by baldilocks

Discovering the fallaciousness of an idea previously thought to be true can be traumatic. Indeed, some will refuse to even consider the fault lying in the foundation of an idea–in its premises–even when the hole in it is wide and deep.

Such is the case with respect to and discrimination in private business. You’re not allowed to do it (anymore), right? Well, that means that signs like this are mere bluster and delusion.

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If you can’t refuse to serve blacks, disabled, gays, etc., then you don’t have that reservation. It’s that simple. You don’t think so? Read Title II of the Civil Rights Act again.

So when you see things like this happen, you shouldn’t be surprised.

Two Christian ministers who own an Idaho wedding chapel were told they had to either perform same-sex weddings or face jail time and up to a $1,000 fine, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in federal court.m

[snip]

According to the lawsuit, the wedding chapel is registered with the state as a “religious corporation” limited to performing “one-man-one-woman marriages as defined by the Holy Bible.”

But the chapel is also registered as a for-profit business – not as a church or place of worship – and city officials said that means the owners must comply with a local nondiscrimination ordinance.

That ordinance, passed last year, prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation, and it applies to housing, employment and public accommodation.

The CRA cracked the foundation of our country, further inserting government tentacles into private property. And the ingenuousness of CRA is this: it seems to guarantee the rights of those who are not white male Christians. Because of that perception, it will be impossible to fix without a whole lot of Sturm und Drang (in English, SHTF) about the rights of non-whites.

But all it really does is reserve the “right” of government to tell you how to conduct “your” business, actual rights be damned…no pun intended…or advise you of the consequences of resisting government regulation in this area. It’s a fifty-year-old fraud perpetrated on the American people. We’re seeing groups take advantage of the fraud more and more because the ideological children of the fraudsters have become emboldened of late.

I can’t imagine why that is so. (sarc)

Resistance is futile, baby

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2014.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

 baldilocks

by baldilocks

Remember the 2008 “Bitter Clinger” saga? Perhaps you don’t.

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Back when most people were still giving Barack H. Obama the benefit of the doubt and still thinking “wouldn’t it be cool to have a black president,” he was dropping huge clues left and right as to his attitude toward the bulk of the American people and to the values which most of us hold dear. Unfortunately, many of us refused to hear the plan contempt issuing right from his lips. It was pretty plain to me; and I did tell you so. (The words in italics are mine.)

Mickey Kaus and many others are still trying to make sense of Barack Obama’s defense of the following remarks.

You go into these small towns in Pennsylvania and, like a lot of small towns in the Midwest, the jobs have been gone now for 25 years and nothing’s replaced them. And they fell through the Clinton administration, and the Bush administration, and each successive administration has said that somehow these communities are gonna regenerate and they have not.

And it’s not surprising then they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy toward people who aren’t like them or anti-immigrant [sic] sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations.

(Emphasis mine.)

Says Kaus:

It lumps together things Obama wants us to think he thinks are good (religion) with things he undoubtedly thinks are bad (racism, anti-immigrant sentiment). I suppose it’s logically possible to say ‘these Pennsylvania voters are so bitter and frustrated that they cling to both good things and bad things,.” but the implication is that these are all things he thinks are unfortunate and need explaining (because, his context suggests, they prevent voters from doing the right thing and voting for … him).

Yesterday at the CNN “Compassion Forum” Obama said he wasn’t disparaging religion because he meant people “cling” to it in a good way! Would that be the same way they “cling” to “antipathy to people who aren’t like them”–the very next phrase Obama uttered? Is racism one of those “traditions that are passed on from generation to generation” that “sustains us”? Obama’s unfortunate parallelism makes it hard for him to extricate him from the charge that he was dissing rural Pennsylvanians’ excess religiosity.

If you think about it, the fact that Obama lumped the perceived religion of the white, rural Pennsylvanian with “antipathy toward those not like them”–that is, racism, bigotry and anti-immigration (sic)–makes perfect sense. The latter is bad and so is the former—if one is observing from the perspective of Black Liberation Theology.

In Obama’s mind, the religion clung to by the “average poor white Pennsylvanian” is BLT’s demonic “white” Church. The “white” Church is the tool of oppression for all—including poor whites—and should be shaken off just like other social maladies. Just like anti-immigration (sic) and racism. One will note that, in the defense of the earlier remarks, Obama still does not say anything objectively positive about the religion adhered to by the average rural white Pennsylvanian. What he actually says is that government should answer their prayers.

But what is absolutely true is that people don’t feel like they are being listened to.

And so they pray and they count on each other and they count on their families. You know this in your own lives, and what we need is a government that is actually paying attention [to their prayers!]. Government that is fighting for working people day in and day out making sure that we are trying to allow them to live out the American dream.

Never forget where this guy is coming from.

