sheepdogby baldilocks

We are almost at the end point of the Herding™ .

From me, in 2010:

[B]lack Americans have become the organized Left’s shock troops in latter’s war against America and all too many of us have become the Left’s overseers, tasked to force the “deserters” back into formation using the tools of ridicule and shame. I almost said that the Left was at war with black people, but the Left doesn’t esteem blacks enough to consider us as their enemies. We are merely tools to be used for the task at hand—to foment violent racial discord which will have to be put down using infinitely stronger government violence–and to be discarded when the task is completed, assuming that there will be any of us left after the New Civil War.  And we let ourselves be used for one reason: tribal vengeance; for slavery and for oppression.

The New Civil War has been mostly skirmishes, though, to the losers of these skirmishes, they feel more like mini-tribal wars, no doubt.

Last night in Chicago, an real battle occurred. It wasn’t a tactic that resembled Fort Sumter, but its strategic significance may be similar, though it’s yet too early to tell. But there will be more like this; more violence, more injuries and more death.

The backdrop of race and politics is important, but they are of secondary importance. Americans are being pushed by unseen forces into a place which there is no way out other that an escape which God provides, and, in order for Him to provide it, we have to ask Him. Seems simple enough, but you know as well as I that there are many, many people who would rather take their chances using their own strength and discernment—such as it is—rather than even admit that God exists, much less ask Him for anything.

From a friend today:

It depends on who you are following and who your “shepherd” is. It is either the things of this world, the devil, and pursuit of earthly treasures for the here and now; or, it is the Great Shepherd. Jesus did speak of the blind leading the blind; and, they both fall into the ditch together.

Popcorn and ammunition salesmen must be getting rich beyond their wildest dreams, and good on them. But it’s better to rely on the One who provides popcorn, and ammo, and the riches of wisdom, and insight.

Otherwise, the chains await. And once you’re pinned down and penned in, good “luck” getting out.

By the way, a certain Mr. Ayers tweeted this today.

billayers

Now you can’t say that you don’t know what the endgame is.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocks

One of the many reasons that Star Trek: Deep Space Nine was my favorite of the several Trek incarnations was its pilot episode “Emissary.” In it, we first meet Commander Benjamin Sisko, a widower, the father of a young son, Jake, and previously, the first officer of the USS Saratoga which was destroyed in Trek’s infamous Battle of Wolf 359. His wife, Jennifer, has been dead for three years—killed at Wolf 359–and he has languished at a desk job since that time. In the beginning of the series, he takes command of Space Station Deep Space Nine without much enthusiasm, and contemplates retiring from Starfleet when his task at the station is finished.

Fast forward to the pivotal scene of the pilot: here is Sisko as he teaches the prophets—a group of non-linear alien beings who have abducted him and who use the appearance of person and scenarios which are familiar to him—about linear existence using his favorite game as a metaphor.

[On a baseball field]

Avery Brooks as Benjamin Sisko
Avery Brooks as Benjamin Sisko

BATSMAN-Alien: Aggressive. Adversarial.
SISKO: Competition. For fun. It’s a game that Jake and I play on the holodeck. It’s called baseball.
JAKE-Alien: Baseball? What is this?
SISKO: I was afraid you’d ask that. I throw this ball to you and this other player stands between us with a bat, a stick, and he, and he tries to hit the ball in between these two white lines. No. The rules aren’t important. What’s important is, it’s linear. Every time I throw this ball, a hundred different things can happen in a game. He might swing and miss, he might hit it. The point is, you never know. You try to anticipate, set a strategy for all the possibilities as best you can, but in the end it comes down to throwing one pitch after another and seeing what happens. With each new consequence, the game begins to take shape.
BATSMAN-Alien: And you have no idea what that shape is until it is completed.
SISKO: That’s right. In fact, the game wouldn’t be worth playing if we knew what was going to happen.
JAKE-Alien: You value your ignorance of what is to come?
SISKO: That may be the most important thing to understand about humans. It is the unknown that defines our existence. We are constantly searching, not just for answers to our questions, but for new questions. We are explorers. We explore our lives, day by day, and we explore the galaxy, trying to expand the boundaries of our knowledge. And that is why I am here. Not to conquer you either with weapons or with ideas, but to co-exist and learn.

