The latest in my series of Interviews with Immigrants is with Margaret Mary from England. She is the first person from Europe in my set of interviews.

The full playlist:

Philippe from Haiti

Hanna from Iraq

Alvin from El Salvador

Maria from the Dominican Republic (translated by Christian from Puerto Rico)

Lucine from the Cape verde Islands

Donald from Cameroon

Margaret Mary, England.

You’ll note there is one interview listed on the map not on the playlist yet. I’m hoping for a 2nd part to said interview soon, if not then it will go up in a week or so..

My Interviews with Immigrants takes a shift toward Africa starting with Lucine who comes from the Cape Verde Islands

I found her comments on America’s eating habits very interesting

Donald not only has two jobs but holds duel citizenship both from Cameroon and Canada.

Donald is the first subject I’ve interviewed so far who came here as a youth

The full playlist:

Philippe from Haiti

Hanna from Iraq

Alvin from El Salvador

Maria from the Dominican Republic (translated by Christian from Puerto Rico)

Lucine from the Cape verde Islands

Donald from Cameroon


It’s been a bad tipjar year, we are in July and despite the booming economy we’ve raised barely 20% of last years total (which is why our expansion plans have been abandoned).

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Maria and Christian
The latest pair in my “interviews with immigrants” series is now up.

First I spoke to Alvin, he is in his mid 20’s and comes from El Salvador

Of the immigrants who I’ve interviewed story was slightly different. The rest of his family was already here but he choose to remain home until the violence became so bad it was a question of life and death.

Two weeks later I interviewed Maria from the Dominican Republic. She was iffy about her english so christian from Puerto Rico agreed to translate (and took that nice picture). Since he has only been here a year and the culture of Puerto Rico is different I included him in the interview as well even though technically he is not an immigrant because Puerto Rico is an American territory.

It worth noting that both Maria and Alvin had college educations where they lived but have been willing to work lesser jobs as they go back to school and learn english, it’s also worth noting that as I alluded to in my July 4th post while Maria wasn’t in the same immediate danger, it was the safety of America that brought her here.

A pair of notes, the delay in posting these interivews were mainly due to Pintastic 2018 coverage , I hope to conduct an interview with a young lady from the Cape Verde Islands this week and am in negociations to speak to another from Australia. My goal is to get 30 different countries before I start repeating countries but it’s likely that I won’t reach that number before that happens.

You’ll note that other than Phillipe from Haiti, who is very interested in politics, I don’t ask much along those lines. That’s because I’m more interested in getting the where’s and why’s about coming here and their impression of America as a country and Americans as a people. Those are the data points I’m trying to fill and educate myself on.


It’s been a bad tipjar year, we are in July and despite the booming economy we’ve raised barely 20% of last years total (which is why our expansion plans have been abandoned).

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As some of you might I have a “day” job that covers the bills since the finances of the blog have been a tad weaker than in the past. At said job the majority of the workforce was born outside the United States and English is not their first language.

With Immigration a huge issue these days I thought I’d take advantage of this situation. Last Thanksgiving I spoke to several people asking them what they were thankful for, and now over the past two months I’ve been arranging audio interviews with various people who have come here.

The subjects vary based on the people but there are several general questions that I ask about both their home countries about coming to America and the circumstances that caused them to come, what they expected, what they saw, etc etc etc.

Today I am posting the first two (technically three) of these interviews for your viewing pleasure. The first is with Philippe from Haiti. he is 70 year old former member of the Boston Teachers union who came to the US in the 70’s. He sat for two audio interviews that loaded consecutively onto a single youtube file.

Of the interviews I’ve conducted so far Philippe is the most political in nature and he is anxious to follow-up so don’t be surprised if we have another half hour or more in the future.

My second interview was with Hanna from Iraq. You might remember her from this Thanksgiving video:

That gave you a hint of what was coming and believe me you’ll find the story of a girl who started out in a land where she was basically property to being a “lead” at an American company at age 23 fascinating.

