The House just sent the American Health Care Act to the Senate. From there, it’ll face a tougher fight through Senate revisions before reaching the President’s desk. For the the first time in seven years, the prospects of repealing Obamacare are actually pretty high. Republicans around the nation are cheering. Democrats are spinning it as a call to retake Congress in 2018.

Most of my friends are Republicans, as are most of the readers on this site. I support their desire to rid the nation of the abomination of Obamacare. I also respect the need to put the GOP stamp of approval on a replacement plan. Heck, there are a couple of things in the AHCA that I don’t mind; it’s a slight improvement over the ACA.

One thing I wholeheartedly disagree with is the notion that the AHCA is a step towards smaller government. This does nothing to rein in DC. It keeps the national government firmly entrenched in an area where it absolutely, positively does not belong. By doing so, it prevents the free market from helping millions of Americans by driving down health insurance costs. It adjusts the mandate by shifting the penalty, but the mandate remains nonetheless. It gives states the option to opt out of pre-existing conditions, yet no state will actually use this option. Why? Because by giving the AHCA the GOP stamp of approval, any hope of educating people on the vast negatives associated with the pre-existing conditions clause have evaporated.

It isn’t just the AHCA. Look at the spending package that keeps the government funding President Obama’s sustained laundry list of programs. Look at pushes for huge infrastructure spending. Look at every big government program that is not facing extinction despite the GOP having full control in DC.

As a Federalist, I look at today’s GOP the same way many politically savvy conservatives view it: better than the Democrats. After the rise and fall of the Tea Party as well as a short-term spike in conservatives winning primaries over moderates, we’ve seen the status quo of the Establishment reaffirmed in 2017. The AHCA is just the latest example.

These are unpopular notions to be posting on sites that are supportive of the Republican Party, but I’m not alone in my dissent. Conservative pundits and Federalism-minded journalists around the nation are speaking out.

Ben Shapiro at Daily Wire notes:

On Thursday, House Republicans prepared to take final ownership over Obamacare, slapping a giant “T” atop the edifice of legislative manure and declaring victory. This follows Republicans embracing Barack Obama’s budget priorities in their newest budget bill, which did not fund Trump’s wall but did fund refugee resettlement, Planned Parenthood, and Obamacare. Republicans have apparently become the David Copperfield of garbage: they can take Obama’s garbage and turn it into Trump’s garbage right before your eyes!

Mark Levin has been very critical of the GOP on his show lately:

“Too many conservatives have simply accepted as effective power the minor concession of the progressives” as they “drive the political and cultural agenda,” Levin explains.

Andrea Ruth at RedState supports the bill, but only because not passing it would make the GOP look worse than it already does:

Voters first gave them the House immediately following the passage of Obamacare. Republicans subsequently show-voted on repealing Obamacare more than 50 times in the following six years when they knew such a bill would never be enacted while a Democrat was in the White House.

Noah Millman at The American Conservative isn’t supportive at all:

By their own repeated admission, the GOP leadership has no actual policy goal of any kind. They promised something. They have to deliver something — even if that something is wildly unpopular, satisfies nobody, and bears almost no relation to what they originally promised.

I believe in my heart that many Republican voters still believe in the type of small-government Federalism that Ronald Reagan espoused. It’s not their fault that a majority of Republican representatives view “smaller government” as a catchphrase in their campaign sales pitch instead of a goal. However, don’t try to convince me that they’ll come around eventually. Accept that they’re the big-government Democratlite Party so we can work together to really rein in DC.

There are plenty of plans to repeal, replace, tweak, fix, improve, dismantle, and otherwise make changes to the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. I’m going to keep this short for the sake of simplicity because the answer isn’t hard. Repeal it. What you do after that will work out just fine.

Some will say, “But we need to have a plan in place or the GOP will get slaughtered in 2018 and 2020!” I don’t completely disagree, but there’s an important caveat to note.

There is no plan that doesn’t include installing some variation of socialized medicine that will prevent everyone from losing their coverage. The math simply doesn’t add up. You can’t take something as fiscally obtuse as Obamacare and replace it with something that yields the same results without being essentially the same thing. Yes, people will lose coverage. Yes, the media will play it up. Yes, the Democrats will point to it as a reason to regain power.

The only way to prevent the Great 2018 Slaughter of the Republican Party is to fulfill the promise that they made to repeal it, to invoke the mandate that the last election gave them, and to work like crazy to fight the negative optics associated with it. The sooner they do step one, the better. There are some who are secretly pushing to repeal Obamacare but to not have it take effect until after the election. This is unacceptable. Rip it off like a putrid old band aid and then govern the country amazingly going forward. That’s the only hope.

Here’s the thing. This isn’t new. The GOP has claimed to want to repeal Obamacare for six years. There has been more than enough time to plan it out, prepare for the consequences, and enact a plan to mitigate political damage done. Why are they now acting like this is a brand new development? Why aren’t they embracing perfectly good plans such as the Paul-Sanford bill? Why aren’t they following the lead of people like Ted Cruz who want to fulfill the promise they made?

There. I said it would be short.

What they do after this economic abomination is repealed will work out as long as it doesn’t include a similar monstrosity. The window of opportunity has been open. If they don’t take decisive action now that they have the chance, then they deserve the routing that they fear will happen by doing what they said they were going to do in the first place.

Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.

Matthew 10:32-33

You know there are very few things more depressing when on a pilgrimage to the grave of a nun who built an organization proclaiming the truth of catholic faith to the world to read about this:

Sr Jane Marie Klein, told AP the name changes are in keeping with the mission of the Sisters of St Francis of Perpetual Adoration, which founded the hospital system.

What name change is Sr. Jane Marie Klein saying is in keeping with the mission of the Sisters of St. Francis of Perpetual adoration? Why removing the “saint” out of hospital names that she runs.

The health care system that oversees the Illinois and Indiana hospitals has determined that dropping the saint names will strengthen the brand identity of the system as a whole, according to the Indianapolis Business Journal.

“Unsainted” hospitals include those that had incorporated the names of St James, St Anthony, St Elizabeth, St Margaret, and St Francis.

Because nothing better illustrates the mission of Catholic nuns like ditch the saints and the Catholic identity they allude to.

It seems she followed the exact path that Screwtape suggested.

quietly and gradually nurse him on to the stage at which the religion becomes merely part of the “cause”… Once you have made the World an end, and faith a means, you have almost won your man, and it makes very little difference what kind of worldly end he is pursuing.

This entire story might seem confusing. While the Hospitals will discover that like God, the saints will not force themselves on those who don’t want them and will, however reluctantly agree to stay away, you would think that given the purpose of a hospital is to treat the sick, the aid of the Hospital’s patron would be very valuable. Of course that presumes actual belief and unfortunately I’ve discovered belief is not longer a given among the professed religious.

Exit question, who wants to bet that the Hospitals don’t remove the “St.” when trying to fundraise from faithful Catholics?


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by baldilocks

Being blessed with great health and energy for almost all of my life, I found it disconcerting when I began to get tired at strange times in the day—like 1PM. The cure? Vitamin C and lots of it. An orange, a half of a grapefruit, the juice of a small lemon and a kiwi a day seem to have fixed the problem.

blood-oranges
Blood Oranges. Disconcerting at first, but really good for you.

It seems so simple, doesn’t it? We all grow up being told to eat citrus fruit and to drink a lot of fruit juices. Well, I don’t drink juices—or soda—because they have too much sugar in them. I don’t even buy bread that has more than one gram of sugar in it. (The only area in which I break this rule: coffee.) Keeping sugar out of my diet has kept me from getting too humongous–a battle which members of my family fight, especially the women. So, I had been inconsistent in eating the good sugars. No more and those grapefruit(s) are tasty!

