Well that’s one way to get people to talk about a game whose result everyone not living in Philly believes in a foregone conclusion.

“Freedom of speech works both ways,” he said. “We respect the rights of those who choose to protest, as these rights are precisely what our members have fought — and in many cases died — for.

“But imposing corporate censorship to deny that same right to those veterans who have secured it for us all is reprehensible and totally beyond the pale.”

The NFL had this to say

In a statement, NFL Vice President of Communications Brian McCarthy said the Super Bowl game program “is designed for fans to commemorate and celebrate the game, players, teams and the Super Bowl. It’s never been a place for advertising that could be considered by some as a political statement.”

Which is ironic as at the same time they were refusing the AMVETS on NFL.com you can find this anouncement:

As part of its ongoing work to support its players, the NFL today announced a joint player and ownership commitment focused on social justice. The campaign, Let’s Listen Together, launches today and includes a multi-layered roll-out including digital content and brand spots highlighting the player-led work on social and racial equality. The platform will also include social media support, as well as individual letters from players and owners sharing their stories and personal reasons for making social justice a priority.

The program is called “let’s listen together” whose purpose is to advance so called “social justice” which is apparently to be defined by the Kaepernick wing of the NFL, because “social justice” and “listening” and the NFL’s so called commitment to “free speech” doesn’t include listening to American Vets justice for American vets or free speech for groups like the AM vets.

BTW here is the ad that they considered so divisive that they didn’t want it in a program.

Oddly enough the NBA and the NHL didn’t think the ad was all that controversial

AMVETS officials said the same #PleaseStand ad was accepted by the National Hockey League and Major League Baseball for inclusion in their all-star games’ programs. The organization sees the advertisement as an extension of their role as a “nonpartisan advocate for veterans and their families.”

The NFL is a private corporation and has the right to accept or reject any advertisement on TV or elsewhere. But the rejection of the AMVET ad highlights the paralyzing fear felt by the NFL over the anthem protests that has dramatically affected its popularity.

and here are is the AMVETS answer

Glenn Reynolds nails it:

Pete Rozelle is pretty much doing non-stop 360s in his grave at this point.

Two closing thoughts:

Thought 1:  Except for the year the Superbowl was held in the cold, it is generally a place to be for celebs to show how important they are.  I wonder how many of those woke celebs will make it a point to sit or kneel for the national anthem?  After all it’s very important to look “woke”, particularly on national TV

Thought 2:  As it is a given that this President will take advantage of this faux pas to bring back this issue how will red state Democrats answer this question without alienating either their base or the general election voters.

I can’t wait till election day.

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via ebay

Feldman: Ah yes, did you bring the um … the specimen of your um … and so on, and so on?
Martin: Yes I did. It’s in the car. [pause] There’s rather a lot.
Feldman: Good, good.
Martin: Do you really need twelve gallons?
Feldman: No, no, not really.
Martin: Do you test it?
Feldman: No.
Martin: Well, why do you want it?
Feldman: Well, we do it to make sure that you’re serious about wanting insurance

Monty Python’s Flying Circus. Royal Episode 13 1970

Last night on the way home from being the only temp who showed up for work I was listening to yet another breathless scoop about how things are falling apart in Patriots land and how the Jimmy G trade is the Patriot apocalypse

This is no surprise lately I’ve been listening to a lot of sports radio on my way to and from work and even without the new story today that’s all I’ve heard for weeks.  Brady in decline, Garoppolo the new king.  I’m rapidly reaching the limits of my patience with the people who are screaming bloody murder both over Jimmy Garoppolo success in San Francisco.

What Jimmy Garoppolo has done in his first four starts with the San Francisco 49ers after coming over via trade from the New England Patriots before the deadline is unprecedented. Quarterbacks don’t simply switch teams midseason and then light the world on fire. Through that lens, Garoppolo has no equal.

and the so called “decline” of Tom Brady.  It’s time to tackle it.

There are two basic lines of complaints, let’s tackle them in order

#1  “We should have traded Tom Brady and kept Jimmy G”!