I have one more interview in the bank with another young man named Alvin from El Salvador and am scheduled to conduct another with a middle-aged woman named Maria from the Dominican Republic but be aware I’m not confining these interviews to my co-workers. I’ll be speaking to an immigrant from England living in New Hampshire and am actively seeking out others from various countries to get their perspective on life in America.

My plan is to conduct 2-4 of these done per month and upload them first to youtube and then put them out here at the blog. I hope to build a large library of people from as many countries as I can to get a feel of how and why people come and what their perception of America was and is. Occasionally a translator will be necessary but I’m less worried about the logistics as I am getting the information and the various perspectives from different people, different cultures and different backgrounds.

I hope you find this work interesting and informative. I suspect it won’t be as sensational as what the MSM is feeding you, but it will have the virtue of being unrehearsed and unspun, which is why it will likely not have anywhere near the reach.


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DaTech3.jpgIt isn’t exactly a pact with the devil, but a number of Roman Catholic churches and other religious organizations have made a deal with a vitriolic, anti-Trump group that backs illegal aliens.

The group, The New Sanctuary Movement, or NSM, has been around for 10 years, but it has been pushing its agenda more aggressively in recent months. Also, the organization has strongholds here in Philadelphia and cities throughout the country, including Austin, Boston, Denver, New York, Portland, and elsewhere.

For example, here is one of the recent statements of the organization: “Trump’s campaign of hate, racism, and exclusion took the White House. The backlash of white voters was harsh and strong, and Trump’s rhetoric now has the power of the White House behind it.”

But there’s more. “The organization has launched a campaign to recruit 1,000 people to disrupt immigration raids.”

Disruption of immigration raids rather than protests rises to the level of obstruction of justice, a felony under federal law.

The Santa Clara Law Review poses a variety of problems with the pact between the organization and religious groups.

“[The] churches face numerous dangers. First, their activities could be viewed as overly political and their section 501(c)(3) status {nonprofit] could be revoked. Second, their activities are not lawful because the defenses asserted in the 1980s by the Sanctuary Movement will not prevail here. Finally, given that even compromise legislation to provide legal status for all illegal immigrants has struggled to pass, the flagrant approach adopted by the New Sanctuary Movement may do more to fray nerves than to garner support for illegal immigrants facing deportation.”

Perhaps more important, the author argues that the harboring of immigrants in churches is almost certainly illegal under any interpretation of the law.

For more, download the article at https://digitalcommons.law.scu.edu/lawreview/vol50/iss3/7/

Not surprisingly, the MSM fawn over the NSM. Here is some nonsense from my hometown paper, The Philadelphia Inquirer: “…the overall goal is still big and formidable: to end injustice against immigrants, express radical welcome for all people, and uphold values of dignity and justice in practice and in policy.”

That reads like a TV commercial for the American military, with a flag waving in the wind and The Star Spangled Banner slowly rising in volume throughout.

But there’s even more. Here in Philadelphia three of the group’s organizers protested against their own leader, calling for his removal because he’s white.

Many Catholics like me voted for Trump. In fact, the vote mirrored the general election results, with whites voting largely in favor of the president and Hispanic Catholics supporting Hillary Clinton.

I don’t go to church to listen to political claptrap; I don’t think I am alone. Let’s leave the sanctuary movement to sort itself out rather than with the support of the church!

Although most of my European friends tilt toward the left of the political spectrum, immigration is an issue where they agree firmly and resolutely with the conservative perspective.

“They don’t speak the language. They don’t understand the culture. Many of them don’t work,” sniffs a French friend, who wants to see significant limits on the number of people allowed into France.

A longtime British diplomat notes that more than 50 percent of London residents were born outside the United Kingdom.

Even an Arab friend complains about those who wear Islamic garb in public.

If you think U.S. immigration is a mess, just take a look at Europe.