[Scene switches to the doomed USS Saratoga in Sisko’s quarters as he leans over Jennifer’s dead body.]

TACTICAL-Alien: If all you say is true, why do you exist here?

The prophets force Sisko to face the fact that, by living in the grief and anger produced by Jennifer’s death, he has stopped trying to live up to his own standard.

This is what we all do at various points in our lives. And our task in life isn’t to beat ourselves up for being imperfect in what we say we believe—for failing–but to get back up off of the floor and keep pushing and pressing on, using what we have left. Sisko still had his son and discovers by the end of the pilot–and the end of the series–that he has much more than he was able to imagine at the point where we first meet him. This was good TV.

And it demonstrates something essential about the relationship between inner-core beliefs/principles and the fallen nature of humanity: temporarily falling away from the former doesn’t make them any less true or correct…and doesn’t make them any less yours. And the great part about principles which are solid and true is that returning to them will help you dig yourself out of the ditch into which life has deposited you.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocks

Okay, it’s Throw Stuff up Against the Laptop Screen Day to see what sticks.

I’m enjoying the irony of American Sanders supporters lecturing me, a former Soviet citizen, on the glories of Socialism and what it really means! Socialism sounds great in speech soundbites and on Facebook, but please keep it there. In practice, it corrodes not only the economy but the human spirit itself, and the ambition and achievement that made modern capitalism possible and brought billions of people out of poverty. Talking about Socialism is a huge luxury, a luxury that was paid for by the successes of capitalism. Income inequality is a huge problem, absolutely. But the idea that the solution is more government, more regulation, more debt, and less risk is dangerously absurd.

  • I actually read as someone said that he wouldn’t take political advice from a “chess player”—as if Kasparov were somebody’s grandpa playing chess in the park every day. And the idea that one needs to be some sort of professional to have a valid opinion on politics points to how the DC political class was born…and how the opinions of the normal citizen became unimportant.
  • Yesterday at my blog, I talked about how anger and pride are blinding forces when we act under their influences.
  • Lastly, there are always black Americans who want to go “back” to Africa. Well, I’ve been “back” and unless you’re willing to work, Back-To-Africa sorts, I suggest you stay here and complain.
  • Here’s a job that’s popular in Kenya.
Cows - Copy
Saw hundreds of grazing herds with their shepherds between Nairobi and Manyatta
  • Somehow, I don’t think that most of you whiny brats are up to growing your own meat.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

*****************************************************************

I’m back trying to get that elusive $61 a day for DaTipJar.

It’s been a rough few days but I chalk it up to being so busy I didn’t get my email blasts out

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by baldilocks

Jiggety-Jig. I’m back in Los Angeles and with a fair amount of sleep under my belt, though I expect to take another beauty nap today.

What can one say about the trip of a lifetime? First of all, that one week is far too short a time for such a visit.

Oh, and traveling is a headache and a half—other than KLM Airlines, which believes in feeding its charges well and leaving them alone for the most part. Note: if you are ever flying out of Jomo Kenyatta Airport, make sure your flight leaves in the evening and make sure to leave for the airport five hours ahead of time. The airport has five layers of security checks—understandable, in light of the many deadly Islamic terror actions which have been carried out in Kenya since 1998—but, along with the usually international flying procedures, they take a lot of time.

And don’t even get me started about LAX.

My father and my 21-year-old nephew, Philip, Junior, met me at Kenyatta Airport to see me away back to Los Angeles.Ochiengs

Philip, his sister, Sarah, their first cousin Jeniffer, and Sarah’s 4 month-old son, Kyle, were assigned to babysit their American auntie during our trips back and forth to Rongai and to Manyatta and I feel so blessed to know these young members of my family. (My next trip: Albuquerque to see my American nieces and nephews.)

And I have a few souvenirs.