Another natural remedy I’ve used for a couple of years: apple cider vinegar. Members of both sides of my family also suffer from high blood pressure, beginning in the late 40s and I was no different. My pressure had been very low before that, but I noticed the up-creep; I was always right on the borderline of hypertension. I did not want to take prescription medication, so I searched online for natural remedies and consistently found a daily recommendation of 2 tablespoons of ACV with 8 ounces of water. Now, every time I go to the doctor and my vitals are check, my systolic is in the 120 range and my diastolic is in the 60-70 range. (I drink it with a straw so that it doesn’t damage the enamel of my teeth.)

I don’t recommend doing any of these things without doing your own home work first and checking with your doctor. I mention them merely because it seems to me that God has provided many of the cures for nagging issues and signs of aging (I’m 54). We only have to be looking for them. And in the age of Obamacare, it’s always a good idea to be looking for ways to avoid the healthcare system.

I also wonder whether much of the craziness we see around us stems from vitamin, mineral and other dietary deficiencies. Well, excuse me now; I think I need a burger. Beef.

Kenya Trip Wishlist at Amazon.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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baldilocks

By Timothy & Jean Imholt

 

We are autism parents. Autism itself was the subject of television commercials until our son, Emmit, was diagnosed at two years old. The mere mention of the word brought on fear, doubt, distress, anger, guilt, and denial all at the same time! In retrospect this was understandable given that we didn’t have an inkling what that meant at the time. Fast forward to today, when Emmit is four and a half, we are much more educated on the subject and live every single day of our lives with the little dude who forced us to learn about it, and we no longer consider it a two headed, fire breathing monster.

The diagnosis came about because of our crackerjack pediatrician. At his eighteen month checkup he asked us a series of questions about Emmit’s day to day life. The little dude had very few words, he had very poor eye contact and didn’t appear to really enjoy social interaction with his peers; in fact, interaction with other kids seemed to stress him out.

Our son’s pediatrician referred us to a neurological consultant, and ultimately a neuropsychologist at Children’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts diagnosed him with the autism spectrum disorder. Because of his age at the time of diagnosis it was almost impossible to tell exactly where on the spectrum he fell. If you are not familiar with the spectrum, never fear, you are not alone. It is a wide range of diagnosis (we don’t care for disorders as a descriptor). The range goes from mild to severe. It was obvious he wasn’t severe, but realizing that he was on the spectrum at all was a giant leap forward for us in our path to understanding how to help him.

The diagnosis was just the beginning. If you are ever faced with this situation you will learn that a whole lot of stuff comes immediately following learning that little tidbit of information. Then the bombardment really begins. There are a ton of therapies that he needed to be in starting right away. These included speech therapy, applied behavioral analysis (ABA) therapy, and maybe even occupational therapy (OT) for his sensory processing integration challenges.

Now, Tim works full time and luckily we are in a position where Jean can be a full time mom. Her head was definitely spinning, his head was all fuzzy from the entire thing. She spent a week grieving, then by the weekend, rolled up her sleeves and got to work. There was a collective vow that we would get Emmit all of the resources we could to get him ready for the challenges that life throws at all of us. Around this time we also found out that Tim was diagnosed with virtually the same spectrum disorder as a toddler but was never told for a variety of reasons, just to add fuel to our fire. It was the double whammy of a lifetime. That is an entirely different subject and a topic for another day.

Back to Emmit. Shortly after his diagnosis he started receiving many services through a fantastic State funded early intervention program. This program provides speech therapy using floor time, music therapy (which helps far more than you would think at first blush), OT, and once a week he had a social play date, something that is vital for kids (and adults actually, but the nomenclature should change) on the spectrum. Jean immediately sought out other play groups in the neighborhood and through the local church. We also put him in a daycare a couple of days a week. If it sounds like a busy schedule and yes it was. However it is crucial to expose kids like Emmit to as many socially interactive groups as possible and it has to be done very early on.

