The Current dispute between Poland and Israel over the history of the Nazi Occupation of Poland during World War two is one of the most foolish things I’ve seen two countries do in a long time.

It not only serves the purpose of their common enemies, of which there are many, to foment trouble between common friends made to take sides but clouds a fact so obvious that it’s almost embarrassing to have to say it:

Poland and Israel are natural allies.

Think about how many things Poland & Israel have in common:

Both Poland and Israel are dealing with a left that berates them for defending their boarders.
Both Poland and Israel have forcibly made stands against Islamic Terror
Both Poland and Israel are threatened  by Russian Allies
Both Poland and Israel and have been invaded by either the Russians or their allies during their countries lives.
Both Poland and Israel have found themselves in longshot wars against multiple enemies in the last century.
Both Poland and Israel have minorities (Russian & Arab) within their borders that are natural allies of their enemies.
Both Poland and Israel have historically had their countries overrun conquered, and wiped off the map and know what is to lose their homeland

Finally

Both Poland and Israel are strongly pro-america, strong allies and part of United States Defensive Planning.

That’s why this dispute over history is not only dangerous but plays right into the hands of those who today, not 30, or 50 or 75 years ago directly threaten both Poland and Israel.

No country likes to be the subject of mendacity and to state that the Polish State was complicit in the Holocaust, when it was overrun by BOTH the Nazi’s and the Soviets in WW2 and  furthermore was subject of an armed occupation that didn’t end until 1992 (a full 44 years after the state of Israel was established) is not only the height of absurdity but a legitimate insult. Israel who has been the subject of international blood libels can appreciate that

At the same time to deny that, like in every country that the Nazi’s occupied, there were Polish collaborators both willing and unwilling who aided Nazi attempts to exterminate the Jewish race, or to deny any existence of antisemitism, either current or past, on the part of Polish nationals is also hogwash. Pols who had to deal with 40 years of occupation as a Russian satellite and force fed propaganda in an attempt to whitewash their history can appreciate that.

Now I’m a free speech guy and I think Poland is making a mistake with this law targeting speech, even libelous speech against their government. It’s much too easy for such a law to be abused, further if you can ban one type of speech you can ban another. If a person chooses to make an ass of himself by saying outrageous things I say let that person freely do so and let others freely call out such people for the liars and asses they are. This is something Israel has to deal with all the time.

So in the interest in uniting these national allies, both of whom I admire, may I humbly suggest the following joined declaration by the Polish and the Jewish states:

We the states of Israel and Poland Jointly Affirm the Following:

That both Jewish people and Polish people were victims of the 2nd World War

That the Polish State bears no responsibility for the atrocities of the Holocaust and any attempt to declare it so is a base lie

That any attempt to deny the Holocaust, or to deny that some individuals from occupied countries, including Poland, collaborated with Nazi attempts to destroy European Jewry is also a base lie.

That the scourge of antisemitism, both in the past and its current resurgence, both in the Arab world and within Europe particularly among Islamic migrants  is an international disgrace.

Poland and Israel both not only condemn antisemitism but commit themselves  as nations to opposing its spread.

The states of Poland and Israel both have the right to exist, secure within their own borders and have the right and obligation to protect and secure those boarders for the sake of their people.

That Israel commits itself to the protection of and the free access to sites in the Holy Land that are considered sacred not only to the Polish People but to Christians worldwide moved by the love of God and the desire to serve him.

That Poland commits itself to the protection of and the free access to sites in Poland that are considered sacred not only to Jews but to those worldwide who wish preserve the memory of those who the Nazis attempted to exterminate and to unite in the cry of “Never Again!”

Finally both Poland and Israel both affirm their commitment to fight the war against international terrorism and, when possible cooperate to bring the scourges of ISIS and Al Qaeda and all terrorist who would target the innocent to their knees.

I can think of no better way to not only defuse this crisis but to send a message to Poland’s and Israel’s common enemies that while like all friends there might be occasional disagreements between the two, they will stand united against the common enemies seeking to bring them both down.


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Remember the series of wistful articles the New York Times ran in 2008 to mark the 75th anniversary of the birth of Adolf Hitler’s Thousand Year Reich?

Me neither — because, of course, it never happened. But that’s not as crazy as it sounds considering the Times is running a series of stories under the banner of “Red Century” to mark the centennial of the Bolshevik Revolution.

In case you’ve forgotten, the advent of Soviet rule in Russia ushered in an age of Communist terror whose death tally makes Nazism’s toll almost inconsequential in comparison. But that hasn’t stopped the Times from publishing reverential pieces written by the progeny of Reds who were active at home and abroad.

I have limited toleration for sanctimonious crap, so I rarely click on a link to a Times story. Still, I’ve skimmed a couple of the Red Banner features just to see how much Commie propaganda the paper will allow.

Then I stumbled on one story that I had to read all the way through: ‘s “My Grandfather, the Secret Policeman,” which was published July 31. www.nytimes.com/2017/07/31/opinion/communism-policeman-jews-nazis.html  , a journalist whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, L.A. Review of Books and online, recounts the adventures of his Polish grandfather, Jakub, during and after World War II.

Himself the son of a Communist, Jakub established a name for himself as an anti-Nazi partisan during the war before joining the Polish secret police in 1945. Jakub was clearly a brave and clever man, and recounts his tale dispassionately. But while he doesn’t come out and praise Jakub’s cause, neither does he condemn it.

At the story’s end, seems to grapple with the realization that he hasn’t come to terms with his grandfather’s role in the grand scheme of history — nor given a full account of it.

“What does it mean to fight on the right side of the war, but the wrong side of history?” he writes.

“Depending on whom you ask today, my grandfather’s story is that of a partisan, a traitor, a hero or a spy. The revolution asked a terrible amount of those who served it. Those who resisted paid a similarly awful price. It left in its wake countless lives, like my grandfather’s, that cannot be compassed by a single line.”

Such a statement doesn’t make up for the many facts omitted from his story, starting with the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact signed on Aug. 23, 1939, which directly led to Hitler’s invasion of Poland on Sept. 1. A secret protocol of the treaty called for the partition of Poland, with Germany getting the western portion and the Soviets the east. The Soviets invaded on Sept. 17 to grab their half of the spoils.

Also left out is what happened to Poland in the roughly 21 months of Soviet rule. Hundreds of thousands of Poles were deported to Kazakhstan, Siberia and other points east during the occupation. Even worse, more than 22,000 military officers, politicians, professors, priests and other civic leaders were executed in what is collectively known as the Katyn Forest massacres.

writes that the Nazis in 1939 captured his grandfather, then a Polish soldier, but he escaped and made his way to Minsk, the capital of Belarus. Curiously, he doesn’t explain why Jakub didn’t halt his flight in Soviet-occupied Poland instead of going hundreds of miles to the east. Maybe didn’t want to bring up all that awkward partition business and Nazi-Soviet hanky panky.

So says it depends on your perspective whether Jakub, a Soviet pawn, was “a partisan, a traitor, a hero or a spy.” Let me tell you about a couple of Poles whom I consider nothing but heroes.

My Dziadzia (grandfather) was barely out of boyhood when he came to America shortly after the turn of the 20th century. After World War I broke out, he attended a rally in Toronto featuring General Józef Haller, who called on Polish emigres to return to Europe and free their homeland. Stirred by emotion, Dziadzia signed up to join the Polish Legions on the spot.

From 1916 to 1918, Dziadzia fought against the Germans in France. The Polish Legions’ efforts alone may not have restored Poland as an independent country, but they played a part. Having done his job, Dziadzia returned to the United States and raised a family. He sent four sons, including my dad, to fight against Germany and Japan in World War II.

Meanwhile, the family he had left behind in eastern Poland didn’t fare as well as my and

I wish I could offer as many details about my grandfather as provides about his, but died when I was 4. All I recall are his smiles and kindness. While he passed on some stories to my dad, he didn’t like talking much about his cousins because it was too painful.

You could take the stories of my family and multiply them by thousands to get an idea of what happened in Poland during World War II. It’s too bad the New York Times will never run that story.

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By Steve Eggleston

In an interview with the Associated Press, former Polish President Lech Walesa said of the world and the American role in it, “(T)he world is disorganized and the superpower is not taking the lead. I am displeased.” Walesa, who led the Solidarity movement that led to the end of Communism in Poland, knows a thing or two about leadership. After all, unlike the “peaceful transition” the AP article insinuates, his Solidarity movement was brutally repressed by the Polish Communist leaders in the early 1980s.

Now, why would Walesa say the US is not taking the lead? Among the many reasons, there are several just related to Poland. One of President Barack Obama’s first foreign policy actions was to cancel a European missile shield that would have been based in Poland at the insistence of Russia. Never mind that Russia is prohibited by treaty from having missiles that target Europe, and that the shield was designed more for protection from missiles launched from Iran.

Obama’s promise of more flexibility vis a vis Russia in his second term is rather disturbing to Poland. Going back through history, not only did the former Soviet Union dominate a nominally-independent Poland after it (re)seized eastern Poland following World War II, but before World War I, it directly ruled Poland as a part of the Russian Empire.

Obama’s and Secretary of State John Kerry’s rudderless reaction to Russia’s seizure of the Crimea peninsula and designs on other parts of Ukraine bear that out. Like Poland, Ukraine was forcibly annexed into the pre-World War I Russian Empire, and Russian President Vladmir Putin has expressed a desire to recreate that version of Russia.

