Last week large amounts of the student bodies of Claremont and UCLA colleges turned out to protest Heather MacDonald insisting that Black lives matter to them and not to the police.  Thanks to a spate of Easter violence that assertion can be tested by the answers to two questions

When will Claremont & UCLA be holding mass protests over this:

The fatal shooting of Tywan Anderson, 23, in the 1300 block of South Fairfield Avenue, half a block north of Mount Sinai Hospital, marked the only fatality among 29 people who were shot from Saturday to Sunday morning, officials said. Of the people shot, three were teenagers — ages 14, 15 and 17.

and this:

Police are hunting a killer who shared a video of the moment he shot dead an innocent man in Cleveland and claims to have slaughtered 14 more.

Steve Stephens, 37, is on the loose in the Ohio city after he filmed the murder and posted it on social media at around 2pm Eastern Time on Easter Sunday.

If as you say you are angry about violence against black citizens then surely you will be protesting the perpetrators of this actual violence that has taken place in the last 48 hours targeting the black community.  With the same social media network you used to protest Heather Mac Donald you would be able to get something up and running in days with the same kind of crowds.

That is, if you are so inclined.  If you’re not, why not?

Second Question:

What will Claremont and UCLA do for the families of the dead and wounded in the black community?

Are you committing any time and effort to protect these survivors or to find the those responsible for their deaths, or even help them cope with their losses? And if you aren’t AND the police are, then what does that say about who is more committed to black lives?

Now both of these things I mentioned are completely within your power and if you are the people of high moral authority that you claim to be you could have both a protest and perhaps even a fund that the victims and their families could tap to cover their incidental expenses, in fact I’ll be both colleges would be happy to coordinate the making of such a fund if you ask them.

But be aware, you will find no political advantage to it, there is nothing in these killings or shooting that will allow you to make political hay against Police, Donald Trump, Heather MacDonald or anyone else on the right.

So the challenge is there, it’s time to show the world, DO you students of UCLA and Claremont College believe black lives actually matter and want to do something about it, or are you just a bunch of hacks using dead bodies to advance political goals?

Here is your chance to answer that question to the world as loudly as you protested Ms. MacDonald.  May you have the wisdom to make the right choice.


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Olimometer 2.52

If you are not in the position to kick in your funds we’ll always accept your prayers.

Malone: You just fulfilled the first rule of law enforcement: make sure when your shift is over you go home alive. Here endeth the lesson.

The Untouchables 1987

Leonard: …Sheldon, you can’t train my girlfriend like a lab rat.
Sheldon: Actually, it turns out I can.
Leonard: Well, you shouldn’t.
Sheldon: There’s just no pleasing you, is there, Leonard? You weren’t happy with my previous approach to dealing with her, so I decided to employ operant conditioning techniques, building on the work of Thorndike and B.F. Skinner. By this time next week, I believe I can have her jumping out of a pool, balancing a beach ball on her nose.

The Big Bang Theory, The Gothowitz Deviation 2009

Over at IMDB there is an interesting story concerning Johnny Weissmuller the gold medal swimmer concerning his early days as the silver screen’s most famous Tarzan:

When Weissmuller was introduced to the first Cheetah in his Tarzan films in 1931 (he worked with 8 chimpanzees altogether), the chimp’s trainer told him to show no fear or the animal would attack him. As Weissmuller, dressed in his Tarzan loincloth and hunting knife, walked up to the animal, it bared its teeth, growled at him and lunged as if to attack him. Weissmuller took the knife out of the sheath and held it in front of the chimp’s nose, to make sure he saw and smelled it. He then slammed the animal on the side of the head with the knife handle. He put the knife back in its sheath and held out his hand to the chimp. It glared at him, bared his teeth again, then changed its mind, grinned at Weissmuller and jumped up and hugged him. Weissmuller never had any further problems with the chimp–although other cast and crew members did–and it followed him around like a puppy dog during all the pictures they worked together.

This is a perfect example of risk/reward, note that the Chimp didn’t change his nature, he still gave problems to the rest of the cast and crew, but when it came to Weissmuller the risk of the whack in the head outweighed the reward of giving him grief.