As Emmit turned 3 all of the State funded therapies came to an end. That is because among other reasons, he was then eligible to go to a peer model, integrated preschool. Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on your perspective, you have to go through a long, drawn out process of getting what is referred to as an individualized education plan or IEP. This is basically a contract, or arrangement for getting Emmit into a preschool program, and what kind of special coursework/treatment he will get while he is there.

As he began attending school we started to see Emmit vocalizing more, requesting his needs with words, and playing with his siblings more and more. On top of all of that success, he learned other new skills, such as dressing himself, and potty training just to name a few. He loved and thrived under the routine of attending school, and his favorite part, riding the school bus.

Earlier this year Emmit turned four. By this point he was able to request what he wanted on his birthday cake! He went with Minions from Despicable Me (a great movie for kids and adults). We got him the cake he wanted and a fantastic party with his classmates in a gymnastics studio near where we live.

Over time, like most kids, he has been invited to a large number of birthday parties. For a child with autism, these can be nightmares. Emmit has thrived so much that he now loves these types of things. There was one just this past weekend where Tim and Jean were both floored when Emmit took the time to say hello to his friends by their name. On one occasion he even struck up a conversation.

“Jimmy, do you like to swim?” asked Emmit.

Whoa wait a minute! Was that Emmit? Yes, yes, it was. Emmit got his answer, which made him smile.

“Yes.” said Jimmy.

Four year old Emmit wasn’t done.

“I went to the swim class today.  I had four floaties,” said Emmit.

Just as a side note, just before the party Emmit had a swim class and had worn a belt with four layers of flotation foam. Jean was almost in tears when she heard this, because he had made so much progress in such a short period of time.

Earlier in the year, we added ABA therapy back into the mix (the state funded version had ended by this point). This was in addition to the speech therapy that he receives at school as per his IEP. We did this privately because he was found ineligible to receive ABA through school because he is not “severe enough” despite the recommendations of his doctors. ABA is known to be amazingly effective for children on the spectrum. It is specifically targeted to modify undesired behaviors through positive motivation and rewards.

Here was the kicker.  With all of the new insurance laws in place (the Affordable Care Act), we learned that this invaluable service for Emmit would not be covered by our insurance in any way. Two doors were shut in our face. First through the school, the second through insurance. Just slam, right on the nose. This was really surprising, especially the insurance coverage part, considering how much we have heard about improvements in this area thanks to new laws. We also found out that prior to the ACA many insurance policies (including ours) covered this type of therapy.

We were well aware that time was of the essence. If we were going to give Emmit this type of therapy, the earlier we start, the better the outcome. We decided right then and there to self-fund his treatment 100% out of pocket. It is shockingly expensive, but the hope was that Emmit would make great progress quickly, so this wouldn’t be a years-long effort. We are seeing the fruits of his hard work with the ABA therapists every single day. He has learned to share, take turns, a ton of functional language (my tummy hurts, etc), he follows multi-step instructions, he is tolerating undesired activities (to a four year old this is a lot of stuff), he is becoming more flexible, but most importantly, he is now confident in himself (enough to approach someone outside of family and ask questions.)

The term autism is no longer scary to us. To be honest, the term autism parent is not something we really used before today. Part of us has been frightened all along, like by saying it out loud, it would become etched in granite. Now with our newly instilled hope, we are proud to have put all of this in writing. In fact, autism parents should be proud of themselves and should be celebrated. We recently read (more like devoured) a book entitled “Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew” which is very much a paradigm shifting book. One of the many things from that book we found of high value is how the term “autistic child” can conjure up the negative connotation and put a severe judgment and limit to the child’s abilities in our society (using “autistic” in front of child as an adjective).  We as a society needs to work towards eliminating ignorance on the subject of autism.  However in this case, we are of the opinion that “autism parent” conjures up something much different than the previous perception – perseverance, patience, super-mom/dad, expert and advocate.

