Fact Sheet lists thirteen ‘facts’ to counter thirteen ‘false assertions’ in the HSLDA movie about Common Core, Building the Machine.  Here are the first two.  I will continue with the rest in later posts.  My comments are italicized.

1. ASSERTION: THE COMMON CORE WILL NOT BENEFIT CHILDREN.  FACT: NO LONGER WILL A ZIPCODE BE THE LEADING INDICATOR OF WHAT ACADEMIC GOALS A CHILD IS EXPECTED TO REACH.

Since the goal of advancing educational excellence is embedded on Fordham’s logo, the author of this fact sheet probably knows that neither the assertion nor your refutation are statements of fact.  They are both opinion.  I may not be on the staff of an education policy think tank, but I’ve seen the “fact v. opinion” lesson over and over.  My older son’s curricula emphasized it every year, beginning in 1st grade.  The skill of distinguishing between fact and opinion is a favored educational subject these days, and it is fully incorporated in the Common Core Standards.

Perhaps next time, Fordham’s fact checker will follow the example of Mr. Farris, a man who knows the difference between conflicting evidence and differing opinions:  “I think that on balance [David Coleman‘s] proposals are not for the good of the public schools . . . he wants to try to improve the public school system.  He genuinely believes that systemization, centralization, and data collection are good things for kids.” (Building the Machine, 32:00-32:40)

2.  “ASSERTION: THE STANDARDS ARE TOO LOW OR, ALTERNATIVELY, TOO HIGH.  FACT: THE STANDARDS PROVIDE ACADEMIC BENCHMARKS BY GRADE. IF THE BENCHMARKS ARE ACHIEVED, A STUDENT WILL BE READY FOR COLLEGE OR CAREER. THE BENCHMARKS ARE A FLOOR, NOT A CEILING.”

It’s a floor, not a ceiling, so of course a student can learn more than the standards require.  Except, wait a minute.  Common Core is advertised as rigorous, “informed by the highest standards,” and “informed by the top performing countries.”

So which is it?  Are they the minimum required, or are they “new demands” and “high expectations?”  Logic dictates that they cannot be both a floor and a ceiling at the same time.  By the way, the skill of exercising logic is also fully incorporated in the Common Core Standards.

The folks at Fordham want us to believe that the Common Core standards are like Mamma Bear’s porridge: “just right!”  Um, guys.  You are trying to impose a single set of standards on every public school kid in America.  There are a lot of public school kids in America.  They have very diverse life experiences and goals.  How in the world are those standards going to be “just right” for every single one of them?

Bonus:  here is one of the authors of Common Core, explaining how the standards are too low for students who plan to either enter a STEM field of study or apply for a prestigious, competitive university:

The Fordham Fact Sheet carries on at length about students performing poorly in math, but how exactly does the existence of this problem prove Common Core is the solution?  It does not follow.  Here’s some remedial work for Common Core proponents:  a CC-aligned lesson on logical fallacies.

Here’s the third assertion/fact to chew on:

3.  ASSERTION: “THE COMMON CORE DISINCENTIVIZES PARENT INVOLVEMENT. IT STOPS PARENTS FROM A DEEP AND ABIDING INTEREST IN THEIR CHILD’S EDUCATION.”  FACT: WITH STANDARDS, PARENTS CAN CLEARLY ASSESS IF THEIR CHILD IS BEING CHALLENGED TO GAIN THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO SUCCEED IN COLLEGE OR CAREER.

I’ll pick up with this one next week.  Hint:  I think I see some false premises in there . . .

***************************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

The time has come to ditch the weekly goal to focus on the monthly figure, that’s where the real action is at.

In order for this to be a viable full-time business this blog has to take in enough to make the mortgage/tax payment for the house (Currently $1210 monthly) and cover the costs of the writers writing here (another $255)

As of this writing 7 AM EST we need $1278 to meet this goal by April 30th.

That comes out 51 people kicking in $25 over the rest of the month or basically three people a day.

I think the site and the work done here is worth it, if you do too then please consider hitting DaTipJar below .

Naturally once our monthly goal is made these solicitations will disappear till the next month but once we get 61 more subscribers  at $20 a month the goal will be covered for a full year and this pitch will disappear until 2015.

Consider the lineup you get for this price, in addition to my own work seven days a week you get John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

If that’s not worth $20 a month I’d like to know what is?

 

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT – The state of education in the United States today is troublesome.  One report after another comes across the wires:  stressed out teachers are disengaged with their work, teachers are overworked and burned out, and apparently we have ineffective teachers in our low-performing schools.  Go figure.

Is any of this news to anyone?

Sometimes we can read all this data and all these reports and draw false conclusions.  Let’s consider some alternative conclusions to the ones most commonly drawn.

Consider the report that stressed out teachers are disengaged with their work.  This is a conclusion drawn from a new Gallup report, The State of America’s Schools which contends that  7 in 10 teachers are “do not feel engaged” in their work which is having a negative effect on students.  Certainly if a teacher is stressed out and under pressure this will have a negative impact on the teacher over time.  We all want our kids to have teachers who are exciting and make them feel the hunger for learning, so this report is obviously troublesome.

But why are teachers disengaged?  Gallup:

On two points, teachers were the least likely of any profession surveyed on workforce engagement to respond positively: whether they feel their opinions at work count, and whether their supervisor creates an “open and trusting environment.”

“That’s a really big eye-opener,” says Brandon Busteed, executive director of Gallup Education. “So there’s something about the open, trusting environment that isn’t working in schools and that they don’t believe their opinions count. That is definitely weighing down the potential of making them more engaged in their workplace.”

Well, that’s an interesting conclusion but I don’t think it’s fair to put so much blame on the supervisor or administrator.  True, that’s an important role:  you need a supportive administrator who will back your decisions in the classroom, but the administrator is also just a gateway in a sense.  Walk it all the way back.  Principal, supervisor, local superintendent, state level superintendents, and now (thank you Common Core…) the federal government.  So, to put all the blame on the immediate supervisor is misguided.

A simplified example:  A teacher wants to teach a novel that has relevance to her students; it meets and challenges their reading level. (The teacher knows this reading level because she has done a diagnostic test and has determined the reading level of each student).  The teacher knows this novel will engage her students and has a passion for bringing that novel and level of engagement to her students.

But wait!  She can’t teach that novel.  Common Core says all her students must read an obscure work with a Lexile level much higher than her students are functioning on, a novel for which the teacher has no engagement or passion.

How well is that going to work?  The teacher isn’t going to be excited about the lesson, the students are going to be struggling to relate to the work, and the students are going to struggle to even make sense of the words because said novel is so far above their reading level.

Now granted, that’s a simplified example; a really good teacher will figure out a way to bring passion to whatever novel the idgits that made the reading list make her teach.  But it wears you down.  The teacher has been stripped of her professional ability and decision making.  The teacher no longer can decide what’s best for her individual students.

Thus, burnout.  Frustration.

Is this all Common Core’s fault?  Of course not.  Teachers have been fighting bureaucracy and burnout for years.  The suits sit around conference tables and figure out what new save-the-state-of-education fad will be imposed this year and then they do endless professional development sessions to implement the plan.  Veteran teachers have seen them all before; they come in cycles.

With regard to burnout and frustration, consider that one of the requirements of Common Core is that states must also implement a rigorous teacher evaluation system.  Professional evaluation is important and I don’t know of a single profession that doesn’t have an evaluation system, but common sense must prevail.  Some of these evaluation tools are profoundly subjective and unfair.  When a teacher is marked off on an evaluation because a student put a dab of lotion on her knees during the observation, which obviously means classroom expectations haven’t been taught and the teacher has poor classroom management, frustration will result.

When those observations and evaluations are tied to teacher pay and that annual incentive check comes out, the teacher that has Honors and AP kids will get the big incentive check while the teacher with the low-performing, struggling kids who have not been taught social skills at home gets the very small check.  Frustration results.

In reality, teachers aren’t frustrated with their work or with their job.  They are frustrated with the system that prevents them from doing their job and that persecutes them for things beyond their control.  I don’t know one single teacher who went into the profession to get rich.  Every teacher I know does it because of a love for kids and for the opportunity to make a difference in just one kid’s life.  When that passion is squelched by a system that ties their hands, strips their decision making, persecutes them, and makes them feel like failures, then there is something wrong with the system, not the teachers.