This argument has but a single basis, but it’s a strong one. Tom Brady is a 40 year old QB and even though he is clearly the greatest QB of all time (youtube arguments not withstanding) if not the greatest football player of all time it is inevitable that either age will finally catch up with him or he will decide that he just doesn’t want to do this anymore. After all the anger over being underestimated or disrespected can only drive a person for so long.

And they do have a point here, based on this page at statisca.com they can argue that Tom Brady is playing on borrowed time since he has already played:

OVER 5 x as many seasons as the average NFL player (5.45)
OVER 4 x as many seasons as the avg QB (4.09)
3 x as many season as the avg rookie who makes an opening day Roster (2000)
OVER 2 x as many seasons as the avg player with 3 pension credited seasons (2.53)
53% longer than players with at least once pro bowl selection

and in what must be his favorite stat

Nearly TWICE as long as the average 1st round pick (1.93) next year it will be over double

On the other hand as he has already blown every single longevity stat out of the water we’ve already established that these state are meaningless when it comes to Brady.  There is no reason to believe he can’t continue for as many as two or three more years he continues to move these stats up.

However while the “Shouda traded Brady” crowd are happy to talk about those stats in terms of borrowed time, nobody is talking about how these same Stats might apply to Jimmy Garoppolo.

Garoppolo has already played longer in the NFL player than the average player (3.3 years)
Garoppolo has already played over 90% as long as the average NFL quarterback (4.4 years)
Garoppolo has already played 67% as long as the average NFL player who makes an opening day roster in their rookie season (2014) (6 yrs)
Garoppolo has already played over 56% as long as the average NFL player with 3 pension credited seasons (7.1)
Garoppolo despite being a 2nd round pick as already played over 43% as long as the average 1st round pick (9.3)

And presuming Garoppolo makes the pro-bowl next year he will have played 42% as long as the average pro-bowl player. (11.7)

So unless you think that Brady will retire after this year or the next based on current averages unless you have some kind of magic 8 ball into the future you have no reason to believe that Jimmy Garoppolo will outlast Tom Brady by enough years to make it worth while.

They further point to the last five weeks claiming and this ESPN report that this is the beginning of the end for either Belechick or Brady

Let me remind everyone that Brady in December went 4-1 over those last five game in a situation where going 3-2 would have been the difference between the 1st seed or the second seed and anything worse might have been the difference between having a 1st round bye and not, and did so at the end of a season where he’s taken a bunch of hits but the leading contender for MVP

Jimmy G’s 5-0 run while very impressive came in games where the difference between going 5-0 & 0-5 was the difference between finishing last in their division, or finishing last in their division. Before I start crying over having Tom Brady as my QB in 2018 I’d like to see Jimmy and the 49ers win some meaningful games next year against Seattle, Arizona and LA when there is something on the line for both teams.

2.  We only got a 2nd round pick.  We didn’t get proper value for him.

This argument looks at the success of Jimmy Garoppolo as he takes  an inferior team and leads it to victories not only against multiple teams better than his, but defeating playoff bound/caliber teams and it drives people crazy. This take is typical:

With a second-round pick that keeps dropping in value with every win, the 49ers essentially drafted a more polished, experienced version of any passer available in this year’s draft class. They got a a 26-year-old veteran who spent more than three years learning from arguably the best quarterback in NFL history, all the while waiting for his time to shine.

The 49ers are finally giving Garoppolo that opportunity, and the early returns suggest they may have made a franchise-altering decision that could be ushering in a new era for one of the most storied teams in league history.

It’s too early to crown Garoppolo the next Joe Montana or Steve Young, but it’s not hyperbole to say the 49ers may have already won the 2018 NFL draft by spending a Day 2 pick on a polished veteran with all the physical and mental tools to transform their fortunes seemingly overnight.

We had this guy who is obviously great and gave him away for a 2nd round pick.  How badly did we get jobbed?

This argument has three holes that I will handle from the smallest to the largest.