ElephantFruitBowl

RiftValleyTrayTop

RiftValleyTrayBottom2

GOP.RINO

 

Africa

Fan

The elephant fruit bowl, the fan, the continent-shaped jewelry box and the animals are gifts from the family. The elephant-RINO symbolism in the tiny, carved animals is mere serendipity. Notice how I posed them.

I plan to see Kenya again before the end of the year and that’s what I’m working toward as I finish two books.

I called my mom this morning. Mothers are so funny. She had called me on the 28th while I was in the air sounding all worried. (My cell has no service outside of the country.) I’m 54 and a USAF retiree. It certainly isn’t the first time that I’ve been abroad. But my mom worries, still. That’s my mom.

And now I will have two dads wondering aloud when I’m getting married again. Life is good.

(Thanks to Asher Abrams–the author of this trip. Friends for life.)

PREVIOUSLY:

Sojourn in Kenya: Surveying the Ancestral Lands
Sojourn in Kenya: Acorn Meets Tree

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocks

I spent two days at my father’s ancestral lands in Manyatta, Awendo–no Internet–on which his permanent house is being built. Judging from the time it takes to get back and forth from Nairobi by car, I had originally though this land was 400-500 miles away from the capital, but I’m used to interstate highways. Slightly less than 300 miles takes longer on two-lane paved roads and the occasional bumpy, dirt road. As I mentioned in an earlier post, Father and his wife live in Rongai, but Manyatta is his birthplace and the place to which he will eventually retire and be buried, like his parents and several other relatives. We went to Manyatta because also on the land is the home of my only brother, Charles, and his wife, Lillian. Surround that parcel of land are other parcels belonging to various members of the Otani-Ochieng clan. The land originally belonged to my father’s father, Nicanor Otani[1], and his brothers.

It’s weird for this American to know that there are ancestral lands for my family. But my life has been a half-century of weirdness.

There are two large gates to the land, one for Father and one for my brother. There is electricity in but it’s spotty; we spent several long time periods having our faces lit by oil lamps and flashlights. There is no central plumbing or gas yet, but there is a well and family cooking is done the old-fashioned way.

Fresh Water
Fresh Water
Cooking without gas
Cooking without gas

I think my bro could teach American preppers a thing or two. He also has chickens and cows, but it seems to me that no self-respecting Kenyan man-of-the-land is without at least four cows. I saw so many herds while on the road that I will be thinking about steaks for a month.

Aside from a night during which my intestinal tract reminded me that, no, Toto, we are not in California anymore, the time was fascinating and heart-warming, if a bit bewildering. The day before I returned to Nairobi, all local family and friends gathered to meet me, honor me, and welcome me home.

More photos from Manyatta here and here.

[1] Among the Luo, it’s not customary to take the last name of one’s father. Each kid gets his/her own last name. The name is determined by the conditions under which the child is born, i.e. morning, noon, night, raining, etc. The last name also varies in the spelling with regard to gender: girls’ last names begin with A, boys’ with O. With Western and Islamic influences, many Kenyans use their fathers’ last names, but some still don’t. However, even those who use the European system of naming still have a “middle” name; more accurately, a surname and a patronymic.

CharlesO
My brother. This was the first time we had met in person. Ever.

Since I was born in the US, I was given my father’s last name, but I have my own surname: Akinyi. It’s permissible to call me by this name alone, but in my family, it can get confusing. One of my sisters has the same surname.

And Luo have taken their own spin on the name game. My brother’s name is Charles Otieno Ochieng and his oldest son is named after his grandfather: Philip Ochieng Otieno, Jr. Of course, everyone calls him Junior. Between the surname and the patronymic is the unspoken “son of/daughter of.”

OH. ONE MORE THING:

I leave for home tomorrow. Final trip log(s) will be here or at baldilocks on Tuesday at the latest, assuming I’m awake by then.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: Her Kenya Trip Expenses, Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

*************************************************************************

While Baldilocks is in Kenya I’ve had a busy day. After mass moved furniture for DaSon #1 moving out Covered the Governor making an appearance in a local race (That will go up tomorrow) and did some legwork for a local pro-life republican, didn’t get a chance to get our email blast out till 6:30 which likely explains why for the first time in a while we’ve seen a day when our DaTipjar and our $61 a day goal hasn’t moved a bit. We’re already behind 20 days for our annual goal and with the layoff I’d hate to see it our backlog expand so if you are both able and inclined I’d really appreciate it if you’d help us close that gap by hitting DaTipJar.