Consider these words from a frustrated first-year teacher:

The truth is that there simply aren’t enough hours in the day to do everything that is required of me. There is always something, whether it’s a training requirement or writing tests or preparing my lessons or grading papers or counseling struggling students. Some things get finished. Most things do not.

My working life is an uneasy calculation between the most pressing need and the requirements that I hope can remain unfinished. Sometimes I feel like I am always on the verge of failure, one tiny slip or miscalculation away from either being fired or failing my students.

She resigned shortly after her letter was published.

The sad thing is, her situation is all too common.

We need to support our young teachers, trust our veteran teachers, and restore local autonomy to our school systems and classrooms.  If we fail to do this, public education will be an antiquated idea from a society that has failed its most vulnerable members: the children.

 

Pat Austin also blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

***************************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

The time has come to ditch the weekly goal to focus on the monthly figure, that’s where the real action is at.

In order for this to be a viable full-time business this blog has to take in enough to make the mortgage/tax payment for the house (Currently $1210 monthly) and cover the costs of the writers writing here (another $255)

As of now we need $1278 to meet this goal by April 30th.

That comes out 51 people kicking in $25 over the rest of the month or basically three people a day.

I think the site and the work done here is worth it, if you do too then please consider hitting DaTipJar below .

Naturally once our monthly goal is made these solicitations will disappear till the next month but once we get 61 more subscribers  at $20 a month the goal will be covered for a full year and this pitch will disappear until 2015.

Consider the lineup you get for this price, in addition to my own work seven days a week you get John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

If that’s not worth $20 a month I’d like to know what is?

 

By John Ruberry

The effects of Russia’s annexation of the Crimea are being felt in the Baltic States–Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. The three states were part of Czarist Russia, but they won their independence from the Bolsheviks after World War I. It was not to last–the tiny nations were seized by the Soviet Union in 1940. My wife, who was born in Latvia, was told that the three nations “requested” to join the USSR by her teachers.

Riga, Latvia
Riga, Latvia

Shortly before the collapse of the Evil Empire, the Baltic States regained their independence.

Despite being hit hard by the economic crisis of 2008, the Baltic States are the wealthiest of the former Soviet Republics. The democratic nations are members of NATO and the European Union.

But not all well in what was known in imperial Russia as “our West.” Thousands of Balts were deported to Siberia in the 1940s, Russian speakers took their place. It was an essential part of Josef Stalin’s policy of Russification–one people, one language. Over two decades after the collapse of the USSR, ethnic Russians comprise roughly one-quarter the population of Latvia and Estonia. Lithuania has a tiny Russian population but it borders the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia.

Needless to say, some people are nervous in the Baltics about the Ukraine crisis and Russia. Vaira Vike-Freiberga, the former president of Latvia, told NPR earlier this month, “We have to worry every minute of every day.” Latvia and Lithuania suspended the broadcasts of the international service of a Russian government-owned television network for three months because of what they deemed inflammatory broadcasts.

An ethnic Russian member of the European Parliament from Latvia is under investigation by Latvian authorities for being a Russian Federation agent.

I’ve been to Latvia twice. When walking the streets of its capital, Riga, one is just a likely to hear Russian spoken as Latvian.

The most tense situation is in Estonia. Its third largest city, Narva, sits on the border of the Russian Federation. Just four percent of the residents are Narva are Estonian. The two nations have an unresolved border dispute. Estonia was the victim of a 2007 Russian cyber attack.

Pro independence rally in Latvia, 1990.
Pro independence rally
in Latvia, 1990.

To become a citizen of Estonia or Latvia, Russians and their descendants who emigrated there after 1940 have to pass a difficult language test, which is significant challenge for the elderly. Russians born there after 1991 can choose citizenship. In Lithuania Russians were offered citizenship upon independence.

In response to the Crimea crisis, NATO dispatched some F-16 jets to Lithuania and President Obama sent Vice President Joe Biden there. I’m sure the Balts appreciated the former more than the latter.

But if Vladimir Putin uses the same reasoning–the protection of Russians–to seize Narva as he did with Crimea, will President Obama and NATO have the stomach to view such a move as a violation of Article V of the charter of the alliance, “An attack on one is an attack on all?”

Or will Obama simply draw another of his meaningless red lines, as he did in Syria?

Putin has called the collapse of the USSR a “geopolitical tragedy.” 

But now he has Crimea. Is there a next move?