This perfectly illustrates this story out of LA concerning the arrest rate:

an Assistant Chief with the LAPD tells the Times the number of arrests has continued to decline. Similar declines were seen in other big cities including San Diego. The result is that the overall number of arrests in California is at its lowest level in nearly 50 years.

Now given the increase in the crime rate the drop in the arrest rate would seem rather odd, but if you consider risk and reward, it’s not odd at all.

But others say it is inevitable that some officers will pull back, taking care of necessary work while not engaging in the “proactive policing” that could lead to more arrests — and to more encounters that turn violent.

“Not to make fun of it, but a lot of guys are like, ‘Look, I’m just going to act like a fireman.’ I’m going to handle my calls for service and the things that I have to do,” said George Hofstetter, a motorcycle deputy in Pico Rivera and former president of the union representing L.A. County sheriff’s deputies. “But going out there and making traffic stops and contacting persons who may be up to something nefarious? ‘I’m not going to do that anymore.’”

A police job carries a good pay, good benefits and a fine retirement package (at least until the unfunded pension issue bubble bursts) that is to compensate for the risk to life and limb, but it’s not just a physical risk anymore, it’s a social and reputation risk that enters into it

LAPD officers are troubled by contentious demonstrations at Police Commission meetings and by public criticism of their colleagues for using deadly force, said Robert Harris, a police officer on the LAPD union’s board of directors.

“Suddenly, you feel like you can’t do any police work, because every opportunity that you have might turn into the next big media case,” Harris said. “Of course, you’re going to take stock a little bit more, I think, before you put yourself out there like that.”

Why on earth are you going to risk your financial security protecting people who are going to demand your head if you put yourself out there to protect them?  Particularly in a city and/or state governed by a party actively antagonistic to police officers and silent when they are targeted as illustrated in the last presidential campaign:

while President Obama and the Democratic candidates vying to succeed him are putting America’s police departments on trial in the court of public opinion in response to a rash of deadly police shootings, the murder of police officers on America’s streets is being met with a “deafening silence.”

“I cannot recall any time in recent years when six law enforcement professionals have been murdered by gunfire in multiple incidents in a single week,” National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund CEO Craig W. Floyd said in a statement Friday. “Already this year there have been eight officers shot and killed, compared to just one during the same period last year and represents a very troubling trend.”

The relative silence on officer deaths contrasts with the Democratic candidates’ often fiery language on police brutality against African Americans. When it came to the issue of law enforcement at Thursday night’s Democratic debate, the candidates focused almost exclusively on “police reform.” Vermont Sen. Sanders said he’s “sick and tired” of seeing unarmed black people shot by police, likening heavily equipped departments to “occupying armies” – a reference to Ferguson, Mo. and elsewhere. Hillary Clinton hit similar points.

And why would they act otherwise?  Given the supermajority of Democrats in the state, an electorate willing to reward them for attacking police and their lack of personal proximity to the areas of increased risk there is absolutely no incentive for elected Democrats to act otherwise, nor for professional liberals in academia:

If officers think twice about approaching people, some situations where police use force might be avoided, said Melina Abdullah, a leader of the local Black Lives Matter movement and chair of the Pan-African studies department at Cal State L.A.

“If police are more cautious about making arrests that might be controversial, making arrests that might elicit protests, then that is a victory,” Abdullah said. “We want them to begin to check themselves.”

who I suspect,  outside of an organized march wouldn’t be caught dead in the areas where crime is increasing as the police back off.  Victor Davis Hanson has these folks nailed:

The American progressive elite relies on its influence, education, money, and cultural privilege to exempt itself from the bad schools, unassimilated immigrant communities, dangerous neighborhoods, crime waves, and general impoverishment that are so often the logical consequences of its own policies — consequences for others, that is.