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by baldilocks

Nairobi, Kenya 2/24/2016 12:00 AM:

This post is mostly a stream of consciousness and mostly an excuse to post a few photos. The bulk of the really good photos will be posted on Saturday, for reasons specified below.

I arrived here on Monday at 8:00 PM, Kenya time, and slept great that night in a queen-sized Hilton Nairobi bed, but jet lag still hit me hard on Tuesday afternoon. My Kenyan parents have extremely comfortable couches.

Nairobi traffic is a vision of Hell. My young nephew-in-law, Samson, got out of the taxi and put his body on the line for the second photo.NairobiTraffic (1) NairobiTraffic (4)

My father lives in Rongai. He is small-statured, slim, and upright in bearing. I’m slightly taller than he is, but that’s probably due to his age. (I’ve noticed that my American parents are shrinking too.)  I’m much taller than my three Kenya sisters because my mother is tall.

JulietteandPhilipOchieng (2)

Father cares for his wife, Miss Jennifer, with the help of my sisters Lucy Adhiambo and Judith Aluoch. (Another Kenyan sister, Janet Akinyi, lives in Texas.) As a result of several diabetic strokes, Miss Jennifer is an invalid. Having taken care of my great-aunt in her last years, I empathize greatly.

Nairobi has an old crumbling feeling. The people, however, are the opposite. Young, hard-working, friendly and incredibly handsome. And I don’t just say that because I look like them. I’m just as grateful for my American heritage as of the African, but because of the former, I missed out on the smooth, blemish-free skin. And it has only been since reaching my 50s that the battle of the zits has been won. Mostly.

As far as I’ve seen, if there are morbidly obese people here, they don’t come out in public. Most everyone seems slim and graceful. I flew in on the Dutch carrier, KLM Airlines, and noticed that middle-aged Dutch people are mostly in good shape, too, not to mention really tall. O-beasts must be an American thing.

Ochieng House (1)
Ochieng House in Rongai

I was introduced to one of my two grand-nephews, Kyle, four months old.

Juliette and Kyle (5)

Tomorrow, I get to meet Nigel, two-years-old and one of the two stars of my Facebook page–the other being my American nephew, Jacob, also two. I guess there are three stars now!

My father and I were interviewed yesterday by a KTN reporter named Wilkester Nyabwa—a lovely young lady–for a human interest piece on our reunification. It will run on Saturday, Friday in the USA. I feel a tad bit like…not an imposter…but unworthy of all the hullaballoo made here in Kenya about my visit. I’ve long known that my father was famous on this continent, but felt removed from it. Not anymore. Fame makes a man think things over, to misquote a recently deceased philosopher.

Oh and my father and I exchanged copies of our books. That was really cool!

Ochieng Books (3)

For the next two days, my family and I will be away from Nairobi and out in our ancestral province. So I will be away from all things Internet, but it will be the opportunity for the best photos! Yes, I’m taking my anti-malarial meds and have my insect repellent handy.

My family members are all sweet, kind and funny. They all speak English, with Kenya having been a British colony, but I don’t yet have an ear for their accents and I did notice that, sometimes, my B-Girl/Valley Girl twang goes by them as well. It’s fun.

Everyone here tells me welcome home. Well, America is my home and always will be. But it’s nice to have two homes…and two wonderful families. Of course, it’s really just one big family.

To be continued on Saturday.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: Her Kenya Trip Expenses, Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocksfoundation

Recently, as I engaged in a heated, but civil argument about Syrian refugees in America, one of the participants was questioning (rightly) the Christianity of those who opined that we should “kill them all,” meaning Muslims. Others responded that Islamic doctrine would have Muhammad’s followers to kill all of us and this gentleman reminded us that the Bible has its violent passages, but he didn’t seem to know why these things were there—why Yahweh commanded the ancient Israelites to kill all members of certain groups. He even characterized the commands as Yahweh commanding the Israelites also to kill all non-believers (false)—as is actually commanded as a sacrament to worshipers of Allah. I was nonplussed, since the man in question—a nice, intelligent, well-informed individual—is a Messianic Jew.