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

***************************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

The time has come to ditch the weekly goal to focus on the monthly figure, that’s where the real action is at.

In order for this to be a viable full-time business this blog has to take in enough to make the mortgage/tax payment for the house (Currently $1210 monthly) and cover the costs of the writers writing here (another $255)

As of now we need $1278 to meet this goal by April 30th.

That comes out 51 people kicking in $25 over the rest of the month or basically three people a day.

I think the site and the work done here is worth it, if you do too then please consider hitting DaTipJar below .

Naturally once our monthly goal is made these solicitations will disappear till the next month but once we get 61 more subscribers  at $20 a month the goal will be covered for a full year and this pitch will disappear until 2015.

Consider the lineup you get for this price, in addition to my own work seven days a week you get John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

If that’s not worth $20 a month I’d like to know what is?

 

steve eggBy Steve Eggleston

Semi-retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens has a new book coming out later this month titled Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution. Assistant Professor of Law at South Texas College of Law Josh Blackman received a review copy and revealed Stevens’ proposed amendments (H/T – Jazz Shaw). Let’s review them (non-typographical changes to existing sections are in italics, descriptions are in bold):

The “Anti-Commandeering Rule” (amend the Supremacy Clause of Article VI) – This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges and other public officials in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

Why bother having states at all when every diktat from the District of Columbia is the unchallengable end-all/be-all?

Political Gerrymandering (new amendment) – Districts represented by members of Congress, or by members of any state legislative body, shall be compact and composed of contiguous territory. The state shall have the burden of justifying any departures from this requirement by reference to neutral criteria such as natural, political, or historical boundaries or demographic changes. The interest in enhancing or preserving the political power of the party in control of the state government is not such a neutral criterion.

Unless, of course, the concept of “majority-minority” districts survives. Indeed, the whole purpose of a majority-minority district is to ensure the election of a number of Democrats (preferably of the minority) as it is assumed that virtually every minority votes for Democrats and only Democrats.

Further, like Jazz, I don’t trust judges, which will inevitably be the arbiter, to be “fair”. After all, the state Senate district I live in had Oak Creek and Milwaukee’s East Side joined by the Jones Island sewage plant by a three-federal judge panel in 2002, with the unspoken explanation being the white liberal East Siders didn’t want to be part of a “minority-influence” district. The net effect is that, even though the Assembly district has since become reliably Republican (likely unintended as it flipped from 80 years of Democrat dominance in a special election held right in the middle of a voter revolt against the excesses of the Milwaukee County government), the Senate seat is now held by the most-radical elected Democrat in Wisconsin.

Campaign Finance (new amendment) – Neither the First Amendment nor any other provision of this Constitution shall be construed to prohibit the Congress or any state from imposing reasonable limits on the amount of money that candidates for public office, or their supporters, may spend in election campaigns.

Translation – “Shut up, conservatives and Republicans, and let the Rat Presstitute Organs and unionistas do all the campaigning.” My answer to that is an unprintable quote from Elwood Blues in “Blues Brothers”, but the last three words are “…this noise, man”.

Sovereign Immunity (new amendment) – Neither the Tenth Amendment, the Eleventh Amendment, nor any other provision of this Constitution, shall be construed to provide any state, state agency, or state officer with an immunity from liability for violating any act of Congress, or any provision of this Constitution.

Jazz thinks it’s an unnecessary rehash of the “anti-commandering rule”. It is not – rather, it is absolutely necessary if the goal is to cow states into subservience by every means available.

Death Penalty (amend the 8th Amendment) – Excessive Bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments such as the death penalty inflicted.

Sorry, Stevens, but some crimes do justify the application of the death penalty.

The Second Amendment (amend the 2nd Amendment) – A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms when serving in the Militia shall not be infringed.

Where to begin with this one? “Cold, dead fingers” comes to mind. The fact that, up through and past the Civil War, private citizens with the means to procure or produce weaponry had absolutely everything the military had also comes to mind.

Update (DTG) I think Justice Stevens’ book is a gift to conservatives .

faustaby Fausta Rodriguez Wertz

Back when other middle school girls were reading Nancy Drew, I discovered Arthur Conan Doyle‘s Sherlock Holmes books and became a life-long fan.

