by baldilocks

Are the days of the famous University of Notre Dame mascot numbered? Some dude at ESPN hopes so.

During a debate Tuesday over the Cleveland Indian’s recent decision to drop their “Chief Wahoo” logo, ESPN “First Take” host Max Kellerman argued the Notre Dame Fighting Irish mascot is offensive as well.

Kellerman said he is personally thanked every time he visits a reservation for his public opposition to Native-American mascots in sports.

“When I go to Native-American reservations around the country to call fights, I am approached—I’ve received feathers [Ed.: really?] in honor and letters saying, ‘Thank you for your stance,'” he said.

Based on that anecdotal evidence, he dismissed a Washington Post survey that found nine out of 10 Native-Americans are not offended by team names like the NFL’s Washington Redskins. (…)

“Many Irish-Americans are not offended, but many are. And should that also change? The answer is yes, unequivocally yes,” Kellerman said, as his guest Will Cain groaned and facepalmed.

I’m with ya, Will.

As an honorary holder of the Irish Card – it’s the O thing – I have permission to speak on this: are you fecking kidding? Some of my best friends are straight-from-the island Irish! (Yes, I played that card, too.) I can’t wait to tell them about it. They will laugh their butts off.

Back when the Redskins were under fire for their mascot, someone asked me what I would do if a professional sports team decided to change its mascot to, say, the New England Zulu Nation.

Answer: buy a jersey.

All cheekiness aside, this is getting out of hand.

Next? To name a few …

Boston Celtics.

Minnesota Vikings.

New York Yankees.

My high school alma mater, the LA Romans. /gratuitous

And, definitely the LA Raiders and the Pittsburg Pirates. Pirates were and are often Muslim.

Watch and see.

(Thanks to Ed Driscoll)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!

by baldilocks

Remember that old warning that came from your parents if you said a bad word?

“If you say that again, I’ll wash your mouth out with soap.” Of course, my various parental units never had occasion to give me that warning because I was Miss Goodie Two Shoes, baby. Now might be a different story.

Anyway, some kids are preemptively putting soap in their mouths and swallowing it; not because they feel guilty for using four-letter words; not because they feel dirty inside.

But, just because.

Spring cleaning may be several months away, but laundry detergent is making big headlines this week as a dangerous stunt called the “Tide Pod Challenge” is going viral on YouTube and other social media platforms.

The challenge is for participants –- primarily teens and young adults, in the videos making the rounds –- to put the pods into their mouths, sometimes even chew them, and then post videos of what happens. Some of these individuals experience foaming at the mouth and severe coughing spells after consuming a pod.

It’s more than just a strange behavior, it’s potentially deadly. Here are some facts about the craze to help

friends and family protect teens from the hazardous experiment.

What are Tide pods?

Tide pods, the brand’s version of the popular laundry detergent pods, are small packets of detergent designed to dissolve while washing clothes. Each pod contains pre-measured, concentrated detergent levels.

The outside wrapping of a tide pod is made of polyvinylalcohol (PVA), a water soluble plastic compound. For the same reason that this packet dissolves in the machine washing laundry [sic], it can also dissolve in a person’s mouth — leading to the immediate release and absorption of the contents.

Even if the stuff couldn’t kill you, who would want to put soap in their mouths? The whole reason that the old-school fake threat was so useful was that soap tastes horrible.

But, as a friend pointed out, we old people did crazy things when we were kids. My “crazy” usually involved biking/rolling skating down a steep incline. Helmets and knee-pads never crossed our minds or those of our parents.

In short, old-school crazy usually involved fun.

But I guess You Tube fame is the new fun.

May they all remove themselves from my lawn with prejudice. As a matter of fact, I don’t even want them on my street. That much stupidity is probably more contagious than this year’s flu.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism!

by baldilocks

When I was growing up, my parents did not look kindly on anyone who would call during the dinner hour—and woe to the perspective suitor that did so! Even now, I don’t make personal calls during the hours from 6PM to 8PM, especially not to my parents.

BlackBrunch
All these years of brunching and I didn’t know that it was a white thing!

And even during the usual hours for the other two meals, I hesitate to call, unless the person asks me to do so. Civilized families sit down together to eat and it’s rude to interrupt a meal, at least that’s how I was raised. So one can imagine how I feel about this.

For the second time in two weeks, the misguided mob was at it again on Sunday in New York and San Francisco, disrupting peaceful omelets and eggs Benedicts, challenging gay brunchers to a contest of victimization and this holiday weekend, pretending the claim the mantle of Martin Luther King Jr. as a civil rights cause.

All in all a pretty busy Sunday for people who probably don’t do much the rest of the week.

But you’d think their mothers might have told them: Annoying people is no way to make friends.

I told the story about my family to address this very point: the mothers of these Defenders of Blackness probably never made it a point to sit down regularly at a certain time to eat a meal uninterrupted ever–much less tell them that common sense bit about being annoying. (And let’s not even go there about their fathers.) Therefore, these uncouth, short-term thinkers view a pleasant, peaceful meal among family and friends as something “white” that they need to disrupt with their “blackness.”

Lots of people are wondering what these people are trying to accomplish by inserting themselves into someone’s breakfast. I don’t. They are merely enjoying the look on the faces of the patrons. White, scrunched up expressions give them joy. All that crap about #blacklivesmatter is mere cover for the juvenile joy of disrupting something that white persons are enjoying. They are undisciplined, uncivilized brats, funded by other undisciplined, uncivilized brats.

When this happened a few weeks ago, I joked that there used to be a time when interrupting a meal was grounds for a duel. We’ll see what happens if the “Black Brunch” crowd decides to grow some stones and take their show on the road to a Red State.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>baldilocks

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by baldilocksimage

By now, those of us who pay attention to such things know about the feminist-created furor whipped up about Dr. Matt Taylor and his Space Chicks shirt–that last being a Hawaiian-style celebration of pulcritude and firearms.

Some of the pushback opinions rightly center on feminist hypocrisy and the questionable priorities of those who would harp on the sartorial choices of a man as he celebrates one of the most monumental of goals: landing an object on a comet hundreds of millions of miles away from Earth.

But I think that the outrage about the man’s shirt speaks to something more basic in feminists, a factor which they sublimate–either accidentally or on purpose. It’s a factor which nearly all women consider and there is a counterpart in most men.

What do most men do to attract women? They work and they do so to show that they can provide–for themselves and, ultimately–for a prospective female mate.

In parallel, what do most women do to attract men? They make themselves look good. Usually that involves appearing as young as possible. (Sometimes past possible, but that’s another topic.)

A man who cannot provide for himself or his family is deemed less than masculine–less than a man. And, of course, a woman who is less physically pleasing to the eye is deemed less feminine, and therefore less-preferred in the mating sweepstakes.

All of that points to procreation. You know this. I know this. Anyone who doesn’t have his/her head in the clouds–or other lower, darker locales–knows this.

Feminists know this too. Subconsciously. But they can’t admit it or even acknowledge it to themselves. All of that egregious Bravo Sierra about the shirt discouraging women from entering STEM careers serves to cover something even more ridiculous.

Feminists are jealous of buxom blonde, scantily-clad cartoon women.

As I have been saying all over the Internet, if the shirt had been plastered with naked Lena Dunham clones, we wouldn’t be having this conversation right now. Or at least I wouldn’t. Illustrated vamps make feminists feel inadequate as women. Consider that next time you try to reason with these creatures.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

 Baldilocks mini