Demographers project more and more immigrants for decades to come. Annual net immigration into Europe is projected to increase steadily from current levels for another 20 years. This year, just over one million immigrants will arrive in Europe, according to Eurostat, the statistical agency of the E.U. That figure will reach nearly 1.5 million in 2036, the agency projects.

By 2080, these migrants and their families will have increased the population of the E.U. by 121 million, relative to what the continent’s population would be then without any immigration. The result will be a Europe that is substantially different than it is today.

For example, the number of European Christians is projected to decline by about 18 percent, to 454 million, by the middle of the century, according to the Pew Research Center. The organization predicts that the number of European Muslims will nearly double, to about 71 million.

In London, Brexit has stumbled along toward implementation, a policy that came about almost entirely as a rejection of the immigration policies of the E.U.
In Germany, Angela Merkel has had significant problems as a result of her open-door policy toward immigrants.

In France, the government has engaged in a significant crackdown on illegal immigrations. In a recent dispatch from Paris, The Associated Press notes that French President Emmanuel Macron, hardly a conservative, has launched significant changes in immigration policy.

“Critics contend that increasingly tough policy on migrants — though wrapped in a cloak of goodwill — contradicts his image as a humanist who defeated an anti-immigrant populist for the presidency, and has crossed a line passed by no other president in the land that prides itself as the cradle of human rights,” The AP says.

Interior Minister Gerard Collomb has ordered regional representatives of the state to crack down on illegal immigration, to act quickly to expel those who fail to gain asylum, and to report results immediately, according to a November order cited by the newspaper Le Monde.

Opposition to President Trump’s immigration policies may be getting a lot of bad press in the United States, but many of my European friends would welcome his approach in their own countries.

by baldilocks

Tom Mboya

When the students of the Mboya Airlift were hand-picked to come to America, it was for a specific purpose: to educate demonstrably gifted Kenyan and Tanzanian students in the Western tradition and to send them home to be the leaders and information venders of their countries—preparation for independence from the European colonial powers. One of these students was my biological father, journalist Philip Ochieng.

That was in the late fifties to early sixties and most of the students did return home. The Airlift was a privately funded endeavor by the likes of the Ford Foundation, the Kennedy Foundation, Jackie Robinson, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Harry Belafonte. I’m sure that there have been other experiments like it.

The recent tempest regarding President Trump’s alleged description of Haiti and African countries as s**tholes got me thinking again about this vehicle for my presence on earth and the concept of it. I believe it was an attempt to create an elite in the two countries – a rulership. If the intent was to lift these countries up close to the economic and social level of the freer Western nations, I’d say that it failed. But I doubt that this was the intent of the two foundations involved — though Mr. Belafonte, Mr. Robinson, and Dr. King, undoubtedly had nothing but the best of intentions.

A nation cannot be transformed through its leaders alone. But it can be manipulated by indoctrinating leaders and planting them.

In 1965, the US Congress passed a new immigration law and LBJ signed it. Suddenly, there was a flood of immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean and other non-European nations. Here came the Third World’s go-getters and risk-takers: the rest of the gifted students. And they’re still coming.

Meanwhile, back home, their friends and relatives remained mostly resigned to the old ways: kleptocracies, tribal wars, criminal cartels, monstrous pollution, deadly disease, etc.

I’ve seen a lot of outrage about the remarks from Haiti immigrants and immigrants from African countries. Some African leaders are calling for President Trump to apologize. Typical floor-showing.

But I’ve seen only one immigrant — a Nigerian — talk about going back home and making a difference there. Good luck, bro.

Most of the immigrants from the Third World thrive here and do not return to their countries of origin because it’s a lot easier and more profitable to stay here, have their children born as Americans, and raise them in relative safety and prosperity. And who can blame them? I certainly don’t.

But let’s stop pretending that they left some idyllic Trump-less places of beauty and peace. They left places that were dirty, stinky, dangerous and which have leaders who are blatantly corrupt.

A.K.A. …

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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Another day, another terror attack by a Muslim screaming Allahu Akhbar and another batch of media stories about that fabled Muslim Backlash that like global warming putting US coastal cities underwater never seems to happen.

