By Steve Eggleston

In case you haven’t heard, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, chaired by Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN), unanimously reported favorably out of committee a bill that supposedly gives Congress a “right of refusal” on any agreement between the civilized world and Iran on Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

My immediate reaction, in the comments section of the Hot Air post, was that this is the “logical” extension of the 2011 cave on the debt ceiling to foreign policy. To wit, it’s a changing of an active Congressional approval to one of active Congressional disapproval in order to con those of us outside the DC bubble.

Andrew McCarthy has a longer explanation of this. As part of this, he links to the text of the bill itself, and a read of it is quite discouraging. Indeed, it’s nothing more than Kabuki theater.

The big item that is part of Corker’s bill is that it completely accedes to the notion that whatever agreement is reached is not only is an “executive agreement”, but one that requires no actual Congressional approval, much less the 2/3rds approval by the Senate a treaty requires. In fact, the bill explicitly allows for the waiving of all the sanctions against Iran if there is no action taken by Congress. In that respect, it’s worse than the various iterations of the “fast-track” trade negotiation authority that had existed for nearly the last 4 decades. Fast-track at least required the active approval of Congress.

With that said, given there wouldn’t be 2/3rds of Congress willing to override a Presidential veto of a maintenance of sanctions, it really doesn’t matter. According to the Congressional Research Service (courtesy the Federation of American Scientists), all of the statutory sanctions can be waived, and many of them outright terminated, by Presidential authority. In fact, the “prohibition” on those waivers during the Congressional review period specifically doesn’t apply to those made by mid-May, and arguably any made prior to the submission of a final agreement to Congress.

One could point to the fact that Congress would get semi-annual reports on Iran’s compliance with a nuclear deal, with an expedited consideration of a reimposition of sanctions as punishment for non-compliance, as a “positive”. However, given the punishment would require 2/3rds of both houses of Congress (after an Obama veto) to happen, and thus wouldn’t happen, it is equally meaningless.

There is an old saying in media that if you have bad news you save it for a Friday dump to try to bury it.

And if you really want to dump it, Good Friday where many people are either in church or traveling for Easter is even better.

This is the standard plan for use against any person beyond the intelligence of a Memories Pizza truther or a writer for Vox

So for the moment when considering the Iran deal lets forget the potential middle east nuclear arms race, or the dancing in the streets in Iran or the Iranians already claiming the administration is lying about the deal or even the possibility of Israel deciding to launch a preemptive first strike against Iran and ask yourself this.

If this Iran deal was any good wouldn’t they have waited till after the Easter Weekend for the announcement so they could have used every bell and whistle in the White House media arsenal? 

I’d be more upset if it wasn’t for the fact that we as a nation willingly voted for these losers a 2nd time and are reaping what we sowed.

MSNBC doesn’t get a lot of viewers so if you are on the right you might have missed Ted Cruz who got a full 15 minutes on Morning Joe on Tuesday

Cruz did an excellent job and like Scott Walker didn’t back down and inch and did an excellent job of pitching his ideas to an audience that likely has never heard them without the left’s filter. Many fail to get how important it is to make the case to the other side you won’t persuade but a few, but that’s a few more than you had before.

It speaks well of Cruz that he was willing to go, but let me also tip the Hat to Morning Joe who had him on and gave him a full 15 minute segment to make his case.