Observing the Obama-lead government action and inaction with crises which have occurred just in the last year, one can conclude that the Obama-lead government does indeed answer prayer–the prayers of America’s enemies.

I’m bitter…and clinging.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2014.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>baldilocks

imageby baldilocks

When a group of people have become guided by their bellies–their appetites–appealing to them on an intellectual, spiritual and/or altruistic basis is pointless. Not only do they become unable to discern any difference between good and evil, but they even become unable to figure out what is best for themselves.

We see this attitude made flesh–pun intended–in the latest Missouri drama involving the police.

Vonderrit Deondre Myers, a teenager who died in a police shooting, was struck by seven or eight bullets, St. Louis city Medical Examiner Dr. Michael Graham said Thursday night.

“All but one gunshot wound were to the lower extremities,” Graham said. “The one fatal wound was to the head.”

Police Chief Sam Dotson said the killing happened Wednesday evening when a suspect shot a pistol three times at the St. Louis officer, who was off-duty but wearing his uniform while moonlighting for a security company. The officer fired his pistol 17 times, police said.

The shooting sparked angry street protests, with residents pointing out similarities to the August killing of Michael Brown in nearby Ferguson.

Emphasis mine. There has also been rioting.

Many things fall under the heading of appetite. There is food, of course. (Esau famously sold his birthright to his brother Jacob–one of the earliest examples of selling oneself out against what is best for self.) And there are physical intoxicants and hallucinogens for which people will do anything to obtain.

But there are other appetites as well–tribalism, vengeance, covetousness, etc., and these are all spiritual in nature. And here’s how they operate: in the absence of the Holy Spirit, an individual–or a people–will be prone to these appetites.

Here we have black people protesting against the police because the latter responded to a shooter with identical force and, of course, the only reason they are protesting and rioting is because the shooter is black. Their appetites are more important than right and wrong. Which appetite? Their appetites for tribalism, tribal vengeance, and covetousness. Their bellies for these things have become their gods.

And many of these people won’t realize that they have food poisoning until it is too late.

Burp.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2014.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks

 

by baldilocksBaldilocks mini

So, it’s another one of those days when I’m just winging it.

This morning was a fulfilling one. I finished listening to an audio-book copy of World War Z and began listening  to a like-formatted copy of Lone Survivor–both courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library. (As an author myself, I normally buy books I’m very interested in, professional courtesy and all. But I’m just too broke for that right now.)

Isn’t it great that we can do such things so easily and cheaply now? It makes sweeping, mopping and other methods of bring order out of chaos so much easier–alleviates the boredom. And it saves so much time.

Thinking along the lines of informal education/entertainment through reading, it is frightening how many people scorn reading–it’s not just that they won’t do it themselves but they view those who do as some sort of deviant.

I had a Twitter conversation with a celebrity this morning, a person who cited Ebola as “karma” for America due to America’s “history” of “raping Africa.” (Don’t ask.) Seems concerned with “history,” right? Not so much after I reminded him–or informed him–of the Ottoman Empire’s and other Muslims sordid African history and present.

Still another interesting conversation with an  actual friend and my own brother about the spiritual contradictions of call oneself a Christian while subscribing to the demonstrably non-Christian concept of karma. They both seem to think that I’m being judgmental.

Suffice it to say that today is one of those days that I feel thankful to be living alone.

P.S. Don’t fear the Reaper.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2014.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: her new novel, her blog, her Internet–to keep them going and to the COFFEE fund to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

by baldilocks

President Obama, his puppets and his puppeteers intend to overwhelm several systems and create a pretext for the implementation of the Martial Law which has already been sanctioned. Because of the guns in private hands, a pretext is needed, something like domestic unrest. And the government and the mainstream media have been trying to gin up domestic unrest since the death of Trayvon Martin.

They keep getting close, but don’t quite get there and they try a given tactic twice.

The two latest tactics–domestic attacks by the government–are both in play right now.

One began a few months back with the invasion by illegal aliens, who were aided by the U.S. Government and the Mexican government.

We are just beginning to see the fruit of that attack.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that the Hamilton preschooler who died last week tested positive for the respiratory illness Enterovirus D-68, the N.J. Department of Health announced late Friday. […]

The 4-year-old’s death is the first in New Jersey involving the virus. Enterovirus D-68 has been found in at least four other people who have died in the United States, according to a report on CNN.

That particular tactic–inserting a diseased foreign population into the national one in order to overwhelm various American systems–didn’t work quite fast enough for the rogue US government, so it was tried again–this time with something scarier and more lethal.

Ebola.

And now half the country is in an uproar. The other half? Well, they are proof that technology cannot fix stupid.

