You know the Boston Globe has for years had the best coverage of Baseball period, with John Allen they now have the best Catholic reporter in the world and he proved it again:

Pope Francis can be understood as a living, breathing embodiment of the “both/and” instinct that’s so much a part of Catholic DNA, but which is increasingly difficult to understand in a world where false dichotomies and “wedge issues” are the political coin of the realm.

Historically, as Pope Benedict XVI once put it, Catholicism has been the great Christian tradition of “both/and.” When Protestantism raised the question of whether Scripture or tradition is the basis of authority, Catholicism answered “both.” Likewise, when Martin Luther asked whether salvation is from faith or works, the Catholic answer again was “both.”

Francis is very much like that.

and he gives an excellent example of the dual nature of the church

A gay couple wants to enroll their child in a Catholic school. One option would be to say no, on the grounds of causing scandal. Another is to say yes, on the basis that some contact with the faith is better than none. Both are consistent with church teaching, but they give off different vibes.

Or to put it another way Christ over and over warns about the Justice that will come if one doesn’t repent:

Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you accursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, a stranger and you gave me no welcome, naked and you gave me no clothing, ill and in prison, and you did not care for me.’ Then they will answer and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or ill or in prison, and not minister to your needs?’

He will answer them, ‘Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.’ And these will go off to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

Matthew 25:41-46

Yet when dealing with an actual sinner with actual sin the mercy pours out as in the gospel for this week:

Jesus went to the Mount of Olives.

But early in the morning he arrived again in the temple area, and all the people started coming to him, and he sat down and taught them. Then the scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery and made her stand in the middle. They said to him, “Teacher, this woman was caught in the very act of committing adultery. Now in the law, Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” They said this to test him, so that they could have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and began to write on the ground with his finger. But when they continued asking him, he straightened up and said to them, “Let the one among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” Again he bent down and wrote on the ground. And in response, they went away one by one, beginning with the elders.

So he was left alone with the woman before him. Then Jesus straightened up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She replied, “No one, sir.” Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, and from now on do not sin any more.

John :1-11

God will give us our entire lives to repent and will give us every chance to do so, but not a moment more.

Somehow I suspect Francis thinks the same and wants to do the same.

 

It’s not often that the Boston Globe’s news coverage is worthy of praise, but their acquisition of John Allen Jr. to cover the Vatican is producing some of the most informative and professional coverage the Globe has even seen

Can it really just be diplomatic happenstance that the date set this week for the prayer summit bringing Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli President Shimon Peres together with Pope Francis at the Vatican is a day of particular moment on the Christian calendar?

The June 8 gathering, to which Francis invited the two leaders during his recent trip to the Middle East, will coincide with the Christian feast of Pentecost, when the Bible reports that the Holy Spirit descended on the disciples after Jesus had ascended to Heaven, transforming them from a timid bunch cowering in an upper room into the most fearless missionaries the world has ever seen.

Perhaps in private, Francis is hoping for a similar miracle this time around.

Those paragraphs show a real understanding of not only the Catholic faith but of this pope. An understanding the secular media doesn’t have.

Moreover this piece notes that while in a secular that dismisses prayer (but somehow embraced a generic “spiritually”) as a meaningless thing. No matter what the faith The function of prayer is meaningful to the believers:

Jews and Muslims have their own sensitivities about praying with followers of other religions, while for Catholics, Pope John Paul II’s 1986 prayer summit in Assisi, Italy, the birthplace of St. Francis, opened a debate about the limits of interfaith prayer that has never really ended.

It will be fascinating to see what kind of ritual organizers invent, and whether it includes joint prayer or rather separate prayers in the same space.

That’s an insight that Globe readers should be grateful for, moreover he put the entire event into proper perspective:

At the level of realpolitik, it’s not yet clear if the pope’s brand of politics can move the ball, but perhaps that’s not the right test for a distinctly religious actor.

“I realize political credibility is important in this world,” said American Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, “but it’s more important to be faithful to God. … He’s counting on the Lord, and you can’t tell the pope that’s not the right thing to do.”

McCarrick, a veteran diplomatic troubleshooter, spoke to the Globe in Jerusalem during the papal visit.

The pope, he said, “is not putting himself out on a limb, he’s putting himself up on the Cross, and that’s what he’s called to do.”

In any event, he’s certainly doing it in his own unique way.

This is only a small sample of a large piece that covers a lot more ground than the upcoming event of the 8th. (The Anchoress notes a rather significant part that deserves more of my attention at a later date) but for now let me recommend that you avail yourself of Mr. Allen’s insight and perhaps drop the Globe a line commending them on their move.

Perhaps you can show more appreciation than their commentators do.