This subject is one that more people should be aware of, if for no other reason than some of the people that fall on the spectrum are some of the best and brightest America has to offer, merely socially awkward. That, however, does not mean they are to be ignored as is all too often the case. We should help as many of them communicate with everyone else, because quite frankly, given the state of affairs we find ourselves in as a nation perhaps “normal” is not something we should strive for. We need to strive for better.

 

 

Jean is a first generation Korean immigrant, and a graduate of Virginia Tech with a Masters in Chemical Engineering, and a former Program Manager in the Defense Industry. Tim is an army veteran, Physicist and author of several books including The Forest of Assassins available on Amazon.com in print and kindle versions, with audiobook version coming soon.

 

 

 

by Timothy Imholt

For anyone who has read my blog posts you know I have opinions that really don’t fit with either of the two major political parties. I sit in a zone that is forgotten about largely called the common sense zone, and there is no place for that in government.

I have the Uncle Steve Imholt who recently retired. He spent multiple decades as a software engineer before becoming a software engineering manager for very large programs. He is no stranger to figuring out budgets, costs, and weaving his way through government forms. I should point out that many of the software programs he managed were for government contracts. The point is, if he can’t navigate through the hurdles of a Healthcare exchange program, who can?!?!?!?!

I got this email from him recently that made me wonder how we are all going to survive the “Affordable” Care Act Rollout. I won’t render any opinion on this entire healthcare law other than to say two things. There are some aspects of my family’s life that were once covered that now aren’t. The other is that the Allied Forces defeated Hitler during World War 2 in much less time than it is taking to get this healthcare exchange fixed.

 

Here is the emails, titled: NOT HAVING TO WORRY ABOUT PAYING FOR HEALTH CARE COULD END UP KILLING ME.

 

It’s April 14, 2015 and I’m still struggling to finish my taxes. Why? Because I stopped working in September 2014.

I suppose you could call it retirement. But retirement wasn’t supposed to be so much like working.

You see, after working in IT for a long time. A good chunk of that was in health care, in both hospitals, and in the insurance side. So when 2014 hit with a ton of medical bills and retirement, I decided to itemize my health costs on my tax return. That meant I had to pull in a load of different documents from my company health savings account, the amounts I had to finance for my dentures, and about 19 different kinds of medical bills and payments. As I’m plowing through this I’m thinking, Thank God, I left COBRA in December and for 2015 only have Coventry obtained through the Healthcare.gov website.

You say so what? Well you’re going to hear the rest of the story.

I enrolled in the health coverage back in December to begin January 1. At that point, I wrote an email to the marketplace and attached a copy of my separation doc from employer saying I ended employment in September. In the email I said I believed my income would be about $70K for 2015 (a highly optimistic estimate). Using that figure the site came back with a really substantial subsidy. Still not sure how that happened, but what the heck.

In January I get a letter from the Health Insurance Marketplace saying I had not supplied sufficient documentation to justify I was earning only 70K. Actually I was unemployed until mid-February when I took a part time job because I needed to do something (retirement isn’t coming easy to me). I did the part time job for a couple of weeks but frankly, it was a lot more physical than I had originally thought. So I stopped working that and we (the wife and I) applied for early Social Security. So I used that information to send back an updated list with my pay stub from the part time job. I also indicated I thought I would be getting income as I needed from my IRA, to get me up to the 70K. This runaround eventually resulted in a long set of phone calls to the Marketplace to get my records updated – again.

I was told we were good to go.

Anyway, a week ago Friday, my wife gets notice from Social Security that her benefits would start in April for March (only the government can tell you in advance how much you are going to get for the past). Then Monday the 13th I get a call from the Social Security Admin asking why I wanted to delay getting my SS payments until April. I told the nice lady that I’d take them as soon as they could start them. While I may be dumb, I ain’t stupid.