They used to play Basil Rathbone’s Sherlock Holmes movies on TV when I lived in Puerto Rico, back in the days when TV sets had no remotes, so I watched those, too, even when Holmes (Basil) verbally abused Watson (played by Nigel Bruce) in the likes of:

Nigel: How did you solve that, Holmes?
Basil: It was elementary [snotty/condescending explanation follows]
Nigel: I see! Even a child could have solved it!
Basil (sneers): Not your child, Watson.

I’m a moderate, low-key, FaceBook-type fan; not one that joins Sherlock Holmes fan clubs (I did take a Holmes-themed walking tour of London years ago) or remembers much trivia, but a fan all the same. In addition to having read all the Conan Doyle books, over the years I’ve watched several Sherlock incarnations, including Michael Caine in an awful movie aptly named Without a Clue to Robert Downey Jr.’s martial arts Sherlock. The supreme, definitive, Sherlock is Jeremy Brett, who was able to develop his character over the years and whose Sherlock lived in nicely-appointed Eduardian lodgings.

So last night I thought I’d watch CBS’s Elementary. Its Sherlock lives in modern squalor (inexplicably he has a $10,000 Viking range but his walls need paint), the plot didn’t exactly grab me, and my room needed tidying up so I watched while doing light housework. The suspect responsible for some deadly Anthrax poisonings turned out to be some dude with “extreme radical leanings. . . They hate the government, including the NYPD, but they’re big fans of violence and the Second Amendment.”

Now, in my ripe old age I know propaganda when I see it: A love of violence is equal to a love for one article of the Bill of Rights, because guns. It was 15 minutes or so into the show, and in my ripe old age I don’t waste time turning off the TV, either.

Bye-bye, Elementary.

Over the pond, where they have very restrictive gun laws, Sherlock (whose apartment is a museum of ugly wallpaper) is packing heat, big time.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics and culture at Fausta’s blog.

 

**********************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

It’s Friday and we’ve still 11 $25 tip jar hits from this weeks goal.

We don’t have the offices of an Ezra Klein or investors willing to pay millions to give the White House line.

All we have his good writers daily, original reporting and a mortgage that needs paying.

If you think the writing and reporting and the time and effort it takes to produce it is worthwhile please hit DaTipJar below so it can continue.

  Of course if you want to give a gift that will pay all year long consider subscribing.  If 61 of you hit Subscribe at $20 a month subscribers this site will be able to cover its bills for a full year. For that you not only get my work seven days a week but consider the lineup you get for that price, including John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

 

By A.P. Dillon

Joe Biden wants you to “Stand Up” for voting rights. Here’s the video:

Oh… my bad. Wrong video. Here we go:

So wait, what? Biden wants you to help “Expand the Vote“?

Voting is a fundamental right in our democracy, and making it easier — not harder — for everyone to exercise that right is one of our top priorities as Democrats.

That’s why we launched the Voter Expansion Project. Add your name to join Joe Biden and Democrats protecting and expanding the right to vote:”

Translated: You’re a racist if you believe in Voter ID.

The reason for this new project headed up by Joe is clearly a sign the Democrats are not just hitting the 2014 election panic button, they’re now jumping up and down on it with both feet. They also see what grassroots activist groups like Voter Integrity Project (VIP) are doing to restore integrity to election in North Carolina.

APRIL 2, 2014–Raleigh–Up to 765 voters have voted in both NC and at least one other state according to a report titled, “Presentation to Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee,” briefed to the committee today at the Legislative Office Building.

“This confirms our deepest concerns,” said Jay DeLancy, Executive Director of the Voter Integrity Project of NC. “We always knew that if the State Board of Elections cared to investigate such matters, they would find ample evidence of voter fraud.”

A total of 765 voters included the following supporting evidence: Exact match of first and last name, date of birth and last four of their Social Security Number.

“The big bombshell today is that you have documented voter fraud,” said Representative Tim Moore (R) Cleveland County. “This is proof positive that voter fraud has occurred. It is just as much voter suppression if votes are being cast fraudulently and illegally as it is when votes are not being cast. I’m afraid what you’ve found, Mrs. Strach, is the tip of the iceberg.”

Another 35,750* [corrected from earlier error of 37,750] voters “with first and last name and DOB match that are registered in NC and another state and voted in both 2012 general election[s],” the report said.