And of course while the negative reinforcement is being delivered to police the opposite message is being delivered to criminals, as the risk of arrest and punishment decreases, the incentive to engage in criminal behavor increases.  thus the rewards for everything from petty theft to intimidation and threats of violence increases for the criminal class while at the same time the incentive for a potential victim to call the police decreases.  Why bother calling the cops if they aren’t going to follow through?  Much better to keep your mouth shut and hope the gangs, the druggies and the thugs just leave you alone.

And this isn’t just confined to the cities, Hanson again:

Let me narrate a recent two-week period in navigating the outlands of Fresno County. A few days ago my neighbor down the road asked whether I had put any outgoing mail in our town’s drive-by blue federal mailbox, adjacent to the downtown Post Office. I had. And he had, too —to have it delivered a few hours later to his home in scraps, with the checks missing, by a good Samaritan. She had collected the torn envelopes with his return address scattered along the street. I’m still waiting to see whether my own bills got collected before the thieves struck the box. Most of us in rural California go into town to mail our letters, because our rural boxes have been vandalized by gangs so frequently that it is suicidal to mail anything from home.

No wonder the rest of the country doesn’t want to be ruled by California.


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Olimometer 2.52

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Chicago’s lakefront

By John Ruberry

“Decent people shouldn’t live here. They’d be happier someplace else.”
Jack Napier/The Joker in Batman.

Often, I’m asked, “Why is Chicago so corrupt?” The short answer? It’s always been that way.

Now let me expand a bit.

Earlier this month the Department of Justice released a report that excoriated the Chicago Police Department for use of excessive force, slipshod training, and soft discipline within its ranks. The report was produced because of the shooting in 2014–with sixteen bullets–of an unarmed teen black Laquan McDonald by a white Chicago cop.

But the Chicago Tribune’s John Kass noted a significant omission in that report: Chicago’s corruption culture.

It wasn’t the Chicago cops who shaped the police culture. The political corruption and cynicism of politicians over decades in a one-party Democratic machine town shaped the culture.

Kass adds that it was City Hall that sat on the damning police video of McDonald getting shot. It was released over a year later–seven months after Mayor Rahm Emanuel was releected. Kass, without mentioning his name, reminded readers that longtime CPD chief of detectives, William Hanhardt, was placed in that position by his political friends. Hanhardt, a mob cop, ran a jewelry theft ring while he was chasing select other bad guys.

But why is Chicago so corrupt?

Chicago, like other Midwestern cities, was settled first by New Englanders and upstate New Yorkers, white Anglo-Saxon protestants mainly. But Irish people fleeing the Potato Famine and seeking work on such projects as the Illinois & Michigan Canal, along with Germans, were the first wave of immigrants to Chicago. My great-great grandfather, another John Ruberry, was part of this wave. But the Irish already knew English and the arguably more numerous Germans initially did not. Which meant that the Irish were able to qualify for government jobs. Then some of them made the logical next step–run for political office.

The eighteenth-century Irish were unwilling subjects of the British Empire–they viewed government as an alien force and many didn’t see anything wrong with stealing from that government. Old habits are hard to break–and many Irish-Americans saw public service as an opportunity to stuff their pockets with bribes and kickbacks–and to place their friends and relatives in other government positions. Or to offer other friends and relatives government contracts, who might reward their patrons with “gifts.”

So Chicago’s culture of corruption was born.

Other immigrants followed–many with similar backgrounds. Poles didn’t have their own nation for the entire 18th century, the majority of Chicago’s Italian immigrants came from southern Italy, and there was no love between them and the Italian royal house, which emerged from the northern half of the peninsula. The Czechs and the Croatians were part of Austria-Hungary.

Abandoned South Side home

Even newcomers to Chicago who were Americans fit the bill.

Until the mid-1960s blacks who came to Chicago as part of the Great Migration were subject to Jim Crow laws and could not vote. Clearly local government was not their government. Puerto Rican corruption is even worse than that of Chicago.

You can make the same argument about Mexico, the latest source of mass-immigration to Chicago.

Another Chicago newspaper columnist, the legendary Mike Royko, often quipped that Chicago’s official slogan should be “Where’s mine?”

Roughly once every 18 months a Chicago alderman is sentenced to prison. One of Chicago’s dirtiest secrets is the coziness between politicians and street gangs.

