by baldilocks

Today, a friend of mine posted this Facebook exchange.

(I edited the names because I’m not interested in getting any of these people trolled – even the one who deserves it.)

Maneesh, as many may have surmised, is an American of Indian descent.

Sadly, this kind of response is common to those of us Americans with brown faces and non-European surnames. Ask me how I know.

Well, I’m glad you asked.

Actress Lupita Nyong’o–another famous member of the Luo tribe of Kenya. She’s not a Muslim.

Got it mostly when I tried to tell conservatives that the Luos of Kenya–my tribe and Obama’s alleged tribe–were 90% Christian and that the tribe was not an Arab tribe, nor a “slaver tribe” of all the rest of the tribes in the region; that was the prevalent Bravo Sierra.  Also, I received the Muslim-apologist treatment when I tried to tell people that Kenya’s 2008 Civil Conflict was not some sort of epic battle between Christianity and Islam, but a mundane tribal war. These notions have been the Fake News of nearly a decade.

Funny, none of the people who pontificated as Kenya experts back then give a rat’s furry backside about the country now.

I’ve had a long time to ponder the negative reactions of the very few of my fellow Americans to my name and my heritage. Most of it is fear of Islam. Justifiable, but people need to get a grip and stop pushing away fellow Americans who are allies and whose “funny names” are not an indication of their religious allegiance.

And here’s a notion that I don’t think I’ve ever put on screen. An online acquaintance who, quite correctly thinks that accusations of racism are overblown, wondered a few years ago which, if any, aspects of American slavery still affect Americans who are black in this century. I didn’t get the chance to answer then, but I’ll answer now: most black Americans have surnames of European origin. It’s so nearly universal that we don’t notice it anymore, not even me. Therefore, when some black chick named Ochieng pops up, it’s a curiosity and, sometimes it instills unconscious fear in those who are already afraid. Think this through.

All I know is that the Spirits of fear, violence, and tribalism are on the upswing in our country. I, however,  think it’s up to those of us who refuse to let those spirits master us to speak up, to understand, and, most of all, to pray without ceasing to the Lord of Hosts.

(Thanks to Christine)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel tentatively titled Arlen’s Harem, will be done one day soon! Follow her on Twitter and on Gab.ai.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

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HumanParasiteby baldilocks

It looks like our country isn’t the only one which is experiencing election insanity. From Philip Ochieng:

An ideology is any systematic set of religious or political ideals. Ideally, then, every political party should be identifiable by distinct ideological thought. But, if so, what is the ideological difference between Kenya’s ruling and opposition parties? Every thinking voter ought to pose that question concerning Kenya’s massive switching of parties every time the General Election looms.

Because the next such polls are nigh, Kenya’s politicians now dash from party to party. The political migration will reach its apogee upon party nominations, when certain candidates have failed to be licensed to vie for civic and parliamentary seats.

But if a party is a bastion of discrete ideals, how can pre-election “party-hopping” be the chief characteristic of Kenya’s alleged “multi-party democracy”?

The answer is that none of Kenya’s plethora of parties ­­­is a truly ideological movement. All our political associations are practically identical by their emptiness of social thought.

Father attributes this dearth to the idea that his countrymen

have adopted that language but do not bother to master its nuances that our moral and intellectual vacuity looks so much more spectacular than the Anglo-Saxon world’s.

In all former European colonies, we do not even know how to pretend about it. We vote not for the social beauty of ideas – not for ideologies – but for something else. To call a spade by its name, Kenya’s big tribes vote only for the presidential candidate identifiable with their cluster of tribes. It is a deeply embarrassing manifestation of our backwardness in social ideals.

Father shouldn’t be embarrassed. It’s what we’ve become here in this bastion of the Anglo-Saxon idealism for the last few elections. I imagine that things get lost in translation in the other former British colonies where English is not the first language spoken at home, but Americans don’t have that excuse.

Both sets of people—Kenyans and Americans–do have something else in common, however: few members of either set of citizens have been formally educated into understanding the importance of ideals—of principles. And I don’t know about the Kenyans, but I’ve been greatly surprised to find out that many, even most self-identified political conservatives, don’t really know what ideals/principles are. That isn’t an accident.

And, without ideals, what’s left? Tribalism of many varieties, but these are almost always of the ethnic type.

Like my father says, the politicians and the constituents in his country don’t even try to fake it. I’d say that we’ve come to that point in the USA as well.

Hang on! It’s going to be a bumpy election.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>>baldilocks

by baldilocksbaldilocks

Do you ever feel as though the world has become like the movie The Invasion of the Body Snatchers and that you are one of the few remaining unsnatched?

Just wondering.

Everything has become a litmus test for labelling. Everyone knows, just knows what you think about a topic because of their notions of how people like you think.

Last night, it was presumed that I would be on the side of those who believed that Tamir Rice was murdered and this morning it was presumed that I would be on the side of the police officers who killed him. Both of these presumptions were made using preconceived notions about what I believe. And both are wrong. But, as this is not my first rodeo, I have annoyed participants on both sides of an argument before. Sometimes, it’s fun, but not this time.

Here’s what I believe: sometimes, all available choices will bring anger and strife. Any choice that the Grand Jury made regarding the police officers in question would have caused an uproar. And Tamir Rice would still be dead, a victim of his own choices, the choices of the police, and, most importantly, the choices his parents made during the course of his all-too-short life. <<<See that? That’s my opinion regarding the things I do know.

This sounds like it’s about me, doesn’t it? Well, it’s not, except as I am a part of humanity.

Aside from the anger and the strife, was the Grand Jury decision grounded in truth? This is the only question that matters and I don’t know the answer to it because I don’t know enough about the case to come to a cogent conclusion.

You see how that works? If you know you don’t have all the facts, you say so. You don’t fall back on your ethnic and/or ideological “allegiances” to come to your conclusion and you don’t presume that the person with whom you are arguing is doing this, unless he/she outright says so.

It helps to ask good-faith questions.

But that sort of presumption has almost disappeared. Instead it’s “I know you think that yada yada blah because all you people think this way.”

Jesus the Christ prophesied that when we get close to the Last Days that “nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom.” The word ‘nation’ is a translation of the Greek word ethnos, a word that can also be translated as ‘race.’

Better, I think: tribe.

Tribal “thinking” plus its resultant tribal allegiance equals tribalism and I’m beginning to suspect that tribalism is based on ideology as well as ethnicity.

Here’s what tribalism is not based on: truth. And if we must all repair to our respective ethnically- and or ideologically-based tribal corners in order to come to predetermined conclusions about a dead boy and about those who killed him, then we all might as well give up talking now, wait for the next conflagration, and pray that it will not be the final one.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

by baldilocksbaldilocks

The bare bones of what you need to know about the topic of Ilya Somin’s op-ed at the Volokh Conspiracy are in the title. Somin goes on, however, to state what makes both crimes against police and crimes by police worse than those which don’t have police officer as perpetrator or victim.

There is a lot to chew on here, and at least one burnt straw man–but that last one is minor in relation to the point. And even with the horrible murders of NYPD officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, the following remains true.

When a civilian comes before a grand jury, he will almost always be indicted, even if he resembles the proverbial ham sandwich. By contrast, police accused of crimes on the job almost never get indicted, in part because they tend to get favorable treatment from prosecutors, as happened in both the Ferguson and Garner cases. While I think the officer in the Ferguson case probably should have been acquitted in a criminal trial due to the conflicting nature of the witness testimony, that does not change the reality that he got special treatment in the grand jury process that would not have been extended to a civilian suspect.

Such double standards create terrible incentives for police officers. As one former St. Louis police officer puts it, “[t]he problem is that cops aren’t held accountable for their actions, and they know it. These officers violate rights with impunity. They know there’s a different criminal justice system for civilians and police.” The vast majority of police officers do not engage in abusive violence. But, tragically, the system empowers and protects the minority who do.

Here’s the problem with civilians, police forces and Grand Juries: they are all made up of human beings, flawed since the action of Adam. Seems obvious, right? Well not to many of us. You see, we’ve all been inculcated with the notion that each individual is only as good as his tribe. If that notion isn’t overtly taught in schools, people learn it later in life through much more painful means. One of reasons that tribalism exists is to protect the individual from his/her mistakes. You are your tribe and your tribe is you. Right?

We are seeing two sets of tribalism–one ethnic, one professional–clash before our eyes (actually, there’s a third: legal). And until both parts of Somin’s title are commonplace, all involved will continue look to his/her tribe for protection…

…before they set themselves in array in preparation for war.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

Manson
Charles Manson, a failure when it came to ginning up racial war

by baldilocks

3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?

4 And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you.

5 For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many.

6 And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.

7 For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom: and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes, in divers places.

8 All these are the beginning of sorrows.

(‭Matthew‬ ‭24‬:‭3-8‬ KJV; emphasis mine)

Many readers of the Bible think of the political definition of the word nation–nation-state–when the word comes up, and forget or never learned that ‘nation’ also refers to ethnic groups and tribes. It also refers to what we think of as racial groups. Strong’s Concordance confirms this.

We all know that there would be no riots and that few black Americans would give a rat’s about the Ferguson shooting if Michael Brown had not been black or if Darren Wilson were black.

So we can conclude that the uproar about the decision of the Grand Jury has no relation to right and wrong, or to actual justice. It’s about tribalism– “my tribe, right or wrong.”

Social “justice” is the issue here–a primary tenet of Leftism. Leftism’s primary root is division.

Back in the Bible day, before the redemptive action of Christ, it went like this: an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth; the sins of the father are visited upon the son, down to ten generations. In other words, you always had to pay for your actions and so did your children. And this is the law to which those black people who are still angry about American slavery want to subscribe–even some of those who say they are Christians.

So when we–any of us–subscribe to tribalism, here’s what we are doing, basically: we are denying the Redemption of Christ, and we are becoming a part of His prophecy in Matthew 24, a prophecy which is not meant for Christians (my opinion).

Those who do this and who are up front about not being Christians are more honest…and they will have less to answer for when they have a face-to-face with God.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going! 

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

Baldilocks mini