  1.  Yes we only got a 2nd round pick but not only will that be a higher level pick than the one that produced Jimmy G in the first place and there is no reason why a team wise enough to draft Mr. G will not be wise enough to select a QB with similar potential
  2.  It’s  a trade to a team outside our conference meaning that the Patriots will only have to face Mr. G once every four years max (or in a Superbowl) as opposed to at LEAST once every 3 years or more and have the possibility of having to go through a Jimmy G led team to make a superbowl.  It Mr. Garoppolo is as good as the critics think he is (and it’s very possible he is) then it’s  worth getting a later pick to keep Mr. Garoppolo out of our conference.
  3. Football is a sport were everyone is a single play away from being finished permanently.  Yes it’s likely that we might have gotten a 1st round pick perhaps even a top 3-5 pick for Jimmy G before game one.  But for the price of that drop of from a top 5 pick to a top 40 pick the Patriots had eight weeks of insurance if Tom Brady had to be replaced either due to injury or father time finally screaming “enough”.  If Brady had been injured in the 1st 8 weeks and Jimmy G had been traded the same fans and sportswriters screaming about how the pats got jobbed would be talking about how the Patriots threw away their Superbowl chances for 2017.

All of these are reasons why Pats fans have no business complaining about the Jimmy G trade. let me add on one more.

No Dynasty lasts forever, and even if this sensational ESPN story that nobody seems to be able to handle has any merit

As Brady and Belichick left the field, bundled up in the cold, the only thing clear was that the beginning of the end started a long time ago, masked by success and the joy and pain of the rise, leaving both men this year’s playoffs and their collective will to stave off the fall.

Your New England Patriots are two wins away from the 8th Superbowl appearance in 16 years and three wins away from their sixth superbowl victory in 17 years and enter this situation being led by not only the best Quarterback and the most experienced superbowl quarterback of all time, but with said QB being the #1 or #2 candidate for league MVP.

And you’re whining about the fact that next year you’ll be starting the Quarterback that made this possible AND have a top 40 draft pick vs one who has never played an all or nothing game with something meaningful on the line without said pick?


Closing thought. The biggest threat to turning Tom Brady numbers is him waking up one day and saying: “I’ve got nothing left to prove.” Conversely there is nothing that drives Tom Brady like disrespect from others.

I’d like to thank ESPN, WEEI and every Sports outlet for pushing this story as it is likely to not only motivate him in this years playoffs, but for 2018 and perhaps many seasons to come.

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by baldilocks

At the New York Post, Jay Cost talks about why he’s considering giving up watching the NFL; mostly about officiating and “freak” injuries.

It’s not that much of an interesting read, but it made me think about the time that I almost became one of those women.

12-year- old me to my dad: “I hate football.”

Dad: “How can you hate something you know nothing about?”

Long before I met the man who became my dad when he married my mom, Dad was a tall — 6’4″ — lanky  teenager who played football and basketball in high school and in college. He says he was better at basketball, but that he enjoyed playing football more.

Later, like almost everyone else’s dad, he’d be in front of the TV on Sundays. This was before he became a Christian and, after that, a pastor.

By the time Dad asked me that fateful question, I was beginning to parrot what I’d heard adult females say, even though I don’t remember if Mom ever gave her opinion on the game. I do know that she wasn’t watching it.

My parents had spotty success with getting me to do what they wanted using threats or shame, but they could almost always manipulate me with logic. So, when Dad asked me The Question, I was forced to conclude that he was right: that I could not come to a valid conclusion about the quality of football because I didn’t know jack about it.

To remedy this, Dad suggested that I join him in front of the TV each Sunday for one season, while he explained the goal, strategies, rules, tactics, etc. of the game, and then, afterward, make an informed opinion about the game.

By the end of that season and for many years afterward, I was a big fan of football and the NFL. Then something happened; something long before Colin Kaepernick first knelt during a rendering of the National Anthem.

I got tired of football players and their off-the-field antics. I think Rae Carruth was the death knell – in more ways than one. Kaepernick was the cremation.

Something that has always been an aversion to me is ingratitude for the blessings which God bestows, whatever the nature of that blessing: intellect, physical gifts, earthly opportunities, etc. I’ve only been able to articulate this aversion in recent years, but it has always been there as nebulous, un-evaluated disgust. And, as the character quality of NFL players seemed to descend, my interest in being entertained by them varied directly. (The same thing happened with the NBA; I stopped watching them even earlier.)