Ahmad’s question was answered.

My biggest concern is that he’s readily identified as a Muslim and then that is extrapolated out to my own faith,” he said.

In the wake of Tuesday’s attack, some Muslim Americans and community leaders expressed concerns over how their religion would be perceived and whether Muslims would become targets of violence.

Despite the lack of a backlash over the last 17 year Ahmad and many like him, according to NBC and others are still very worried, but there is an easy solution to allay his fears.

This may seem counterintutative to some but the people who will most benefit from extreme vetting are people like Ahmad. Muslim Americans.

You see as long as the vetting of immigrants is suspect Jihadist will keep getting in and as long as Jihadist keep getting in to attack American Muslims like Ahmad will find themselves suspected.

However if vetting of immigrants is extreme enough to keep potential jihadists out by definition there are less potential Islamic terrorists here, and people’s confidence that American Muslims aren’t here to make jihad against the US increases. If that is combined with American Muslims vetting their own communities for either radical imam’s trying to radicalize communities or individuals who might get radicalized online that will really change the picture.

In the end every jihadist that Trump’s program keeps out is insurance against Muslim American’s fears of a backlash.

Because of this they should be the first to come out and say: “We Muslim Americans support extreme vetting because as far as we are concerned Jihadist and Radical Islamists are not welcome here. After all many of us came here to get away from that kind of thing.”

The day such an anouncement is made on behalf of the American Muslim community is the beginning of the end of the war on terror.


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A 17-year old with no visible means of financial support got an abortion this morning.

Not news, you say? Look again.

“Jane Doe” is an immigrant, an unaccompanied 17-year-old, living in the U.S. without benefit of documentation. When Jane Doe learned she was pregnant, she sought an abortion in Texas, where she is living. Disputes broke out, state and federal courts weighed in, and somewhere along the way Jane Doe was assigned a guardian to protect her interests.

The guardian enlisted the help of the American Civil Liberties Union, which jubilantly reported today that the abortion has been committed. “Justice prevailed today for Jane Doe,” went the ACLU tweet, one among many celebrating the death of a child’s child. #JusticeforJane, says the hashtag.

I suspect Jane Doe’s anonymity will dissolve when she turns 18, if not earlier, as she becomes a poster child for abortion advocates. Killing her child was worth a legal battle, to some people – more so than trying to regularize her residency status, apparently.

That’s a hellish way to become a celebrity. Whatever her immigration status, she deserves better than that.

Our country deserves better than to be thought of as an abortion haven, too.

I assume that as an immigrant without documentation, whose home is a U.S. detention center, she didn’t have money. Who paid to have her child killed? Was it you and me?

Human dignity lost today – the mother’s, the dead child’s, the abortionist’s, the abortion apologists’.

There’s surely a great deal about this 17-year-old that I don’t know. Why did she leave her homeland? Was she sent by her family, or did she decide on her own to cross the border? Was she pregnant when she got here? Did she become pregnant due to assault, and if so, is there as intense an effort to apprehend the perpetrator as there was to abort her child?

Whatever the answers, great things may yet lie ahead for her; better days, better choices.

Today isn’t a good day for her, no matter what her enablers are saying. Her child is dead, and abortion apologists are dancing on the remains. God have mercy on us all.

Alexandra DeSanctis said it better than I. “This is perhaps the most despicable thing about this entire ordeal — that justice in our modern world demands the blood of an innocent child. We have reached the point in the abortion debate where it is not only socially acceptable to crusade for the intentional killing of one specific unborn child, but where we are expected to applaud when that execution is carried out. How utterly shameful.”

Ellen Kolb is a writer and pro-life activist living in New Hampshire. She blogs at ellenkolb.com and Leaven for the Loaf, and she welcomes reader support.

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As a longtime reporter and journalism educator, I am ashamed of my profession as a result of the bias of the media toward the new immigration policies.