So now I get to Tuesday. At 7PM on Tuesday I get an email from the Healthcare marketplace that I had failed to provide proper documentation on my income so I was no longer receiving the subsidy effective May 1. It was immediately followed into my in basket with an email stating that because of my recent application I could apply for benefits through June 15.

My initial reaction was HUH??? It was followed by lots of words, most of them unprintable, a few unintelligible.

I went and got a drink. Uncle Sam would have to wait until tomorrow for my taxes.

***

It’s now 3 AM on April 15, and I can’t sleep. So I get back up, finish plowing through the remainder of turbo tax and finally about 6:30 AM have them ready to e-file.

I go down, tell the wife, I think we are good to go on the taxes, but the health care was still a FUBAR.

I then make some coffee and spend a couple of minutes with my grandkids.

I decide it’s time to tackle the Health Insurance Marketplace emails. So I call the folks in London Kentucky. The support person after figuring out who I was, started looking through my files and decided that yes there was indeed a problem. She should get credit for keeping me from just starting to whimper in submission to the government.   As she worked to figure out what had happened, it dawned on her and I that the SS payments that my wife was going to get was the reason our coverage had gotten s rejected.

She basically said, this was going to happen all over again, when they received word I was going to receive social security.

I decided to let that problem wait. But I did log back into the health exchange to see that my new friend at the exchange had emailed me to say I had until June 1 to get everything fixed.

I breathed a sigh of relief.

On Thursday morning I got an email from TurboTax saying my tax return had been rejected.

I tell you that this whole thing about Obamacare cutting the cost of health care is true. I’ll be dead long before I should have been making it work.

 

Why did I want to air this publicly? I see no end of ads coming in the next election cycle about all the smooth rollout of this health insurance exchange system.

If this is smooth, I would hate to see bumpy.

 

Timothy Imholt is the author of several novels, including the newly released book THE FINAL WORLD WAR, written around the premise that Iran does get nuclear weapons and decides to use them in the fashion they have openly stated they wanted to.

The Hill notices that the SEIU is saying one thing

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is lobbying hard against the amendment offered by Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) to repeal the healthcare reform law.

SEIU has sent e-mails to Senate offices urging lawmakers to vote against the proposal to unwind President Obama’s signature domestic initiative.

Their lobbying has proved effective:

every last Democrat voted no (Lieberman and Mark Warner missed the roll), which is a credit either to Reid and Durbin in keeping the caucus together or to the nutroots in intimidating vulnerable Dems with the prospect of primary challenges in 2012. For cripes sake, even Ben Nelson voted against it.

Meanwhile as they preserve the law for us for themselves it’s another story

SEIU’s outspoken defense of the law has prompted charges of hypocrisy from Republicans, given that some of the union’s chapters have sought waivers exempting them from a key provision of the law requiring the phaseout of health plans with low caps on annual benefits.

Michelle Malkin has been all over this

And the Service Employees International Union, which poured $60 million into Democrat/Obama coffers in 2008 and millions more into the Astroturf campaign for the federal health care takeover, added four new affiliates to the waiver list:

– SEIU Local 2000 Health and Welfare Fund, representing 161 enrollees
– SEIU 32BJ North Health Benefit Fund, representing 7,020 enrollees
– SEIU Local 300, Civil Service Forum Employees Welfare Fund, representing 2,000 enrollees
– SEIU Health & Welfare Fund representing 1,620

That’s in addition to three other previous SEIU waiver winners: Local 25 SEIU in Chicago with 31,000 enrollees; Local 1199 SEIU Greater New York Benefit Fund with 4,544 enrollees; and SEIU Local 1 Cleveland Welfare Fund with 520 enrollees — which brings the total number of Obamacare-promoting SEIU Obamacare refugees to an estimated 45,000 workers represented by seven SEIU locals.

And a fuller list listing all the other unions, is available here with the following note:

It is worth noting that there are 166 union benefits funds now exempted from this requirement, which account for about 40 percent of the exempted workers. This means that although there are only 14.6 million unionized employees in the United States, and 860,000 of them are already exempted from this provision of Obamacare.

