It’s a good thing that Nick Foles’ Christian faith doesn’t prevent him from playing football on a Sunday, particularly last Sunday.

The MVP and Super Bowl champion has never shied away from his belief in God.

His Twitter bio reads: “Believer in Jesus Christ, husband, father, son, brother.”

More than a few sports reporters cringed when Foles held his postgame news conference after the Super Bowl. “I wouldn’t be out here without God, without Jesus in my life. I can tell you that, first and foremost in my life, I don’t have the strength to come out here and play a game like that,” he said.

Few Eagles fans and even fewer journalists expected that Foles could bring Philadelphia a single victory in the playoffs, let alone a Super Bowl victory.

But his unbelievable performance in the big game is a continuing saga of perseverance. Foles almost quit football after a crisis of confidence over his future when he fell from a superb year in 2013 with the Eagles to a backup role with the Los Angeles Rams.

But his belief in God continued to pull him through. “It took a lot more faith to come back and play than it would’ve to go in the other direction,” Foles told The Associated Press. “Either way would’ve been fine. Either way, I would’ve trusted in God. I would’ve done something else and glorified God in that instance. I knew as a person that the more growth I’ve had and the more opportunity I would have to glorify God and trust in him would be to go back and play football.”

Foles said he wants to become a pastor once his playing career is over–a career that looks a lot brighter than it did only two months ago when he took over as quarterback when Carson Wentz suffered a knee injury.

The Eagles quarterback is a graduate student at Liberty University where he studies religion. In fact, the school, which preacher Jerry Falwell founded, turned on the Rawlings School of Divinity in Eagle midnight green to honor Foles.

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It’s worth noting that Wentz, the quarterback Foles replaced after an injury, is a devout Christian. Even offensive coordinator Frank Reich is an ordained Presbyterian minister.

According to FaithWire, the Eagles even conducted a baptism in a hotel pool. “A photo posted to Twitter shows wide receiver Marcus Johnson being baptized in a hotel pool while surrounded by his teammates,” the site reports, calling the Eagles “possibly be the most spiritually active NFL team around.”

Foles was among that group, as was Wentz. ESPN has also chronicled the team’s devotion to religion, indicating that players hold Bible studies. “The presence of faith is not unique to the Eagles, though the way in which it has manifested might be,” reported ESPN.

Maybe the Eagles did have God in their corner. Foles and some of his fellow Christians helped answer the prayers of downtrodden Eagles fans who suffered through a nearly six-decade championship drought. Thanks, Saint Nick!

Like almost everything, the Super Bowl has become as much a political event as a game.

DaTimes’ Frank Bruni, one of the most leftist columnists at the newspaper, has written an incredibly obnoxious analysis of The Big Game. The headline itself is a neck-snapper: “The Existential Hell of This Year’s Super Bowl.”

“Football, like Trumpism, likes to believe that it’s about working-class folks in the heartland. But this year’s Super Bowl, like the Trump administration, bows to the Acela corridor. It nearly brought together two teams from underexposed cities, Jacksonville and Minneapolis. Instead it brings together two teams from celebrated theaters of history in the Northeast. So much for the little guy,” Bruni opines.

This comes from someone who is so much a part of the Acela corridor that he can’t even see how effete his analysis is anymore. His main claim to fame is that he is the first openly gay columnist for DaTimes.

But there’s more from Bruni.

“During the 2016 campaign, the Patriots’ owner, Robert Kraft, attested to Trump’s fine character, while the Patriots’ coach, Bill Belichick, wrote privately to Trump to congratulate him for his perseverance, telling him, ‘Your leadership is amazing.’”

Failing in his politically correct assessment, Bruni then just gets nasty. “[W]hen he looks at the Patriots’ glamour-puss quarterback, Tom Brady, he sees a younger, less quizzically coifed version of himself, complete with a foreign-born model for a wife. Trust me on this. He just squints extra hard, sucks in his gut and begs Melania to answer to ‘Gisele’ for a while.”

As a resident of Philadelphia, I would like to see the Eagles win. The city has been starved for a champion since the Phils’ 2008 World Series victory. Villanova is in the suburbs so its national basketball championship doesn’t really count in the city.

Moreover, if the Eagles win, sports writers will be flummoxed again by quarterback Nick Foles praising God after a victory.

Nevertheless, the Eagles have a significantly high number of protestors during the national anthem. One of the team’s most prominent members, Malcolm Jenkins, pushed a policy for “emotional training” for cops, and the Philadelphia police have complained and the players’ sentiments. See https://www.cnsnews.com/blog/craig-bannister/nfl-network-air-eagles-players-call-emotional-intelligence-training-police

Even though my Philadelphia friends may disown me, I could live with a New England win, particularly since it would be politically incorrect among the “intellectual” elite.

Simply put, it’s a win-win for me in this existential hell! Sorry, Frank.