From the coverage, you couldn’t believe that 57 percent of those polled agree with the temporary ban on immigrants from seven countries, according to Rasmussen Reports. Only 33 percent oppose Trump’s executive order, while 10 percent are undecided.

The news media are in a full-tilt smackdown of Trump’s policies, underlining the administration’s notion that journalists are indeed the opposition.

For example, a CNN “news” report compares the executive order to the Alien and Seditions Acts, the Japanese internment camps and McCarthyism.

I address the following to the senior correspondent, Stephen Collinson, who apparently knows little about history, and others who have picked up the meme:

–Only a handful of people were not allowed into the United States.
–Green card holders are not affected.
–The ban is temporary for between 90 and 120 days.

The Alien and Sedition Acts existed during the presidency of John Adams. They allowed the government to toss people out of the country. More important, the main complaint about the acts was the ability to close down newspapers run by Adams’ opponents.

More than 100,000 Japanese and other aliens were interned during World War II by that champion of the Democrats: FDR.

While I do not condone Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s tactics, Soviet records confirmed that massive incidents of espionage occurred in the United States, including the placement of Russian spies into U.S. government positions.

An ABC journalist posted his personal views on Facebook about the terrible stuff that was happening while he was covering the immigration story at JFK. He did not respond to my question about whether he was a reporter or an advocate.

But there’s more. Philly.com, the host for the newspapers in Philadelphia, described the protestors at the local airport as a huge crowd. There were 200 people!

CNN’s sob stories start with a woman whose friend can’t make it to a wedding and goes downhill from there.

The Huffington Post had a column calling for the president’s impeachment. Seriously?

Hundreds of lawyers reportedly descended on airports to “help” people who were stuck in immigration, according to The Washington Post. The number of lawyers would greatly outnumber those who had temporary problems. As of this writing, no one was being held in immigration in the United States.

And, if you missed it, people were protesting against Uber for taking advantage of the immigration changes. That’s right, boys and girls, all of those immigrants who drive for Uber were not properly showing their solidarity with their comrades. That one is really hard to get my head around.

Having had the opportunity to travel to more than 60 countries during my lifetime, I have experienced the trials and tribulations of immigration laws throughout the world.

Egypt and Iraq expelled me for my reporting in those countries. Iran officials detained me during the hostage crisis because I was an American. My team faced expulsion in Ethiopia for leaving our hotel without a government guide. I was interrogated in France because immigration officials thought I was carrying explosive material in my luggage.

When I taught in Russia and Poland, I had to go through an elaborate visa process. I violated the immigration policies of Italy and the United Kingdom when I taught there because I stayed on a tourist visa.

For the past three years, I have taught in China. I needed to have an official letter from the university in order to obtain a visa.

I don’t begrudge any of these countries for the actions they took, although the Egyptians and Iraqis may have been a bit extreme. A nation has an obligation to protect its citizens from economic and political threats.

Having worked in the Arab world for nearly a decade, I think it would be difficult for anyone to call me an Islamophobe. Nevertheless, it is important to keep in mind that nowhere in the U.S. Constitution is there a right for foreigners to come to the United States as anything other than guests.

Despite the kerfuffle by hand-wringing demonstrators, few people were actually affected by the temporary–yes, that’s temporary–immigration policies. Homeland Security officials said that about 100 people who were already in transit to the United States when the order was signed were denied access; less than 200 were stopped before boarding planes heading to America.

If I heard a country had changed its policies, I don’t think I would get on a plane until I consulted with the embassy. Moreover, I probably would have used my visa on or about Jan. 19.

Finally, I recall when Jimmy Carter banned Iranians from traveling to the United States in 1979. Few people demonstrated against him or called him a racist. But he was a Democrat. That apparently makes all the difference.

The hysteria and the hyperbole really have to stop. But that’s probably not going to happen in a media world run amok.


Christopher Harper worked for The Associated Press, Newsweek, ABC News and The Washington Times. He teaches journalism.