Unions are huge democratic contributes, anyone who think this is a coincidence is fooling themselves

Reid BTW was very smart to get this vote over with ASAP, but I’m REALLY surprised that he didn’t give any of his folks cover. Either he figured it was early enough or that because of the first vote it wouldn’t have made a difference.

The Media will want to move away from this ASAP but the GOP will keep this vote in front of the faces for quite a while and if the opinion of the people I talk to door to door has any weight, it will be crushing come 2012.

Update: Hot air notices

The Obama administration seems very eager to impose regulation on everyone except their bestest buddies. If these policies are so bad that Obama’s friends and political allies need waivers to get around them, then perhaps they shouldn’t be in place at all. And perhaps the Obama administration should learn something about the rule of law, rather than the rule of whim — or as the rest of us call it, The Chicago Way.

Yup.

but the one thing you don’t do is mess with the blood supply:

A government health committee Friday recommended not changing the ban on gay men donating blood but also called for new research on alternative policies, citing flaws in the current rules.

Gay men have been prohibited from giving blood since 1985. But momentum to change the ban has grown recently, with advocacy groups, blood-collection organizations and members of Congress calling for the Food and Drug Administration to revise the donation rules.

The safety of the US blood supply is of paramount importance, once that is lost or confidence in it is lost all bets are off.

The American Plasma Users Coalition, representing people who depend on the blood supply to maintain health, urged additional research, forecasting that revisions in the donation rules eventually will be made.

But the coalition’s Mark Skinner also said, “It’s not about blood supply; it’s about blood safety … Ultimately the end-user bears 100 percent of the risk.’’

He said, “The fact that it’s discriminatory does not mean it’s wrong if it’s in the interest of public health.’’

Added Corey Dubin, a hemophiliac infected with HIV from a tainted blood product: “This is daily question of survival.’’

Forgetting the risk to lives for a moment if you want to increase litigation and cost to a healthcare system this is the way to do it.

…for those who are so keen to do so for the elderly, a quick question:

There is a story about how a sixteen year old sailor who is trying to sail around the world. There was a scare that she might be lost at sea:

A 16-year-old US sailor who went missing while sailing solo around the world has been found safe and well.

Abby Sunderland’s yacht was spotted by an aerial search team in the southern Indian Ocean, midway between Australia and Africa.

Three ships are on their way to pick her up – the first is expected to be with her in 24 hours.

Now I’m delighted that she is ok and will get home safely but I have a question.

Here is a person who on her own volition decided to put herself in mortal danger for the sake of doing something adventurous. Nobody forced her to take the risks she decided to take.

Yet when her parents lost contact ships and resources are being dispatched to get her out of a mess that she put herself into. Would those same people who are so willing to pull the plug on elderly people decide that it is a waste of considerable resources to save her too?

Of course I believe in erring on the side of life but I’d be very interested if they have the same utilitarian arguments in this case?

…it is because of stories like this:

A fifth of nurses interviewed by researchers admitted that they had been involved in the euthanasia of a patient based on the “assumption” they would want to die. Nearly half of the nurses – 120 of 248 – admitted they had taken part in “terminations without request or consent”.

Euthanasia has been legal in Belgium since 2002. It accounts for two per cent of all deaths annually. The law states that patient consent must be given and that doctors must carry out the procedure. But the study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal shows that the rules are routinely flouted and shows how doctors often delegate the administering of fatal drugs to nurses.

You know that old Hippocratic oath had something to it. If you work under the assumption that the job is to preserve life and always err on the side of life you don’t get this type of thing, but once the attitude changes and the idea of cost take precedence the equation changes.

This is the result of a post Christian Europe and it is on its way here. It will not take one year or even 5, but by the time many of those who supported this health care plan become old enough to need this care, they may find that they ended up voting for their own end. In fact you have candidates openly stating this type of stuff today.