The future LA Stadium in the Rams’ and Chargers’ dreams

But now that I’ve evaluated that disgust, I do wonder how long the NFL will last, considering that I’m far from alone

in turning my back on the NFL, if all the empty stadiums and the losses incurred by ESPN, etc. are indications. Here in LA, we have two football teams that can barely sell its dirt-cheap tickets.

Back to Dad. As I said, he long ago readjusted his Sunday priorities – and so did I. It’s for the best.

One wonders what an NFL-less America would look like.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

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The best way to descrive the effect of the tax cut bill that just passed will have on our already improving economy is to think of it as the difference between Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger and New England Patriots Quarterback Tom Brady.

By any standard Ben Roethlisberger is a great quarterback. His stats are impressive. He has thrown for over 4000 yards five times, has thrown 25 or more touchdowns a season seven times, had seasons with a QB rating over 100 three times, thrown less than 10 interceptions a season 4 times. Counting this season He has led the Steelers to ten playoff appearances, seven division titles and two Super Bowls both wins.

Any competent list of elite NFL quarterbacks over the last decade includes him and in different era a credible case could be made for listing him as said era’s top Quarterback.

But unfortunately for Big Ben this isn’t another era. It’s the Tom Brady era and as excellent as Roethlisberger’s stats are they pale before Brady’s. Tom has thrown for 4000 or more yards 9 times (over 5000 in 2011) He has thrown 25 or more touchdowns 13 times (including 50 in 2007) , ha seasons with a QB rating over 100 6 times (three seasons over 110), thrown less than 10 interceptions a season 7 times (only 2 last year)

And of course counting this season Tom Brady has led the Patriots to the Division every single year (15 seasons years) but one (2002) and has taken his team to the Superbowl seven times winning five.

Or to put it another way. While Ben Roethlisberger is a great quarterback, a Hall of Fame Quarterback, a quarterback any team would be proud to have, he is not even in the same league as Tom Brady who is the greatest and most successful Quarterback to ever play the game.

What does that have to do with the Trump Tax plan? Just this.

The Obama Economy was, put simply a disaster:

The latest numbers mean that Obama’s economic forecasters missed their growth targets every year that he was in office. And, once again, economists who had been promising that strong growth was just around the corner — most recently because of a relatively strong third quarter — had to eat crow.

It also means that GDP growth has not exceeded 3% for 11 straight years. . . .

And despite th predictions of naysayers and experts galore:

Jason Furman, who chaired the Council of Economic Advisers under President Barack Obama, told reporters earlier this year that the chances of reaching 3 percent growth over a decade were about 1 in 25 — which is what many political experts said was Trump’s chance of winning the election. Another Obama economist, Alan Krueger, called the 3 percent growth forecast “extremely rosy.”

Larry Summers, a top economic adviser to Obama, questioned the “standards of integrity” of the Trump economic team’s forecast for 3 percent (or more) growth. “I do not see how any examination of U.S. history could possibly support the Trump forecast as a reasonable expectation,” he wrote in The Washington Post.

It took Donald Trump less than one year to change this achieving the 3% economic growth that others have said was not possible

President Donald Trump’s goal of 3 percent growth has been realized in two of the three quarters since he took office, and economists say the trend can keep going for at least another quarter and possibly longer.

Third-quarter GDP grew by 3 percent, well above the 2.5 percent expected by economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters and below the 2.8 percent in the CNBC/Moody’s Rapid Update. The third-quarter number comes on top of 3.1 percent growth in the second quarter, making for the best back-to-back quarters since 2014 and ending a long streak of sluggish 2 percent growth.

To put it one way. Trump’s first year Economic numbers are something to be proud of, particularly compared to Obama’s. Clearly above average and heading in the right direction. They are the Ben Roethlisberger of economic stats.