My point is not to demonize any group but to explain how Chicago got to the unhappy place where it is. For instance, my father, another John Ruberry–he went by Jack–once told my mother, “I’d like to work in politics.” She replied, “That will never work out–you are too honest.” My dad was 100-percent Irish-American. And yes, my mother was right–and my father never ran for public office. This decent man moved his family out of Chicago in 1968.

Meanwhile, Chicago, and yes, the rest of Illinois is a cesspool of cronyism and corruption.

Oh, you WASPs, particularly Republican ones reading this post–I’m coming for you.

Much is made of Chicago not having a Republican mayor since 1931. But that mayor was William Hale Thompson, a Boston-born Protestant who was probably Chicago’s most corrupt mayor. Thompson was a protector and sponsor of Al Capone. Thompson, a crook, was able to reap dishonest benefits from a crooked bureaucracy that was already in place. After his death two safe deposit boxes containing nearly $2 million were discovered. Although Thompson’s successor, Czech immigrant Anton Cermak, founded the modern Chicago Democratic machine, he was a better mayor than Thompson.

I began with a quote from one Batman movie and I’ll end this post with a quote from another, this time from Batman Begins.

The League of Shadows has been a check against human corruption for thousands of years. We sacked Rome, loaded trade ships with plague rats, burned London to the ground. Every time a civilization reaches the pinnacle of its decadence, we return to restore the balance.

John “Lee” Ruberry of the Magnificent Seven

Chicago is clearly in decline. Payoffs to public-sector union members, pensions that weren’t properly funded, gave Chicagoans–including of course the decent ones–their largest property tax hike ever two years ago, followed by more tax increases last year. No serious person believes there won’t be more soon. Last year more Chicagoans were murdered than those killed in New York City and Los Angeles–combined.

Chicago is at its lowest population in one hundred years, coincidentally, that was when Chicago was still a boom town and William Hale Thompson was mayor.

While there is no League of Shadows, Chicago is long overdue for a check against human corruption.

Where is Chicago’s Bruce Wayne?

Or its Bruce Waynes?

And no, I’m not calling for bubonic plague in Chicago. The city is emptying out just fine on its own.

John Ruberry, a decent man who moved his family out of Chicago in 1999, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit. 

“What the hell have you got to lose?”

Donald Trump on why black voters should consider voting for him

On the day after a group of Hillary supporters in North carolina decided the best way to protest police was to loot a Walmart the Massachusetts Supreme Court, the court that decided that John Adams put a right to gay marriage in our constitution has brought us this gem of a ruling: (Via Kevin Daily of the Daily Caller)

We do not eliminate flight as a factor in the reasonable suspicion analysis whenever a black male is the subject of an investigatory stop. However, in such circumstances, flight is not necessarily probative of a suspect’s state of mind or consciousness of guilt. Rather, the finding that black males in Boston are disproportionately and repeatedly targeted for FIO encounters suggests a reason for flight totally unrelated to consciousness of guilt. Such an individual, when approached by the police, might just as easily be motivated by the desire to avoid the recurring indignity of being racially profiled as by the desire to hide criminal activity. Given this reality for black males in the city of Boston, a judge should, in appropriate cases, consider the report’s findings in weighing flight as a factor in the reasonable suspicion calculus.

Or to put it another way, the Massachusetts Supreme Court rules that Boston police are such racists that it is reasonable for a black person to flee is approached by police.

Now given what happened with gay marriage the implication of such a ruling if applied nationwide could be astounding but lets consider something else.

Massachusetts is a state that has voted GOP one in my lifetime in a national election (1984 Ronald Reagan). Boston is its capital and you would be hard pressed to find a more liberal city in the US nor one that votes for Democrats more lopsidedly. These are facts everyone knows, but let me point out one fun fact from Answers.com that you might not know

boston-mayor

So it is the opinion of the Massachusetts Supreme court that the end result of 86 years of Democrat rule is Boston is a police force so racist that for a black man, no matter how innocent, fleeing from police is a perfectly valid response.