Not that an uproar isn’t justified. It is. Our government is purposefully trying to kill us. The government executor–President Barack H. Obama–took down the barriers which were intended to protect us, and invited usurpers in. (Yes, Thomas Duncan is a usurper. He knew he had been exposed to Ebola before he boarded a plane in his native Liberia, and one wonders how he was able to afford the rather expensive flights from Monrovia to Dallas.)

But there are still people defending President Obama. And that really doesn’t matter because Barack H. Obama isn’t the cause of the catastrophes which have befallen our country. He is the effect.

We’ll see how successful these tactics are this time, as we beseech our Lord in prayer.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2014.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: her new novel, her blog, her Internet–to keep them going and to the COFFEE fund to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

 baldilocks

by baldilocks

Yes, I know that I have been saying that my new novel would be ready this year. Probably not, but I have been working on it and I just want to remind readers that it exists, still. 

******

“So, your Italian side is in effect today, I see,” said Cordelia.

“Yeah. Next week, when my black side is talking to me, Deanna and I are going to head up to the new soul food restaurant that’s by the apartment.”

“Soul food in Fullerton? That should be interesting. Make sure to bring me a plate.”

“That’s what Deanna said about this place when I said what I was doing tonight. All you two think about is food!”

“Well, that’s not all we’re thinking about,” she grinned. Continue reading “Novel Excerpt: Arlen’s Harem”

by baldilocks

By now, everyone knows that a woman was beheaded in a Moore, NolenOklahoma workplace by a Muslim–one who was terminated from that same workplace for proselytizing there. It also appears that this Muslim–Alton Alexander Nolen aka Ja’Keem Yisrael–was a repeat felon. None of his felonies were nearly as violent as the act he committed against Colleen Hufford (murdered) and Traci Johnson (critically injured). (Ms. Johnson might have been beheaded also, were it not for Mark Vaughn, who ended this particular jihad by shooting Nolen three times. This is Oklahoma we’re talking about, after all)

It’s interesting to speculate as to the spiritual path on which Nolen traveled. He was a felon, but only a small-time one. Drug felonies, mostly, and the worst thing he did before the murder was to seriously injure an OK sate trooper while resisting arrest. That, in itself, is bad enough. But the beheading is a giant leap into criminality…or, rather, a giant descent.

Roger L. Simon asks whether our prisons have become jihad factories. It is a rhetorical question, to be sure. Muslims have been actively proselytizing and gaining prison converts for decades. I’m guessing that the most famous one was Malcolm X, who converted in the late 1950s. Nolen reportedly converted to Islam a few years back during one of his stays in prison.

The Apostle Paul said that each individual is always heading in a singular direction–either to Heaven or to Hell–and that every step that each of us takes is one step toward the final destination. I submit that Nolen took one huge step toward his when he converted to Islam–an ideology which exhorts its believers to, first, invite infidels to convert, then give them a choice between converting and being beheaded.

The murder is merely a beacon as to where Nolen’s final rest might be.

I say “might” because Nolen is still breathing. Some might say, unfortunately, but because he is still breathing, their is a chance that he can make a 180-degree spiritual turn. (Just to be clear, this is not a commentary on any earthly penalties which he will likely pay.)

Along this train of thought, I began to think about Christians who minister to prisoners. I don’t know whether Christian prison ministries have a higher or lower “success rate” than do their Islamic counterparts, but I don’t think it matters. What I do think matters: that we Christians pray for and support those who go into the earthly dens of iniquity and tell the captives of sin how to get free.

And we should also pray for the captives themselves; that they will hear and heed the voice of God the Father. And that they will do so before their Enemy–and ours–leads them to a fate worse than death.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep them going and the COFFEE to keep her going!

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by baldilocks

The following text is the first part of the War Powers Resolution of 1973. The last time that I reminded readers of its existence was in 2011, when President Obama decided, without congressional authority, to pull the rug out from under Muammar Qaddafi.

PURPOSE AND POLICY

SEC. 2. (a) It is the purpose of this joint resolution to fulfill the intent of the framers of the Constitution of the United States and insure that the collective judgement of both the Congress and the President will apply to the introduction of United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicate by the circumstances, and to the continued use of such forces in hostilities or in such situations.

(b) Under article I, section 8, of the Constitution, it is specifically provided that the Congress shall have the power to make all laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution, not only its own powers but also all other powers vested by the Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.

(c) The constitutional powers of the President as Commander-in-Chief to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, are exercised only pursuant to (1) a declaration of war, (2) specific statutory authorization, or (3) a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.

There are some who dispute the constitutionality of the Act, but I don’t think it matters anymore. I don’t think that President Obama ever got the approval of Congress for the incursion in Libya and I don’t think he will bother to get one for this war in Syria–which he is pursuing with a coalition of ten nations. Interesting number, that.