After I urged him to re-read the Old Testament, the conversation turned back on its original path. Then someone who, obviously hadn’t been following the thread said to me: “I don’t have to read the Old Testament; I’m a Christian. Jesus was not a conqueror, but an evangelist.” Leaving aside that this person addressed my point outside of its context—I had only been talking one person, a person who had specifically cited the Old Testament—and leaving aside that Jesus the Christ conquered death, Hell, and the grave, I want to address the assertion that Christians “don’t have to read the Old Testament.”

The second man was right: no one has to read anything. And there is only one thing which a person has to do in order to be saved from going to Hell. But I think anyone who has read my Facebook note, The Miseducation of the American Christian Negro, can guess what I think about biblical ignorance among Christians, especially about the willful variety.

The Christian who believes—notice that I didn’t say ‘thinks’—that the Old Testament is a disconnect from the New Testament fails to understand the value of foundation. There is a reason that America’s value system is called Judeo-Christian. Christianity is based on Judaism and the Old Testament—the Torah—is Judaism.

The Old Testament entire purpose is to point to Jesus the Messiah. As many pastors have put it, the OT is the NT concealed and the NT is the OT revealed. Chuck Missler calls the entire Bible an Integrated Message. There are 300+ prophecies of Jesus’ incarnation in the OT, including one that got my attention: the genealogy from Adam to Noah. All of the names in that genealogy form two sentences.

Hebrew English
Adam Man
Seth Appointed
Enosh Mortal
Kenan Sorrow
Mahalalel The Blessed God
Jared Shall come down
Enoch Teaching
Methuselah His death shall bring
Lamech The Despairing
Noah Rest, or comfort

Man is appointed mortal sorrow; the Blessed God shall come down teaching that His death shall to the despairing rest. It’s a prophecy of Jesus the Christ.

Missler concludes that

It demonstrates that in the earliest chapters of the Book of Genesis, God had already laid out His plan of redemption for the predicament of mankind. It is a love story, written in blood on a wooden cross which was erected in Judea almost 2,000 years ago.

When I began writing this post, it was before the publication of David Limbaugh’s The Emmaus Code: Finding Jesus in the Old Testament. I stopped composing the post in order to read the book, which I obtained from the LA Public Library. So far, it’s making the points that I made above, but since I’m heading out of the country tomorrow and the book is due back before I come back, I have to bring it back and get it again after my return. So, instead of fully make the case on my own, I suggest that you read Mr. Limbaugh’s book.

Or, like a Berean, search it out for yourself.

Reminder: I leave for Kenya tomorrow, but I’ll still be posting on my regular schedule here, correct calculations of time zone differences willing.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocks

The trip had to be postponed for a week while I got some necessities in order. So now I’m leaving on the 21st of February and will only stay for a week.

My brother, Charles Otieno–who I have not yet met in person—has my schedule all planned. Family and more family. I’m praying for no jet-lag. (Aside: I had no jet-lag after my two trips to Germany, but when I traveled to Japan, I was dead tired for a week. I’m think that the direction of travel makes a difference; at least, I’m hoping that’s the case.)

All of my American friends and family are very excited about this and, of course, I am as well, though I have some trepidation. Besides the family factor, I did not comprehend the magnitude of my father’s fame in Kenya and my family tells me that the trip is a really big deal there. I’m naturally introverted, but I’m hoping to squash that. I want to represent my country—the USA—well.

There has already been a cultural misconception about the trip. As most know, I’m raising money for the trip’s expenses—something that is pretty commonplace among bloggers. But after Kenya’s Daily Nation reported on the fund-raising campaign, Kenyans assumed that I was asking them to fund my trip. That was definitely not my intention. I plan on correcting more misconceptions when I get there, but remember Kenyans are not the only people who misconstrue things and run with them.