Now take that above average economy and add to it a tax plan that cuts corporate tax rates from 35% to 21% while cutting taxes on a resurgent middle class a package that produced this reactions from Germans:

“The tax competition will have a new dimension,” said Christoph Spengel, chairman of the corporate tax department at the University of Mannheim. Mr. Spengel, who is also a research associate at the Center for European Economic Research, and a group of tax experts at the university have done a detailed comparison of the two countries’ tax systems and published a report under the heading, “Germany loses out in US tax reform.”

Clemens Fuest, who heads the Ifo economic think tank, also said he believed German business would suffer. “Investments and jobs will migrate to the US,” he said.

Once the full effect of this tax bill hits we will go from a Roethlisberger economy to a Brady economy and leave that solid 3% growth in the dust.

Get ready folks, golden days are ahead.

Forgetting the kneeling and other things the end of yesterday Steelers / Patriots game is everything that’s wrong with the NFL.

I only had a chance to listen to a little bit of the Patriots / Steelers game on my 1st break but had to go turn it off just after the pats kicked their 4th quarter field goal to come within five but as several residents at the nursing home where my wife works she was able to catch bits and pieces of it.

She was taking care of a patient when Big Ben threw to James and heard the call of “Touchdown” and the first replay but as she was doing her job didn’t have time to stay beyond that.

About 30 minutes later she was taking care of another patient who was saying how the Patriots won. She told him that she had seen the Steelers score a touchdown with a few seconds left. The resident told her, no the Patriots won and my wife didn’t argue figuring he was having a moment and didn’t find out otherwise till much later.

Now I know that according to the rules the reversal was valid and this lousy call doesn’t remove Ben’s responsibility for a really bad decision in trying to force that ball on the next to last play rather than throwing it way and shooting for overtime but let’s cut to the chase.

If what the NFL rules consider a “catch” is different that what a normal person who doesn’t follow the game thinks a catch is, the problem is not with the normal person, but with the rule.

At least that’s what I think.

While driving down Route 55 in Lagrangeville, New York (about 60 miles north of New York City) on the way to a medical appointment yesterday, I spotted a sign outside of Kelly’s Steaks and Spirits that sure lifted mine! The sign announced that they DO NOT air NFL games in that establishment and the sign further went on to say:


If I were not driving at the time I would have taken a picture.  I do not have the resources to go out for dinner, but that sign alone (in NEW YORK) is enough reason for me to want to check that place out if the opportunity to dine out should ever present itself to me. Predictably, the Trump Derangement Syndrome afflicting people has caused an outbreak of hatred and poor reviews for this establishment.  At the top of their page, Facebook highlights certain words they think we need to know people are using:


MJ Stevenson, AKA Zilla, is best known on the web as Zilla at MareZilla.com. She lives in a woodland shack near a creek, in one of those rural parts of New York State that nobody knows or cares about, with her family and a large pack of guardian companion animals. 

There have been a lot of snark from a lot of Pizza companies about Papa John’s statement concerning the NFL protests hurting their sales.

Pizza Hut has bragged that their sales are up , Digiorno’s frozen pizza has been trolling them and plenty of people on twitter have followed suit, but if you look at all the tweets and the words you’ll not there is one thing that they have NOT done.

They have not taken a position on the NFL Protests

They have not moved to become an official sponsor of the NFL

Now if their premise is correct and that Papa John’s stock/sales slump is just about the pizza and not about their association with the NFL, and if all those who insist that the NFL, with it’s still high rating compared to everyone but their own past ratings, are a great deal than if Papa John’s decides to drop the NFL as this article suggests they might;

Papa John’s is reconsidering its sponsorship of the NFL amid declining ratings, the pizza chain confirmed to CNBC.

Papa John’s executives told The Wall Street Journal that top executives discuss returns on their advertising dollars with the NFL weekly and will see what happens for the rest of the season before making a decision. Additionally, Papa John’s is completely rethinking its advertising strategy as consumers cut the cord and move to digital.

…then naturally these pizza companies should be rushing to jump on board. After all the NFL even with their now lower rating are a valuable property and if association with the NFL has nothing to do with Papa John’s sales drop then these guys should be absolutely delighted to be the official pizza of the NFL. In fact DiGiorno doesn’t even have to wait, they can become the official frozen pizza of the NFL.