One more thing – the AP story notes that Obama didn’t meet with Walesa on his previous trip to Poland. Something tells me that, even though the purpose of the June trip is to mark the 25th anniversary of Poland’s emergence from Communism, Obama will duck Walesa again.

by baldilocks

Only soft-handed Marxists natter on about the “right” or “wrong side of history.” Countries like Poland, however, have been battered by real Marxism and proceed accordingly.

NATO allies will hold emergency talks on the crisis in Ukraine on Tuesday, for the second time in three days, following a request from Poland, the alliance said on Monday.

In calling the meeting, Poland, a neighbor of Ukraine, invoked a NATO rule allowing any ally to consult with the others if it feels its security, territorial integrity or independence are under threat, the so-called Article 4.

“The developments in and around Ukraine are seen to constitute a threat to neighboring Allied countries and having direct and serious implications for the security and stability of the Euro-Atlantic area,” the alliance said in a statement.

Emphasis mine; Poland knows Russia well.

There’s the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, under which Hitler’s Nazi Germany and Stalin’s USSR agreed to split up Poland.[i]

There’s the Katyn Massacre. Originally attributed to the Nazis, it was actually perpetrated by the NKVD (Soviet Secret Police); the USSR admitted to the massacre in 1990.

And there’s the Warsaw Pact. Allegedly it was formed counter as counter to NATO and as a “Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance” between the USSR and eight other eastern European countries, including Poland. But, as is well-known,  it was de facto enslavement of those countries by Soviet masters.

But Poland doesn’t even have to look to the previous century find reasons to be suspicious of Russia and its goals.

Recall the scrapped agreement for the missile shield technology  for Poland and the Czech Republic. It had been promised by George W. Bush, opposed by Vladimir Putin, and, in the end, was reneged on by Barack H. Obama.  And recall that the turnabout was announced on September 18, 2009—the seventieth anniversary of the day on which Hitler and Stalin carried out their designs on Poland.

And let’s not forget what happened to the Polish leadership in 2010.

Polish President Lech Kaczynski and some of the country’s highest military and civilian leaders died on Saturday when the presidential plane crashed as it came in for a landing in thick fog in western Russia, killing 96, officials said.

(…)

Russian and Polish officials said there were no survivors on the 26-year-old Tupolev, which was taking the president, his wife and staff to events marking the 70th anniversary of the [Katyn] massacre of thousands of Polish officers by Soviet secret police.

This grimly ironic accident is still being questioned.

Our leadership and many other observers may not be taking into account—or even be familiar with—the history of this abusive relationship, but it would be safe to bet that the Poles had it in mind when they decided to make their appeal to NATO.

This is not to say that the United States should intervene on behalf of Ukraine. Even if our mandate to do so were morally and politically clear-cut, in the wake of the hollowing out of this nation–militarily, economically, socially, and, most importantly, in the leadership sphere–we are simply not able to help Ukraine or any other nation.

But while the President of the United States continually provides negative examples of an observation made by King Solomon in Proverbs, Poland looks at Ukraine, scrutinizes its own history and soberly ponders reality. Please, God, let there be a few more sober realists in the USA!

Stay tuned.

UPDATE: Lithuania invokes Article 4 as well.


[i] In his actions concerning Georgia and Ukraine, Russian president Vladimir Putin has borrowed a strategy from both Stalin and Hitler: both claimed that their attack on Poland was to protect ethnic Ukrainians, Belarusians and Germans in the country—a pretext, to be sure.

Putin used a similar justification, with respect to ethnic Russians living in the Republic of Georgia, for the Russo-Georgian War of 2008, which resulted in the “independence” of formerly Georgian provinces Abkhazia and South Ossetia. Both provinces “had been functioning for 15 years outside Georgian control, their de facto independence guaranteed by Russian peacekeeping troops.” Putin is using this same strategy at present as justification for Russia’s incursion into Ukraine–an old form of ethnic cleansing.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in early 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

Poland #1 via commentator gazzer from the Daily Telegraph

Poland to enforce chemical castration of paedophiles

Poland #2

Oscar-winning director Andrzej Wajda and other Polish filmmakers appealed Monday to U.S. and Swiss authorities to free Roman Polanski, decrying his arrest as a “provocation.”

Their appeal came as the Polish and French governments wrote to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and called up Swiss Foreign Minister Micheline Calmy-Rey about the case.

The fact that this is even debated illustrates the culture wars more than anything else I can think of.

Quick question: On the Morning shows the reporters seem to be beating their breasts over this. What do you think Sarah Palin would say on it? Would she even have to think 10 seconds?