What I do expect: more unchecked tyranny by the person in the Oval Office.

Also, there’s this:

17 The burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap.

2 The cities of Aroer are forsaken: they shall be for flocks, which shall lie down, and none shall make them afraid.

3 The fortress also shall cease from Ephraim, and the kingdom from Damascus, and the remnant of Syria: they shall be as the glory of the children of Israel, saith the Lord of hosts.

–Isaiah 17:1-3

It’s fairly certain that I’m not the only one who is a bit unnerved at watching baldilocksbiblical prophecy unfold before my eyes.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep them going and the COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

 

 

 

 

by baldilocks

In 2005, I wrote this is relation to C.S. Lewis’ Mere Christianity.

One of the things which occurs when one becomes a Christian is that all past sins come back up to hit one in the head like a hammer. All of the terrible stuff that you had blocked out and had no intention of ever thinking about again breaks through that mental wall behind which it was imprisoned. I call that wall the Wall of Forgetfulness and of Rationalization. Accepting Jesus Christ as your Savior bulldozes that barrier and crushes it to powder.

“Oh yes. Remember when you did that? And that? And what about that?” I was a particularly heinous person in that I did what was right for me first and foremost and to hell with who it hurt.

Have I changed? In a sense, no. My first inclination is to still do what’s right for me first and all others second (a particularly strong trait in the first-born). My second inclination, however, now is to remember what that can lead to—becoming the type of person who not only sees truth as relative, but whose method of thinking always makes her desires equivalent to what is good and real and makes the opposite true as well: what she doesn’t want becomes wrong and false.

The Bible says that Satan is the Father of Lies; these progeny include the lies that you tell yourself. And once you get into the habit of lying to yourself about yourself, it becomes almost instinctive. But when reality butts against your instinct, it interrupts the play of the little DVD of self-serving scenarios running in your head and you scream “no!” and try to turn your “truth” into reality…if you’re really far gone into self-delusion, that is.

A genuine conversion to Christianity throws cold water on all of that fantasy and shows you what you are and were on your way to becoming and points you in the opposite direction. You still fall short sometimes but you know you have broken the rules and you don’t try to cover it up or rationalize it away. Simply becoming a Christian doesn’t put Big J’s approval on everything an individual Christian does. We still sin and, if the conversion is true, we feel the sting of guilt even more keenly because we know what the rules are.

But also we know that we are incapable of sticking to the rules perfectly. And, most importantly, we know that our adherence to the rules isn’t what has saved and will save us anyway.

But what happens to the person—especially the one who calls herself a Christian—who continues to willfully take the wrong turn, who consciously makes the choices dictated by her appetites? Or her pride?

There’s a reason that one’s Christianity is referred to as a “walk of faith.” Every step of the way is still fraught with choices; “Do I take the road of faith or the road of sin?” is a question that has to be, a choice that has to be made every single day—every single moment.

Lewis is ever mindful of the fact that Christians believe in eternal life; that the soul lives forever. In one of the chapters of Mere Christianity, “Morality and Psychoanalysis,” he estimates how a person’s morality affects the soul’s composition and its eventual fate.

People often think of Christian morality as a kind of bargain in which God says, “If you keep a lot of rules I’ll reward you, and if you don’t I’ll do the other thing.” I do not think that is the best way of looking at it. I would much rather say that every time you make a choice you are turning the central part of you, the part that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, all your life long you are slowly turning this central thing either into a heavenly creature or into a hellish creature: either into a creature that is in harmony with God, and with its fellow-creatures, and with itself. To be one kind of creature is heaven: that is, it is joy and peace and knowledge and power. To be the other means madness, horror, idiocy, rage impotence and eternal loneliness. Each of us at each moment is progressing to the one state or to the other.

That explains what always used to puzzle me about Christian writers; they seem to be so very strict at one moment and so very free and easy at another. They talk about mere sins of thought as if they were immensely important: and then they talk about the most frightful murders and treacheries as if you had only got to repent and all would be forgiven. But I have come to see that they are right. What they are always thinking of is the mark which the action leaves on that tiny central self which no one sees in this life but which each of us will have to endure—or enjoy—for ever.

To me, this seems to be a particularly Catholic way of thinking–Catholics, feel free to argue–and though I have no intention of converting, it makes a lot of sense to me. If you’re going to be stuck with ‘you’ forever, it behooves you to try to become the type of person that you want to be stuck with for that long. After your threescore and ten are done (plus change, if you’re lucky/unlucky), all opportunities for modification will be past. To put it in geek-speak, in the eternal life realm, you’ll have all the features and bugs that you’re ever going to have. Apart from radical change, a person is always headed in one direction or the other; therefore the time to make changes is now.

Life is short. Well, this one is.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep them going and the COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>