The information was obtained by the State Board of Elections in response to Legislative prodding (HB 589) that required the BOE to start cooperating with other states who are part of the so-called “Kansas Consortium,” created by Kansas Secretary of State Chris Kobach.

“Twenty-eight states are involved in this process,” according to Kim Strach, SBOE Executive Director, “but Florida dropped out of the process at the last minute.”

Florida dropped out of the process, yet VIP has found direct evidence of double voting there in this update:

(Raleigh, NC)— APR 8, 2014—The Voter Integrity Project of North Carolina, today released the results of their year-long research effort that found 5,167 people who appeared to be registered to vote in both Florida and NC, and 147 people who “were involved” in voter fraud. They gave the information to election officials in both Florida and North Carolina, in addition to a member of the NC Senate committee responsible of election law. All of the voters had a matching first name, last name and date of birth.

Read More on the VIP Investigation here.

All of this has come out as the leader of Moral Monday, NC NAACP’s Reverend Barber, continues to harass and attempt to intimidate VIP and has entered into a lawsuit using a 92 year-old woman as their prop plaintiff over the North Carolina Voter ID law (VIVA). Of course, the DOJ and the ACLU boarded the lawsuit train. Meanwhile, Voter ID is very popular in North Carolina.

Moral Monday calls VIVA the “Voter Suppression bill” that will take us back to Jim Crow! Because… RACISM!  Let’s also not forget the “Voter ID” Misinformation hotline the NC NAACP set up as well.

Related Flashback:

#MoralMarch will protest NC’s new “racist” #VoterID, but you’re req’d to bring photo ID to the march. #ncpol pic.twitter.com/w14mzejdSn

— Stacey-SisterToldjah (@sistertoldjah) February 8, 2014

 

So what are Democrats in North Carolina doing to manipulate elections now that they have to show ID starting in 2016? Encouraging people to flip their voter registration so they can vote in Republican primaries. There seem to be a lot of ‘new’ Republicans in some of these races. In fact, some of these new Republicans really sound like …Moral Monday Democrats. Gee, Operation Chaos? I hope these Democrats realize that by doing so, they can’t vote in any Democrat run-off that may occur in their areas.

By the way:

 

If you enjoyed this article, you should really check out other pieces written by Da Tech Guy’s Magnificent Seven writers and maybe hit that tip jar!
AP DillonA.P. Dillon (Lady Liberty 1885), is a Conservative minded wife and mother living in the Triangle area of North Carolina. A.P. Dillon founded the blog LadyLiberty1885.com in 2009. After the 2012 election, she added an Instapundit style blog called The ConMom Blog. Mrs. Dillon’s writing, in addition to Da Tech Guy’s Magnificent 7, can also be found at StopCommonCoreNC.org, WatchdogWireNC and WizBang. Non-political writing projects include science fiction novellas that are, as of yet, unpublished. Her current writing project is a children’s book series.
 

************************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

It’s Thursday we are $276 dollars short  11 tip jar hits from a full paycheck with three days to go.

If you think the writing and reporting and the time and effort it takes to produce it is worthwhile please hit DaTipJar below so it can continue.

  Of course if you want to give a gift that will pay all year long consider subscribing.  If 61 of you hit Subscribe at $20 a month subscribers this site will be able to cover its bills for a full year. For that you not only get my work seven days a week but consider the lineup you get for that price, including John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

 

by Fausta Rodriguez Wertz

In June, 2001, Cuban spies Gerardo Hernández, Antonio Guerrero, Ramón Labañino, Fernando González, and René González (known as the Cuban Five or the Miami Five) were convicted of 26 federal charges, including conspiracy to commit espionage, conspiracy to commit murder, and acting as agents of a foreign government. The Communist regime acknowledges that the men are intelligence agents, but were spying on the Cuban exile community and not the U.S. government. Over the years, they have filed appeals and have become fixtures of the Cuban propaganda machine. René González was released on October 7, 2011, and Fernando González was released on February 27, 2014.

Hernández, Guerrero and Labañino are still serving their life sentences, and the Cuban government continues to push for their release. Some 130 celebrities have asked for their release.

In December 2009, Alan P. Gross was arrested while in Cuba working as a U.S. government subcontractor for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) for bringing satellite phones and computer equipment to members of Cuba’s small Jewish community. He was held in jail, and, in March, 2011 was convicted for “acts against the independence or the territorial integrity of the state”.

What does “acts against the independence or the territorial integrity of the state” means? It means that, in Cuba, attempting to provide access to the internet is a crime.

Here’s a list of questions explaining his descent into hell.

Jimmy Carter met with Gross in 2011, Jesse Jackson was denied access in 2013.

Last year Mary O’Grady of the Wall Street Journal spelled out Gross’ situation: Cuba Admits Gross Is a Pawn

In other words, Mr. Gross is a negotiating chip. Ms. Vidal would not say what Cuba wants in exchange for letting him go, but the release of several Cuban intelligence officers convicted in 2001 of spying on the U.S. is likely on the list.

The U.S. government has clearly stated that it will not swap the 3 spies for Gross. The USAID office apparently has made no effort towards Gross’ release.

Gross, 63, has lost over 100lbs and has a large lump growing on his back, which under the “excellent free healthcare” Cubans endure are considered “chronic illnesses that are typical of his age.”

His situation is desperate: yesterday USA Today reported that Gross has started a hunger strike.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics and culture at Fausta’s blog.

We all know dealing with the government can be challenging.  Anyone who has lived through an IRS audit (4 years in a row) can attest to that.  Maybe there was a bit of personal agitation in that statement, but I digress.

I was once enlisted in the Army.  I am proud of my service and proud of my Country.  I am very proud to call myself an American.

I am not proud of our Veterans Administration.

For slightly more than a decade now we have asked our Soldiers and Sailors to go off and fight the Global War on Terror.  They did.

Many of them came back with injuries that will last a lifetime.  The obvious injuries, lost limbs, etc. are easily seen.  We all want to honor their service and help them come back to a quality of life they deserve.  A quality of life all Americans deserve.

What they come back to is having to deal with the VA to help them cope with these injuries, that not all of which can be seen.

Some of these injuries are mental and emotional.  Can you imagine the trauma burnt into someone’s brain of having lost an arm?  That is traumatic enough.

Let’s add to that loss the fact that it happened when an IED went off.

Let’s add to that trauma the fact that the IED was unseen until it went off.

Let’s add the THAT trauma that the IED that was unseen was hidden on a suburban street corner in some cases.

How hard would it be for you to feel safe driving up to another street corner anytime soon?

I would have issues.

We have all seen the news stories about the LONG waits to even have your case reviewed by the VA much less benefits determined.  Those are all over the blogosphere.

What isn’t discussed as much is what the Veterans tell each other about how to deal with the VA so that your claims (especially the PTSD and similar) are taken seriously.

I was talking to a Veteran friend of mine who is recently discharged (I was discharged in 1996 and am not disabled).  He, I, and several of his friends were trading emails and something absolutely appalling came across my screen.

How to get the VA to take your claim seriously was the topic.  One veteran was giving another veteran advice on what makes the VA move on a case.

Here is the advice:

When you go to your appointment do the following:

  • Make sure you do not shave for a few days
  • Don’t bathe that day and perhaps the day before
  • Wear old worn out clothing
  • Make sure your shoes are dirty
  • If you can tolerate it, make sure you smell like body waste…In other words make sure you smell like you peed (or something else) on yourself

This is how Veterans tell each other to deal with our government.

Is this how things should be?  Or should Veterans be able to tell each other, oh yeah just fill out the form, see the doctor, and they will do everything they can to help you.

This should not be the experience our Veterans have.  Period.

I urge everyone who can to write your Representatives in Washington. DO NOT just say the wait times are bad, although they are.  The tragedy here is not the wait time.  The tragedy here is the treatment, the customer service if you will, that we give the people who gave us their best.

If you do not know who your Representative is, or need help with the process of contacting them, please drop a comment here, find me (Timothy Imholt) on Facebook, or email me at tim@timothyimholt.com.  I will do everything I can for these guys who did everything they could for us.

Amazon.com Widgets

********************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

It’s Tuesday and based on yesterday & Sunday our consecutive streak of failing to make our $365 weekly goal is in no danger.

I do promise you if you do hit DaTipJar and help us get to our $365 weekly goal I’ll keep fighting like Mrs. Palin.  I’m not as valuable to the conservative movement as her but I’ll continue to do my part.