This leads to a rather obvious question for Minority voters in Boston with an election coming up that echos Donald Trump:

If 86 years of Democrat rule has brought you to this point, what do you have to lose by voting Republican?

It took 86 years to break the curse of the Bambino in Boston, perhaps it’s time for Boston to break this curse too.


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Illinois signBy John Ruberry

Back in the 1990s, former US Rep Mel Reynolds (D-IL) was described as a one-man crime wave.

Until his suicide on September 1, Fox Lake, Illinois police lieutenant Joseph Gliniewicz, was a similar felonious phenomenon.

Until last week this was the narrative of the cop nicknamed “GI Joe.” The veteran police officer, who was scheduled to retire in two weeks, was murdered after he chased three men into a wooded area. On Labor Day crowds lined his 18-mile long funeral procession, held signs, and gave salutes as Gliniewicz’ hearse rolled past. GI Joe was portrayed as a selfless volunteer with the Fox Lake post of the Police Explorers, a group that mentors young people considering careers in law enforcement.

For several days after Gliniewicz’ death national media reported from Fox Lake, their helicopters flew over Fox Lake as it showed cops scouring the woods and wetlands outside of Fox Lake as they searched for evidence and the suspects.

Last week Lake County officials revealed that Gliniewicz’ death was an elaborately staged suicide so it would look like a murder. Taking one’s life is sadly somewhat common among police officers, but this Fox Lake suicide revealed a different malady–Illinois-style corruption.

Fox Lake administrator Anne Marrin was investigating GI Joe for embezzlement of Explorers funds; Gliniewicz was allegedly using that cash to make mortgage payments, adult web site subscriptions, vacations, and health club memberships. Text messages from Gliniewicz suggest the he may have been considering framing Ferrin for drunk driving or cocaine possession. And it can’t get worse, can it? It can. GI Jerk was considering contacting a motorcycle gang to put a hit on Marrin.

The creepy cop had a mistress–there is nothing illegal about that–but investigators are now looking into the possibility that Gliniewicz arranged a phony marriage between that woman and his son, who was in the army, so she could fraudulently collect military benefits.

In 2003 it was revealed that Gliniewicz served a thirty-day suspension for sexual harassment.

Yes, GI Joe was a one-man crime wave.

Well, at least for now that is the situation, because there are reports Gliniewicz’ wife and one of his sons are under criminal investigation. And it’s hard to believe that at least some members of the Fox Lake police department didn’t at least suspect that GI Joe was a crook.

And with corruption so rampant among Illinois government, it’s possible that some of his co-workers just threw their hands in the air and exclaimed, “That’s the way it is Illinois and there is no way to change it.”

However…

John "Lee" Ruberry
John “Lee” Ruberry

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing,” Edmund Burke once said.

And there is plenty of nothing going on in corrupt Illinois.

One more item: As bad as Illinois is, nearly all police officers are honest here.

John Ruberry, a fifth-generation Illinois resident, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

opiate awareness 2 036Yesterday at the upper common of Fitchburg Ma a group of over 70 people turned out for an event highlighting Opiate Awareness and the people and families who are affected by them.

I arrived near the time things were about to start and talked to Lauren who seemed to be in charge.

There were several speakers, one of them was our state rep Steve DiNatale who is running for Mayor

And the Police Chief

The stress of the event was addiction as a disease and coping with it. Nobody talked better on the struggle between being firm and being kind than Tami Arguelles founder of the local group: Help for our Community.

The need to find the balance between loving and caring for a person, while not enabling or approving is for the families and friends of the addicted the hardest thing.

They had some ceremonial events the lighting of candles

The Releasing of Balloons

and a moment of silence

.

Some spoke about their loss like Ed.

Other were there simply to stand for their lost loved ones. I spoke to the police chief after the event:

and I spoke to two former addicts one before things started:

and the second after, this was Reverend Hollaway who had spoken before

What really truck me about both of them was their words about the Just Say No campaign from the 80’s. This type of thing was routinely laughed at by our friends of the left but both of these ex addicts noted that a direct statement, a solid “NO” makes a difference.

