One of the most revealing examples of the cultural divide occurred when Emmy voters determined that The Handmaid’s Tale was the best drama on television. Furthermore, Elisabeth Moss won an Emmy for her role as best actress. All told, this dreadful television program won eight awards.

Based on a novel by Margaret Atwood, this series is set in Gilead, a totalitarian society in what used to be part of the United States. Gilead is ruled by a “Christian” regime that treats women as property of the state and is faced with environmental disasters and a plummeting birth rate. To repopulate a devastated world, the few remaining fertile women are forced into sexual servitude.

The regime hangs gays, abortion clinic workers, and… wait for it…Catholics.

I admit I tried 15 minutes of Episode One a few months ago without really knowing what the program was about. Simply put, I quickly found the show offensive, including the use of Gilead, an actual region from the Bible in what is now Jordan.

The author is a feminist from Canada who writes what she calls “speculative fiction.” In The Guardian, she says, “Speculative fiction could really happen.”

That’s right. She thinks that a totalitarian government based in the United States could create a state with women as sexual slaves.

Furthermore, Atwood is virulently anti-American, seeing Canada as the only hope for North America.

According to various sources, the author is part of the animals-are-people-too brigade. In Surfacing, one character remarks about eating animals: “The animals die that we may live; they are substitute people…And we eat them, out of cans or otherwise; we are eaters of death, dead Christ-flesh resurrecting inside us, granting us life.”

This wingnut is a leftist in every sense of the word.

Atwood has received numerous awards for her books—an indication that something is clearly wrong with the sensibilities of the cultural elite.

In a related development, Axios.com, a leading political website, reported about a study of 3,500 viewers nationwide that “showed that viewers who voted for … Hillary Clinton are more interested in dark comedies and programs featuring unconventional families, antiheroes, and strong female leads … Clinton voters also like political satire.”

Trump voters “are more likely to favor shows that depict traditional family values. They prefer male leads and heroes who are not conflicted and ‘tend to do the right thing’ … They are likely to tune out entertainment shows with depictions of gay people in sexual situations, negative portrayals of religion, and political humor.”

It seems clear that the Emmy voters fall on the Clinton side of this equation. It’s scandalous that this piece of tripe, The Handmaid’s Tale, became the darling of the cultural elite. Fortunately, the series runs on Hulu, so not that many people saw it.

Well, I guess it’s time for me to get back to Shooter, The Last Ship, and a few other favorites of my fellow Trump supporters.

Footnote: I hope that Hulu does a better job with The Looming Tower, which is the best book on 9/11 and scheduled for broadcast in the next year.

Watching awards shows on television is as big a treat as having a colonoscopy without anesthesia. Well, actually, it’s worse. I’ve never had a colonoscopy that lasted three hours.

It doesn’t matter if the host is affable and funny — Billy Crystal and Johnny Carson come to mind — or amazingly irritating like David Letterman. The shows are overstuffed extravaganzas that drain your body and rot your brain.

With an attitude like that, I couldn’t wait to skip Sunday’s Emmy Awards broadcast. I couldn’t stand watching three minutes of Stephen Colbert’s past and present TV shows. Why in God’s name would I want to spend three hours with him and the croaking chorus  of Trump haters sharing the stage?

Apparently you and many others felt the same, sending the Emmy ratings to new depths. It’s good to know so many good folks have the good sense to avoid political poison masquerading as entertainment (and so few conservatives are masochists).

Meanwhile, the entertainment establishment, pink to its left-wing core, is studying birds’ flight patterns and reading beasts’ entrails to discern why viewers of its awards programs are vanishing. You don’t have to be a seer to figure out that your numbers will be weak if you don’t mind driving away half your audience. But the movers, shakers and moguls of Hollywood don’t know anybody who doesn’t think about politics as they do, so they’re simply stumped.

Just as fan disgust with Colin Kaepernick isn’t the only reason why ratings have plummeted for NFL broadcasts, partisanship isn’t the only cause for the decline in interest for the Emmys and Oscars.

Thirty years ago, cable TV was a relatively small operation, so most Americans were still stuck with the three major networks: ABC, CBS and NBC. Even poorly rated shows had a dozen million viewers. The series finale for CBS’ MASH was seen by nearly 106 million people in 1983; that audience record stood until 106.5 million viewers watched New Orleans beat Indianapolis in the 2010 Superbowl.

Cable has grown like a monster since 1983 and created a bigger stir in recent years by offering original programming. Many new shows are low-budget reality programs, but some basic cable channels — FX, USA, AMC and SyFy — offer top-notch stuff that was once the purview of HBO and Showtime.

Of course, Netflix was a huge game changer when it threw big money into new programming and brought instant relevance to streaming video.

And therein lies a big problem for the Emmys — they’re elitist. Only a handful of this year’s nominees represented broadcast TV, and even fewer of them took home awards. The big winner, as usual lately, was HBO.

Just as people in showbiz don’t know anyone who supported Donald Trump, they don’t know anybody who doesn’t have cable TV. More importantly, they don’t know anybody who doesn’t have HBO or Netflix, where they presume the best stuff appears. As of the end of 2016, HBO only had about 49 million subscribers, and Lord knows how many of those are hotels, motels and other businesses.

As a result, a good portion of the American public has no skin in the Emmy game since the awards revolve around programs they don’t even have the ability to watch. I guess the entertainment bigwigs have written them off as deplorables.

Then, too, there’s more than one aspect of elitism in terms of the type of shows the nominators enjoy. I watch more than my share of TV, and I’m the kind of guy who won’t abide stupidity on my flat screen. Yet only a couple of my favorites — Better Call Saul, The Americans, Stranger Things — even had an Emmy nomination. Instead, the voters exhumed the long-dead corpse of Saturday Night Live and showered it with glory.

The same thing goes for the Oscars. But that’s another story.

As I write this mini-article, millions of Americans are hearing about how bad Donald Trump is, how unfair the government is going to be to illegal immigrants, how Ted Cruz loves porn, and who won an award or two scattered in with the slew of liberal jokes. I’m not.

Instead, I’ve put together a list of better ways to spend my time than to show support (and yes, by merely watching it you’re showing your support) for an industry that generally despises the small-government, freedom-loving conservatives that accounts for most readers of this blog.

  1. Watch Ben Shapiro’s Berkeley speech. I don’t care if you’ve already seen it. Watch it again.
  2. Read the Constitution. Hey, it’s Constitution Day!
  3. Check out my latest conservative news project, NOQ Report.
  4. Read this article by Lloyd Marcus that highlights the importance of sustaining the American Dream regardless of race.
  5. Listen to the Book of John (because there’s never a bad time for John).
  6. Watch John Stossel asking people about the Constitution. Hey, it’s Constitution Day!
  7. Listen to my interview with The Foo.
  8. Learn what you can about California’s decision to become a sanctuary state. It may happen in your state some day.
  9. Check out this underreported story about a t-shirt maker who may be forced out of business for defending his rights.
  10. Contribute to DaTechGuy. He needs our support.

I don’t care who wins the awards. The narcissistic town of Hollywood (where I had to live for nearly two months while my son had two open-heart surgeries) doesn’t deserve my attention. They do more to harm conservatism than just about any other town in the nation outside of Washington DC.