 

 

If 61 of you hit Subscribe at $20 a month subscribers this site will be able to cover its bills for a full year.

For that you not only get my work seven days a week but consider the lineup you get for that price, including John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillion (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.


 

Lindaby Linda Szugyi

Today, I watched Building The Machine, the Homeschool Legal Defense Association’s documentary about Common Core.  Then I spent most of the rest of today researching the latest on Common Core.

Frankly, I’ve spent more hours than I care to count researching Common Core.  Then researching a little more.  Then writing about it.  Then writing about it again.  And then, for variety, writing about it some more.

I ran into a name that’s new to me:  Professor Willingham, Ph.D.  While not a Common Core fan, he warns against vitriol in the debate:

“Of all the bloggers, pundits, reporters, researchers, etc. I know, I can think of two who I would say are mean-spirited–both of them unrelentingly vitriolic, I’m guessing in some wretched effort to resolve personal disappointments.

Of the remaining hundreds, all give every evidence of sincerity and of genuine passion for education.

So this is a call for fewer blog postings that, implicitly or explicitly,  denigrate the other person’s motives, or that offer a knowing nod with the claim “we all know what those people think.”

I have a different take on that, though.  There are times to take your opponents seriously, and there are times when their claims warrant mockery.  It is ridiculous to claim that college and career readiness are one and the same.  Your claims have no weight when they involve foil-hat insults.  It is foolish to force an untested scheme on school children nationwide, and simply hope for the best.  It is ridiculous to largely refuse to take part in a documentary, and then attempt to claim that said documentary is spurious.

I highly recommend reading Professor Willingham’s article about one of the key concepts of Common Core:  critical thinking.  In it, he explains why ‘critical thinking’ is not simply another teachable skill, and why the act of critical thinking is dependent on subject matter knowledge.  In another worthwhile read, he explains that reading strategies (once the bane of my son’s existence) can do more harm than good.

A couple of years ago a public school teacher told me that all children need to use reading strategies, or else they won’t understand what they are reading.  This teacher was older than me, and “reading strategies” weren’t a thing when we were in school.  Yet, somehow we learned how to understand what we read.  A fact like this should speak for itself.

But a lack of common sense today is preventing folks from seeing the obvious.  So they give weight and credence to ideas that don’t withstand scrutiny.  With the application of a little common sense (and dare I say, critical thinking) the experts would realize an issue as complex as education cannot be ironed out by a single set of standards:

“Obviously schooling is complex, with a number of interacting factors that contribute to student outcomes. . . . [A] problem in one part of the system might mask positive change in another part of the system, just as repairs to the electrical system of a car might appear to have no effect if the fuel system also needs repair.

There seems to be no recognition of this possibility in education policy, which is evaluated on a system-wide basis.  No Child Left Behind was a complex law with ramifications at every level of the educational system.  Yet the autopsy is seldom more nuanced than ‘it didn’t work.'”

Dr. Willingham’s words remind me of Hayek’s warnings against centralized planners acting on the pretense of knowledge.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation has created a pro-Common Core video in response to the HSLDA video.  Somehow, four minutes of cheerleading is supposed to refute everything in HSLDA’s documentary.  Don’t take my word for it.  Watch both videos and decide for yourself, as a test of your critical thinking skills.  Maybe later, I’ll gin up a standardized test to fully evaluate your college and career readiness.

Time for the bio!  I’m Linda.  We used to pay for private school, until horrible things like “clothes hanger book reports” and “reading strategies” drove both me and Older Son crazy.  That didn’t seem like a good bargain.  So for now I’m homeschooling.  We’ll see what education choices our next PCS brings . . . say that reminds me.  Do you know what is a good bargain?  A Tech Guy subscription!  The button is right below these words.

*******************************************************************

*******************************************************

Olimometer 2.52

It’s Monday and based on yesterday’s take of $2 our consecutive streak of failing to make our $365 weekly goal is in no danger.

I do promise you if you do hit DaTipJar and help us get to our $365 weekly goal I’ll keep fighting like Mrs. Palin.  I’m not as valuable to the conservative movement as her but I’ll continue to do my part.

 

 

If 61 of you hit Subscribe at $20 a month subscribers this site will be able to cover its bills for a full year.

For that you not only get my work seven days a week but consider the lineup you get for that price, including John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillion (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.