But for some inexplicable reason they have not. Maybe this is a clue:

Marketers have put NBCUniversal on notice: Stop covering NFL players’ national-anthem protests, or we’ll pull our ads.
That’s according to Linda Yaccarino, the chairman of advertising sales at NBCUniversal, who spoke during a keynote interview at an event held Friday in New York at the ad agency RGA.

or perhaps this:

While the overall stock market is up since the start of the football season, shares of the league’s broadcasters–CBS, Twenty-First Century Fox, Walt Disney (ESPN) are down. High-profile sponsors like Papa John’s (long synonymous with the NFL due largely to former Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning‘s status as a spokesperson and franchisee for the company), Anheuser-Busch InBev (Budweiser is paying $1.4 billion to be the league’s official beer sponsor through 2022)–whose shares were outpacing the market during the three-month period to the kickoff of the NFL season–have been under-performers.

For example Under Armor which put out a statement at the time of the protests saying:

“stands for the flag and by our Athletes for free speech, expression and a unified America.”

saw its stock price go down from $20.02 at the close of trading on July 31st to $11.61 on November 3rd.

So to all those claiming that Papa John’s is making excuses about dropping sales I ask this:

Can anyone explain if the NFL protests are not hurting ratings or advertising why the NFL and their advertisers are not part of the Trump stock boom?

For all their bravado hitting Papa Johns they know that to get involved in the NFL right now and to embrace the protests would hurt them far more than the NFL has hurt Papa John’s. They at least have the excuse of already being there before the protests started, any new advertiser would be jumping in after said protests implying support and no amount of folks on twitter saying otherwise will change it.

As I have no sexual secrets of rich liberals to sell or the sponsorship of a national pizza company I have to make my buck by going places and doing interviews all the time hoping people like it enough to pay for it.

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For weeks our friends in media, particularly in the sports media have been doing all they can to make sure that the entire world knows that whatever is the cause of the drop in ratings for the NFL and the empty seats it definitely , positively and just plain isn’t mostly connected to the players protesting during the national anthem.

We see story after story saying it’s over saturation, it’s the quality of play, it’s the injuries, it’s everything ANYTHING but the elephant in the room, the protests during the National Anthem that while it plays well with the radical left, and the players who support the radical left and the media that supports the radical left and the sports media that is even more radical than the regular media but is detested by the actual customer base of the NFL.

Well lo and behold Papa John’s Pizza which is a brand completely identified with the NFL has had a meeting and Papa John himself had decided to bluntly tell the world that the NFL emperor doesn’t have any clothes

In a teleconference Wednesday, company founder and CEO John Schnatter criticized how the league has handled the player protests and it’s impact on the company.

“The NFL has hurt us,” Schnatter said (via ESPN). “We are disappointed the NFL and its leadership did not resolve this.”

Papa John’s is the official pizza of the NFL, with scheduled commercial time slots during games. The NFL has promised Papa John’s additional slots for next year, but Schnatter still isn’t happy.

“Leadership starts at the top and this is an example of poor leadership,” Schnatter said, adding the issue should have “nipped in the bud” early in last year’s season.

They are being attacked merciless for telling the truth

After Schnatter directed his comments at the league’s leadership, the company quickly began trending on Twitter on Wednesday. Users accused him of blaming the players protesting racial inequality—and missed no opportunity to take jabs at their quality of pizza.

This spin is very funny but the funniest spin came from Pizza Hut

According to Business Insider, Yum Brands CEO Greg Creed told investors that Pizza Hut hasn’t seen the impact from NFL player protests that Papa John’s claimed to be damaging their business. Creed said:

“We’re not seeing any impact from any of that.”

While Papa John’s is recognized as the “official” pizza of the NFL, brands like Pizza Hut and Dominos rely considerably on NFL fans for their game-day sales.

The problem with this argument is an important contrast first Papa Johns:

Papa John’s, the official pizza company of the NFL, has a deal with the league and with 23 teams.