But the real story to me was that every police car in Fitchburg is equipped with Narcan which can be the difference between life and death for a person.

The other half of the coin of course is the prevention, the chief talked about getting old prescription drugs out of the house but the other part of the game is something quite simple and direct. If you see someone dealing drugs on your street corner in your neighborhood don’t just ignore it and figure it’s not your business: Say Something. Call the police, tweet the police, help them protect you.

If you don’t want the cost of the Drugs and Gangs, stand up and fight, even if it’s just a phone call. The harder you make it for the dealer, the more likely he’s going to at worst move on, or at best find themselves caught.

The event made the front page of the Sentinel, you can read it here.

Chicago police in riot gear in 2012
Chicago police in riot gear in 2012

By John Ruberry

Urban riots are sometimes isolated incidents, such as the 1992 Los Angeles outburst of lawlessness after the Rodney King-beatings verdict was announced, or they come in waves, as they did during the Red Summer of 1919 and the Riots of 1967.

This morning a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll found that an astounding 96 percent of Americans expect more city riots this summer. Warm weather often brings out the worst in people–for instance, murder rates increase during the summer.

I’m not going to delve into the root causes of the 1919 and 1967 disturbances–click on the above links if you want to learn more–I’m just here to discuss 2015.

Last year’s Ferguson, Missouri riots and April’s Baltimore uproar have similar ingredients–the death of a young black male after coming into contact with the police in a poverty-stricken area–and the participation of “professional protesters,” anarchists really, in the melee.

Anarchists marching in Chicago in 2012
Anarchists marching in Chicago in 2012

This is a sad truth, but it’s very likely that a black youth resisting arrest will die this summer. When that happens, leftists in the media such as MSNBC’s reckless loudmouth Al Sharpton will label the police department responsible involved as racist–even though these self-appointed experts will only have a cursory grasp of the facts. Through social media and cell phones, the rapid deployment force of the extreme left, those professional protesters, will descend into that jurisdiction. And then the locals will be incited to riot.

Perhaps I am wrong. Hopefully duty-bound police chiefs and mayors across America who believe–correctly–that the most important duty of any government is to protect its citizens, will study the Ferguson and Baltimore riots and devise an effective defense strategy.

Stay tuned but stay safe.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Chicago's skyline
Chicago’s skyline

By John Ruberry

Four weeks from now Chicagoans will return to the polls and choose between the remaining two candidates for mayor–former Obama White House Chief of Staff and incumbent Rahm Emanuel and Cook County Commissioner Jesus “Chuy” (pronounced ‘chewie’) Garcia.

Interestingly, the candidates are often referred to by the mainstream media as Rahm or Chuy–I will for the most part follow suit.

Unlike in 2011, this time around Rahm didn’t receive a majority in the first round of voting, which is a defeat of sorts for the imperious, hot-tempered mayor, who swept the local media endorsements before the first tally.

Chicago’s far-left, including Bill Ayers, has lined up behind Chuy who finished a distant second to Rahm. As for Emanuel, he’s been dubbed Mayor One Percent by those lefties. Rahm’s wealth has been an issue with them, but the mayor has parlayed his business reputation–as well as his White House connections–to recruit over 30 corporate headquarters to Chicago, including most notably Motorola Mobility. Most of those new jobs have gone downtown, allowing Garcia’s opponents to make the same accusation against Rahm that all of his recent predecessors had to endure–that he only cares about the moneyed-class of the skyscraper set.

Chicago's Northwest Side
Chicago’s Northwest Side

Rahm has chipped away at Chicago’s pension bomb, but the long-term prognosis is poor, so much so that Illinois’ Republican governor, Bruce Rauner–a friend of Rahm’s–says that Chicago is on the road to bankruptcy. Forty-nine schools, mostly in poor areas, were closed under Rahm, but Chicago is losing population, particularly in its blighted areas–what else could be done? Chuy pledges to reopen some of those schools, but of course he isn’t saying how he would pay for that.

