Last week I saw a story about Muslims demanding prayer breaks during work

Outraged Muslims are reportedly planning a May 1 demonstration at the Amazon headquarters in Seattle, Washington.

The company is under fire after several Muslim security guards demanded time and space to pray five times a day, while on the job.

The guards contend in a lawsuit filed this week that the subcontractor who employs them does not appropriately accommodate their faith and retaliates against those who speak out..

Now I have no problem with people worshiping God as they see fit (as long as killing me and oppressing others is not a part of that worship) but it seems to me we are forgetting something that Amazon had better take into consideration before they make any deal.

It had better include us Catholics.

We pray too and if followers of Islam are given specific prayer breaks there are specific times that Catholics will need as well.

The Angelus

This is prayed three times a day 6 AM, 6 PM and Noon. It is a very short set of prayers that devout Catholics pray daily. It’s also why you hear Church bells at 6 AM, 6 PM and Noon. If Our Muslim brothers are given prayer times then Naturally we Catholics will need to pause work to pray the angelus as well.

The Divine Mercy Chaplet.

Yesterday was the feast of Divine Mercy but at 3 PM every day we are called upon to recall Christ’s Boundless mercy at the hour of his Crucifixion.

The Chaplet takes about 10-15 minutes max (I generally can pray it in 5 or less). The details of the prayer, propagated by St. Faustina and St. Pope John Paul II are here.

The Divine office:

This is a series of prayers that Priests are expected to make daily but many lay people pray it as well. There are a series of prayers and reading such people pray daily. Details here..

So Amazon while I have no problem if you choose to allow devout Muslims to worship God as they see fit on the job if these Devout Muslims are accommodated surely these devout Catholics certainly need to be accommodated as well.

Because if they’re not then obviously that would be discrimination on the basis of religion and I’m sure you at Amazon, particularly those of you in the Amazon legal department, would hate for that to be the case.

Exit Question. I don’t claim expertise on all the various protestant denominations out there but if you dear reader belong to a denomination that has a regular daily prayer routine surely you need to be accommodated as well, don’t you?


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If you are not in the position to kick in your funds we’ll always accept your prayers.

Mother Teresa will be canonized on September 4, giving formal acknowledgment of the obvious: she led a life of heroic virtue in service to others. She’s worth emulating. Her work took her around the world, and she spent time with all kinds of world leaders. In 1994, she was the main speaker at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. President and Mrs. Clinton were there. Mother Teresa’s words moved nearly everyone in the room to give her a standing ovation at one point. Remaining seated were the Clintons, who couldn’t quite work up the same enthusiasm for what they were hearing.

One wonders what will go through Hillary Clinton’s head as the canonization nudges her off the “trending” list for an hour or so. Will the event rate a remark from the presidential candidate?

Mother Teresa started out mildly enough at the prayer breakfast, with the prayer of St. Francis. “Make me an instrument of your peace…” Then she spoke about human dignity, service to the poor, aid to the dying, support for families. Who could object? But then she just had to get to the topic everyone knew she would, however much it might make her listeners squirm.

“…I feel that the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion, because it is a war against the child…I will tell you something beautiful. We are fighting abortion by adoption – by care of the mother and adoption for her baby. We have saved thousands of lives. We have sent word to the clinics, to the hospitals and police stations: ‘Please don’t destroy the child; we will take the child.’ So we always have someone tell the mothers in trouble: ‘Come, we will take care of you, we will get a home for your child.’ And we have a tremendous demand from couples who cannot have a child – but I never give a child to a couple who have done something not to have a child. Jesus said. ‘Anyone who receives a child in my name, receives me.’ By adopting a child, these couples receive Jesus but, by aborting a child, a couple refuses to receive Jesus.” [Find the full transcript at priestsforlife.org.]

Boom. That’s when the ovation began. It went on without Hillary Clinton’s participation. That much made the evening news.

Last January, Sean Fitzpatrick writing at Crisis magazine offered a postscript about the encounter between Mother Teresa and the First Lady.

“The address concluded, Mrs. Clinton noted the pointed nature of the nun’s words. ‘Mother Teresa was unerringly direct,’ the First Lady recounted. ‘She disagreed with my views on a woman’s right to choose and told me so.’ Tell her so she did; but though she was direct in her disagreement, she also offered something that Mrs. Clinton could applaud. Although Hillary Clinton was, and remains, a supporter of legalized abortion, she agreed with Mother Teresa that adoption was a preferable alternative. Speaking to her afterwards, Mother Teresa told Mrs. Clinton of her desire to continue her mission to find homes and families for orphaned, abandoned, and unwanted children by founding an adoption center in Washington, DC. She invited the First Lady to assist her in this endeavor, and brought Mrs. Clinton to India with her to witness her work firsthand.

“Mother Teresa’s motions were not wasted. When Hillary Clinton returned to Washington, she took up Mother Teresa’s request with a will. Keeping in contact with the saint who called her regularly to receive updates on her ‘center for babies,’ Hillary Clinton did the necessary legwork and succeeded in opening The Mother Teresa Home for Infant Children in 1995 in an affluent section of Washington, DC. Mother Teresa joined her for the opening, and two years later passed into the arms of her Lord. But she left a bright mark on the career of Hillary Clinton, who saw something remarkable in the tiny nun, and chose to do her bidding to help save lives. Mother Teresa inspired Mrs. Clinton to do a truly good work in spite of her dedicated promotion of Planned Parenthood’s agenda for ‘safe and legal’ abortions.

The center was quietly and unfortunately closed in 2002.”

The canonization will give Hillary Clinton an opportunity to point out Mother Teresa’s opposition to abortion, which she can contrast with her own reproductive-rights song and dance. Or, Hillary Clinton can take the high road, recall the work she and Mother Teresa did together, and say something like “let’s be more like her.”

Of course, if she doesn’t want to see more people like Mother Teresa, she could say that, too.

Ellen Kolb writes about the life issues at LeavenForTheLoaf.com. When she’s not writing, she’s hiking in New Hampshire. See her earlier posts for DaTechGuyBlog: Ethics and PP’s Campaign Cash, Putting a Know-Nothing in His Place, Ads Say the Darnedest Things, Worried About the Court? Then Worry About the Senate, and Sunday Best. 

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Today I asked for the definition of “Christianist” among other things from our friends on the left after a post at a blog called: “Joe my God”.

No answer on that one yet but perhaps the answer can best be given from another post from the same site backed up by Americablog and a group called crew urging the president to avoid the “Shadowy” national prayer breakfast.

Now this is an event that has taken place for 57 years if Wikipedia is to be believed and has hosted such dangerous “Christianist” as Bono, Elizabeth Dole, Tony Blair and that dangerous Mother Teresa she of the “dark side of faith”.

Now there is a danger of me doing the same crazy uncle business that I accused Joe my God of doing, after I’ve never heard of CREW but I HAVE heard of Americablog.

The question are this: Have we have reached a point where an event that has taken place for half a century is now shadowy? Do mainline democrats object to the national prayer breakfast or not? What mainline democrats are willing to denounce it? Is Tim Kane head of the DNC willing to denounce it?

If not, then I’m likely dealing with a group of crazy uncles myself and I should ignore them.

One important point; this event is not to be confused with the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast