It’s a good thing that Nick Foles’ Christian faith doesn’t prevent him from playing football on a Sunday, particularly last Sunday.

The MVP and Super Bowl champion has never shied away from his belief in God.

His Twitter bio reads: “Believer in Jesus Christ, husband, father, son, brother.”

More than a few sports reporters cringed when Foles held his postgame news conference after the Super Bowl. “I wouldn’t be out here without God, without Jesus in my life. I can tell you that, first and foremost in my life, I don’t have the strength to come out here and play a game like that,” he said.

Few Eagles fans and even fewer journalists expected that Foles could bring Philadelphia a single victory in the playoffs, let alone a Super Bowl victory.

But his unbelievable performance in the big game is a continuing saga of perseverance. Foles almost quit football after a crisis of confidence over his future when he fell from a superb year in 2013 with the Eagles to a backup role with the Los Angeles Rams.

But his belief in God continued to pull him through. “It took a lot more faith to come back and play than it would’ve to go in the other direction,” Foles told The Associated Press. “Either way would’ve been fine. Either way, I would’ve trusted in God. I would’ve done something else and glorified God in that instance. I knew as a person that the more growth I’ve had and the more opportunity I would have to glorify God and trust in him would be to go back and play football.”

Foles said he wants to become a pastor once his playing career is over–a career that looks a lot brighter than it did only two months ago when he took over as quarterback when Carson Wentz suffered a knee injury.

The Eagles quarterback is a graduate student at Liberty University where he studies religion. In fact, the school, which preacher Jerry Falwell founded, turned on the Rawlings School of Divinity in Eagle midnight green to honor Foles.

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It’s worth noting that Wentz, the quarterback Foles replaced after an injury, is a devout Christian. Even offensive coordinator Frank Reich is an ordained Presbyterian minister.

According to FaithWire, the Eagles even conducted a baptism in a hotel pool. “A photo posted to Twitter shows wide receiver Marcus Johnson being baptized in a hotel pool while surrounded by his teammates,” the site reports, calling the Eagles “possibly be the most spiritually active NFL team around.”

Foles was among that group, as was Wentz. ESPN has also chronicled the team’s devotion to religion, indicating that players hold Bible studies. “The presence of faith is not unique to the Eagles, though the way in which it has manifested might be,” reported ESPN.

Maybe the Eagles did have God in their corner. Foles and some of his fellow Christians helped answer the prayers of downtrodden Eagles fans who suffered through a nearly six-decade championship drought. Thanks, Saint Nick!

Like almost everything, the Super Bowl has become as much a political event as a game.

DaTimes’ Frank Bruni, one of the most leftist columnists at the newspaper, has written an incredibly obnoxious analysis of The Big Game. The headline itself is a neck-snapper: “The Existential Hell of This Year’s Super Bowl.”

“Football, like Trumpism, likes to believe that it’s about working-class folks in the heartland. But this year’s Super Bowl, like the Trump administration, bows to the Acela corridor. It nearly brought together two teams from underexposed cities, Jacksonville and Minneapolis. Instead it brings together two teams from celebrated theaters of history in the Northeast. So much for the little guy,” Bruni opines.

This comes from someone who is so much a part of the Acela corridor that he can’t even see how effete his analysis is anymore. His main claim to fame is that he is the first openly gay columnist for DaTimes.

But there’s more from Bruni.

“During the 2016 campaign, the Patriots’ owner, Robert Kraft, attested to Trump’s fine character, while the Patriots’ coach, Bill Belichick, wrote privately to Trump to congratulate him for his perseverance, telling him, ‘Your leadership is amazing.’”

Failing in his politically correct assessment, Bruni then just gets nasty. “[W]hen he looks at the Patriots’ glamour-puss quarterback, Tom Brady, he sees a younger, less quizzically coifed version of himself, complete with a foreign-born model for a wife. Trust me on this. He just squints extra hard, sucks in his gut and begs Melania to answer to ‘Gisele’ for a while.”

As a resident of Philadelphia, I would like to see the Eagles win. The city has been starved for a champion since the Phils’ 2008 World Series victory. Villanova is in the suburbs so its national basketball championship doesn’t really count in the city.

Moreover, if the Eagles win, sports writers will be flummoxed again by quarterback Nick Foles praising God after a victory.

Nevertheless, the Eagles have a significantly high number of protestors during the national anthem. One of the team’s most prominent members, Malcolm Jenkins, pushed a policy for “emotional training” for cops, and the Philadelphia police have complained and the players’ sentiments. See https://www.cnsnews.com/blog/craig-bannister/nfl-network-air-eagles-players-call-emotional-intelligence-training-police

Even though my Philadelphia friends may disown me, I could live with a New England win, particularly since it would be politically incorrect among the “intellectual” elite.

Simply put, it’s a win-win for me in this existential hell! Sorry, Frank.

Chicago’s South Side last autumn

By John Ruberry

Position wanted: Starting quarterback.

A dismal National Football League season will end tonight when between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots meet in the Super Bowl in Houston, after of course our national anthem is performed.

Oh, Da Tech Guy himself, a Patriots fan, may not agree of my “dismal” assessment. His team is in the Super Bowl, not mine, the Chicago Bears.

The Star Spangled Banner has been one of the major NFL stories this season, much to the chagrin to league brass because San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the anthem, which of course is performed before every game. A few members from roughly one-third of the other NFL teams followed his unpatriotic lead, along with some college and high school athletes. Kaepernick’s beef with the anthem is that he believes America stands for racial prejudice and police brutality, which are ideas you’ll find in the playbook of Black Lives Matters radicals, not the 49ers. Kaepernick, who is black but was raised by white parents, is a millionaire. Although NFL rules prohibit him from making it official until next month, Kaepernick will be a free agent next month, an ESPN reporter reported Friday. The timing is curious–I suspect that two days before the Super Bowl was chosen because of hyping of the game itself, and the revealing of the new NFL Hall of Fame inductees on Saturday, would bury the Kaepernick self-firing, as his anti-anthem, and yes, anti-America protests have been an embarrassment to the league.

TV ratings were down eight percent for the 2016 season, more so earlier on as the Kaepernick story was festering. While some liberal journalists chose to ignore the Kaepernick factor when reporting the ratings decline, pointing out that concerns over concussions, the lack of NFL star power, particularly in the first four weeks of the season when Patriots’ quarterback Tom Brady was under suspension because of Deflategate, and viewers being more interested in the raucous presidential election were the real cause, an early October poll by Rasmussen found that nearly one-third of Americans said they’d be less likely to watch an NFL contest because of the anthem protests.

Soon the bidding war will begin for Kaepernick. Or maybe not. While he did take the 49ers to the Super Bowl four years ago, he performed poorly during his last two seasons; in 2016 Kaepernick was 1-10 as starter. I only watched him play once on television in ’16, on a snowy day against another rotten team, the Chicago Bears, Kaepernick completed just one pass out of five attempts with four yards gained. He was sacked five times.

The 49ers signed Kaepernick to win football games–not to be a radical.  The other 31 NFL teams will be looking to sign a winner as quarterback, not someone who gets sacked more times than the yards he passed for. Oh, some team will sign him, only because of his Super Bowl pedigree. But can Kaepernick survive training camp roster cuts?

NFL: Your long Colin Kaepernick nightmare may soon be over.

On a personal note, I will be rooting for the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl. I usually line up behind the NFC champion, but because Tom Brady is under attack by leftists for not backing out of his friendship with President Donald Trump, I am part of the Patriots Nation today. Go Pats!

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

By John Ruberry

It’s Super Bowl Sunday and besides the game, another story is the plethora of Super Bowl commercials.

Yes, kickoff is hours from now, and the advertisement I’m excoriating will air on only on Fox 32 Chicago, but I’m confident that by 9pm Central Time, Mini Abe’s Spontaneous Somewhat Super Premiere, produced by the tourism office of the Illinois Department of Commerce, will be the worst commercial I’ll see.

It ends with Mini Abe, a plastic version of Illinois icon Abraham Lincoln, getting crushed by a football.

Taxpayers shelled out $127,500 for this ad.

Look out below:

What the heck was that?

Well, I’ll try to explain.

Today’s ad is a reworking of Mini Abe’s Spontaneous Fall. It was creepy then and it is creepy now.

illinois route 66
Where is Abe?

And it’s an ineffective messenger for Illinois tourism sites–the only locations I could identify in the commercial were the Willis (Sears) Tower, Pontiac and Route 66, the Chicagoland Speedway, and (I think) the Mississippi River.

But if I wanted to ride on a Zip Line with Mini Abe, where in Illinois would I do that? Mini Abe doesn’t say.

Things are not well in the Land of Lincoln.

Illinois taxpayers are burdened by $7 billion in unpaid bills and over $100 billion in pension debt. I wonder if Fox 32 demanded that $127,500 up front?

And to those people who’ll say, ‘well, the commercial only costs a bit more than $100,000,’ I offer this retort, a paraphrase of a famous comment possibly made by Everett Dirksen, Illinois’ greatest senator:

A hundred thousand dollars here, and a hundred thousand dollars there, and pretty soon we’re talking real money.

Besides corruption, Illinois government is good at only one other thing–wasting money.

As for Lincoln, first he gets shot, now he has to suffer from this Super Bowl indignity.

Update DTG:  Stacy McCain links.  I find myself wondering how connected this ad agency is.  FYI if you are a social conservative find out how to solve the AIDS crisis in a few easy steps and discover why the Dana Loesch & the Woody Allen Story are the same story.

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Olimometer 2.52

It’s a brand new week and month. The days of wine and roses and having the mortgage paid a full week before it’s due is over.

Instead we are once again starting a new short month and unfortunately while it has 2-3 less days than any other the Mortgage bill is the same as any other.

So once again we have a $345 weekly goal to secure the cost of the mortgage and the payday for DaMagnificent Seven.

That means I need 17 of you to kick in $20 this week to get our monthly goals started on the right track.

Be part of another year of success, Hit DaTipJar below.

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By Steve Eggleston

Tomorrow, the 48th edition of the most-watched television event in America takes place from New York East Rutheford, New Jersey. Earlier in the week, Pete took a look at the waste of money that is spent on the ads aired during the game.

Meanwhile, the Fox affiliate in Detroit did a compelling story on the lengths the mayor of the city that actually is hosting the game went in an attempt to get tickets to the game. It isn’t suprising that the NFL itself overlooked the city actually hosting its biggest game.

It has been a while since I did prognostications on the NFL, but it is time to focus on the game itself.

The big story is the top-rated offense in points, yards per game, and passing yards per game, the Denver Broncos, going up against the top-rated defense in points, yards per game, and passing yards per game, the Seattle Seahawks. It really will be the case of the irresistable force meeting the immovable object – the Broncos just don’t make mistakes in the passing game, while the Seahawks not only forced the most interceptions in the regular season, they gave up the fewest big plays through the air.

The Broncos have a servicable run game, but the Seahawks have a stout run defense to go along with the league-best pass defense. Likewise, while the Seahawks lean heavily on running back Marshawn Lynch, the Broncos have a run defense every bit as stingy as the Seahawks.

The difference will be the Seahawks’ underutilized passing game against an average Broncos’ pass defense. Russell Wilson had the 7th-best quarterback rating among those with at least 300 attempts even though the Seahawks had the second-fewest pass attempts at 420.

The weather shouldn’t be too much of a factor. The latest forecast is for temperatures in the 40s and winds under 10 mph throughout the game, and a slight chance of rain throughout the day.

When all is said and done, the Seahawks will win 27-24.

Max Bialystock: Max Bialystock is launching himself into little old lady land.

The Producers 1967

One of the strangest things about the spectacle we call the Superbowl is the fuss about the ads.

It’s become a reason to watch a football game that more often than not isn’t that close and for people looking for a novelty to check it out.   (In fairness we’ve had in my opinion the best run of games in the history of the Superbowl the last this last decade).

Because of what the Superbowl draws companies spend a small fortune to have on in the hopes that their “Superbowl” ad will be the one that catapults their product to success. But are those 4 million dollar ads really worth it? A university decided to check it out:

A pair of University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire professors did a study of all 538 Super Bowl ads that aired between 2000 and 2009 and found that most of these Super Bowl ads don’t work.

But Forbes maintains they are still worthwhile, why, because of how they effect the stock price.

The real reason that companies are willing to invest in Super Bowl advertising is that despite the dubious results on sales, the announcement of buying airtime on the Super Bowl can bump up their stock price, at least in the short term. That surprising finding was gleaned in a study of publicly traded Super Bowl advertisers by researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder, which found that the stock price of these companies rose shortly after the media began to hype the ads’ upcoming appearance. They also found that any impact on stock prices occurs at the time of the announcement of the ad buy, rather than the day after the ad ran during the Super Bowl. This is partially the reason that companies announce their intentions to run ads weeks before the game, and run teasers on YouTube to hype their spots.

It sounds like the ultimate insider trading deal. Shareholders can make a profit selling shares the day a company hold announces a Superbowl ad deal because apparently there are plenty of idiots that think spending of millions of dollars in a single thirty second ad that is unlikely to work is a sign that a company is a good investment.

And here I had the quaint idea that you might buy stock in a company because they make a good product or provide that either has or should produce a profit for me as a shareholder.

If I was a con artist I’d pay good money for the list of those idiots.

Closing thought:  For the price of a 30 second Superbowl ad a company can have the top spot on DaTechGuy on DaRadio site and 4 minutes of ads every edition of DaTechGuy on DaRadio … for 363 years.

As I’m unlikely to live to 413 might I suggest a purchase 1/10 that size, I have an outside chance at least of making it to 86 or 87.