In other words Papa John’s is directly associated with the NFL in many people minds particularly those who buy Pizza. How about Pizza Hut? (emphasis mine)

According to CNBC, Pizza Hut, who has no affiliation with the NFL, saw 1 percent growth this quarter, higher than expected. “We’re not seeing any impact from any of that on our business,” the company said during an earnings conference call, according to CNBC

So let me get this straight, the evidence that the press is presenting that Papa John’s, a company totally associated with the NFL is wrong that the protests in the NFL that they are associated with are hurting them is that a similar company WITH NO AFFILIATION WITH THE NFL IS NOT HAVING THAT PROBLEM?

Am I the only person in the world who sees how absolutely insane that argument is?

By an odd coincidence that likely has nothing to do with what Papa John’s has said and it’s effect on other advertisers who might have noticed the same thing but said nothing the NFL put his ad on youtube today and played it during Thursday night football last night:

I’m sure that it’s just a coincidence that this ad started running right after the Papa John’s business and furthermore I’m sure the fact that at the restaurant I was at when it ran the person next to me said they didn’t believe them is simply anecdotal.

As I have no sexual secrets of rich liberals to sell or the sponsorship of a national pizza company I have to make my buck by going places and doing interviews all the time hoping people like it enough to pay for it.

If you like the idea of new media on the scene at for these time of things and want to support independent journalism please hit DaTipJar below.

Please consider subscribing, Not only does that get you my weekly podcast emailed to you before it appears either on the site or at the 405media which graciously carries it on a weekly basis but if you subscribe at any level I will send you an autographed copy of my new book from Imholt Press: Hail Mary the Perfect Protestant (and Catholic) Prayer

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Good Afternoon.

I’d like to address the controversy about remarks made by me at the owners meeting in New York two weeks ago.

As all of you know the phrase I used has been in common parlance for decades and until I used it there had never been an issue with its usage before, but it’s my understanding that some of my players have taken offense to it as if I was implying that they were the equivalent of prison inmates.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  If we didn’t respect our players as both football players and as men they would not be on our roster.

However there are players who are angry and outraged and feel that their humanity and manhood has been insulted.  Well, far be it from me to question someone’s feelings.  If some of our players think their honor has been violated by me I certainly don’t want to put them in a position where they feel uncomfortable at their workplace so, in that spirit I’d like to make this announcement.

Any player who can not in good conscience continue to play for a team owned by me can report to my office in the next 36 hours and I will release them from their contract at once, allowing them to pursue employment with any other team or in any other field that is consistent with their honor and manhood.  This is a risky move for our team, I know we might lose some key men and it will likely take some time to get any replacement sup to par, but I’d rather have a man happy to be here then to put a fellow in a position where he doesn’t want to be.  So if any player choose to depart we shall wish them well and hope for their success in any future endeavors.

However having offered this out for players who are dissatisfied, this organization will expect any player who chooses to remain to dedicate himself to the game and not let themselves be distracted from doing the job they have decided to remain at, and to deal with any issues they have, either with this organization or with society as a whole, off the field.

Thank you


One more point concerning the NFL protests.

The NFL players might be OK with a less profitable league and a contract that might be smaller right now when they are making six and seven figures but they are forgetting something.

The avg NFL players career is 3.3 years, for a pro-bowl caliber player that shoots up to 11.7. This is the time of maximum earnings for these players, not only from playing but from endorsements and appearances.

Now a very smart player might put money aside for when the big checks stop coming but if they do not they will find that the taxes and the mortgages on those million dollar properties don’t stop when the NFL checks do. So they need to be marketable if they want to keep up that lifestyle.

How marketable do you think NFL players are now that the league is identified with protesting against the flag and police? If you have a national brand or even a local one do you want to take a chance on identifying your brand with this type of thing?

And while the most visible protesters will certainly be affected even the avg player who didn’t take a knee is going to suddenly discover that the tag “ex-NFL player” will no longer open financial doors like it used to.

NFL players, thanks to your protests you have sacked the financial future of every guy in the league not named Brady or of that caliber and you’ve done it for decades to come. And when you find yourself in financial trouble you will have the unpleasant realization that you as a group did this to yourselves and to every college player that follows you.