Garcia is surely gaining some votes by vowing to eliminate red light cameras. Chicago has more red light cameras than any other city. Those cameras contribute $500 million to the city’s coffers–and reliance on such a detested source for revenue is another black mark against Rahm.

But what does Chuy offer Chicago voters? Other than vague promises to be for the people and not the one percent at the top of the financial pyramid–not a whole lot.

Violent crime has been another issue Rahm has faced. Chicago, with a far-smaller population, has more murders every year than New York–but does anyone seriously believe that a leftist can be as a better crime fighter? Hostility to the police is part of the DNA of the ultra-liberal–see New York’s mayor Bill DeBlasio. Who knows, maybe NYC will leapfrog past Chicago in murders in a few years. But such an occurrence will only obscure Chicago’s violent crime problem.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Relations between the public and police forces are at an all-time low. They could hardly get worse. Some of the officers seem to believe they are playing soldier. The governing bodies encourage this attitude by providing high-tech playthings of limited value to sworn civilian peace officers. What a sorry state of affairs!
Police prefer the low-hanging fruit.  Examples:  You and me.  It’s only rational for cops to arrest old ladies who won’t give them any lip for speeding on an otherwise empty highway; it’s a whole lot safer for them.  Trying to intervene in a crime being committed by a young strong black man is likely to get someone hurt.
I will concede that the murder of two innocent patrolmen was a heinous crime.  I will further admit that the grand juries in both Ferguson and New York did their duty as specified by law, and that Al Sharpton et al are a disgrace to the good name of rabble-rousers who have brought a lot of grief to the body politic.
So the police in New York City are withholding their services.  They are not “on strike” because striking is illegal.  They are showing up for work but not doing anything.  They will be out there, neglecting their duties.  So, you will no longer have your car towed if you stay overtime in a parking spot–bliss!

There is a downside to this, though.  New York will become like San Francisco, a place where the homeless use public fountains as toilets, panhandle aggressively, and menace harmless pedestrians with their threatening demeanor.  The squeegee men will be back, offering their unwanted attentions to motorists.  This will return the quality of life to the pre-Giulani area, while the New York Times laments the ungovernablity of the city and demands smaller classroom and higher pay for teachers in order to attack the “root causes” of crime. Tourists will flee and businesses will struggle.
I think we need to rethink what we want from policing. Are the police a source of revenue, like bingo games in church meeting rooms?  Or are they employed to protect the public?
The public has mixed feelings about all this. Most citizens don’t want to see excessive violence in our streets; they would prefer justice be tempered by prudence. But when push comes to shove, law-abiding citizens will come down squarely on the side of local police forces. They can’t afford to do otherwise; these forces stand between us and anarchy.

By John Ruberry

One of the slogans of the anti-police protesters is “Black lives matter.” By the way, I don’t know anyone who thinks otherwise. As I wrote in this space last week, I have doubts about the real motivation of the anti-cop movement, which I view as a proxy for the real fight of leftists–socialist revolution.

Out of the mainstream media eye is sad Buffalo, New York. As with Detroit, the one-time 15th largest city in the United States has been plagued by deindustrialization and depopulation–Buffalo, which has 260,000 residents, is now America’s 45th largest city.

Last year was another rough one for the Queen City. Murders soared in 2014–there were 62–whereas there were only 47 the year prior.

Of last year’s killings in Buffalo–a minuscule 14 of them were solved–that’s fewer than one-quarter. As for black lives–over eighty percent of those murder victims were African-American.

Early last month there was a large protest in Buffalo decrying the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. That’s quite ironic, because there were 12 murders there in December, the most of 2014. There were about a dozen shootings in Buffalo in the last two weeks of the year. Sure there are anti-crime groups in New York’s state’s second largest city, but they lack, which is a good thing, the stridency of the anti-police movement. But I have to wonder, where are the anti-crime protests in Buffalo?

You’ve heard of Brown and Garner. But the name Denell A. Baker is probably one you don’t know. On December 28, he became the 62nd homicide victim in Buffalo–shot to death in the Fruit Belt neighborhood. I don’t know Baker’s race. But let me end this post in this manner: Black lives matter. All lives matter.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.