Other than that, the campaign has gone well, though the GoFundMe goal has not been reached and I don’t expect it to be—not for this trip. But I think that there is already enough. Thank you for your generosity.

PREVIOUSLY: Destination: Kenya

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

by baldilocks

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, 79, died today in Texas while on a hunting trip.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott:

He was the solid rock who turned away so many attempts to depart from and distort the Constitution. We mourn his passing, and we pray that his successor on the Supreme Court will take his place as a champion for the written Constitution and the Rule of Law. Cecilia and I extend our deepest condolences to his family, and we will keep them in our thoughts and prayers.

At another site, I opined that he got out just in time—for himself, at least.

Antonin_Scalia_Official_SCOTUS_Portrait
Official SCOTUS Portrait

Justice Scalia’s death, while a personal tragedy for his family, is also one for this country. And it points to the importance of presidential ideology and decision-making, since it is the president who nominates the court’s candidates. With Justices Kagan and Sotomayor, we get two examples of the type of judicial philosophy that President Obama looks for in his Supreme Court justices.

Many opinion-makers on the conservative side of politics are looking to the Republican-lead U.S. Senate to block any of President Obama’s nominations until January 2017 and this has precedent. But if the Democrat nominee for president wins the election, such an unlikely stand would be for naught.

The game has changed.

A lot of people out there are nervous now, and not only conservatives. Justice Scalia, along with Justices Thomas and Alito, had often been the only things standing between the people of the United States and full-on tyranny.

But, as I said to a friend a few minutes ago, God sometimes forces the hands of those of us who are called by His name. He is our only steadfast protector and will always be if we ask Him and trust in Him. I say let’s go for it.

Enjoy your reward, Mr. Justice Scalia.

My Kenya trip has been postponed for one week; I leave on the 21st.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

Shut-Upby baldilocks

This is why my novel is self-published and why my next two (three?) books will be self-published as well.

From sci-fi author Nick Cole, via his fellow sci-fi scribe John C. Wright:

Banned by the Publisher

Or, Thank God for Jeff Bezos

I launched a book this week and I went Indie with it. Indie means I released it on Amazon via Kindle Direct Publishing. I had to.

My Publisher, HarperVoyager, refused to publish it because of some of the ideas I wrote about in it.

In other words, they were attempting to effectively ban a book because they felt the ideas and concepts I was writing about were dangerous and more importantly, not in keeping with their philosophical ideals. They felt my ideas weren’t socially acceptable and were “guaranteed to lose fifty percent of my audience” as related back to me by my agent. But more importantly… they were “deeply offended.”

A little backstory. A few years back I wrote a novel called Soda Pop Soldier. It was the last obligated novel under my first contract. The novel was a critical hit (Starred Review in Publisher’s Weekly) and it resonated with my post-apocalyptic readership from my breakout Amazon best seller, The Old Man and the Wasteland, and it picked up a new audience in the cyberpunk and gamer crowd. The novel is about a future dystopia where people play video games for a living. It’s basically Call of Duty meets Ready Player One and a lot of people really enjoyed it. When it came time to write another book for Harper Collins I was encouraged by my editor to dip once more into the Dystopian Gamer milieu and tell another story inside the Soda Pop Soldier universe. We agreed on a prequel that told the story of how that future became the way it is in Soda Pop Soldier.

And that involved talking about Artificial Intelligence because in the dystopian gaming future, the planet had almost been destroyed by a robot revolution sourced by Artificial Intelligence.

And here’s where things went horribly wrong, according to my editor at Harper Collins. While casting about for a “why” for self-aware Thinking Machines to revolt from their human progenitors, I developed a reason for them to do such.

Link added in text. Read on and find out what Harper Collins fears. Hint: intelligence.

Side note: in Tale of the Tigers, my first publisher didn’t like a line of dialogue I put in the mouth of one of my characters, but he had no choice; I was paying to be published. The conversation’s topic? Islam.

I’m hoping that my trip to Kenya lays the foundation for one of my future books, as well. Click to assist.

UPDATE: Larry Correia’s take on the situation is longer and far more entertaining than mine.

Kenya Trip Wishlist at Amazon.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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