Last week I checking my traffic which has been very good for March, and for the fun of it looked at the countries where the traffic has been from this year.

So far in North American Cuba and Iceland have had no interest (although perhaps by this time my WBC post might change that.  In South America French Guiana, Suriname and the Falkland Islands are out.  In Europe only Albania hasn’t stopped by while in both Asia and Africa a dozen or more countries have not found the site worth their time.

Then for the fun of it I checked my all time stats and the Numbers changed dramatically

Only eight countries in the world have thus far decided that DaTechGuy blog isn’t worth their time.

One of them North Korea I’m figuring is a lost cause, given the amount of electric use the only way I’m going to get any traffic from there is if the Un family decides to take an interest which might be dangerous.

As for the others, I think there’s a shot so, in the interest of getting the rest of the map filled here is the oddest clickbait post you’ve ever seen.

Boko Haram in Chad:

Initially, Boko Haram’s presence on the Chadian side of the lake was limited. But violence rapidly escalated in 2015, partly in reaction to the intervention by Chadian forces in neighbouring states. Two suicide bombings in the capital N’Djamena and multiple attacks on villages and army posts followed. Attacks diminished at the start of 2016, having never reached the levels seen in Nigeria, Cameroon and Niger. This was accompanied by a wave of surrenders of Boko Haram members in the second half of the year, but which seemingly included few if any of the hard core.

It’s a real issue and a big problem

The Seed vault of Svalbard:

Submerged within the bowels of rock and frozen earth on an island between Norway and the North Pole lies a new state-of-the-art agricultural marvel: The Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Here, millions of food crop seeds from nearly every country in the world have been meticulously packaged, cataloged and tucked away.

The vault is kept at a low moisture level and minus 18 degrees C, optimal conditions to keep seeds viable for decades, centuries or indefinitely. And even if the electricity should fail, the surrounding rock and permafrost will keep the seeds frozen. Although the vault has not yet received its full capacity of 4.5 million varieties, it already houses the most diverse stockpile of food crop seeds anywhere.

I wonder who thought of doing this in the northern most inhabited island in the world?

The occupation of Western Sahara by Morocco continues

Morocco left the Organization of African Unity (OAU), precursor to the AU, in 1984 after the OAU recognised the right to self-determination and independence for the people of the Western Sahara, who have been occupied by Morocco since the 1970s.

The OAU granted membership to the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR), proclaimed in 1976 by the Sahrawi people’s Polisario Front in a declaration of independence rejected by Morocco. The decision was in keeping with the OAU principle not to recognise the occupation of any part of the continent. While the SADR claimed sovereignty over Western Sahara, Morocco saw it as an integral part of its own territory.

Rather than accept the SADR’s independence, Morocco left the OAU. Since then Morocco has refused to join the AU unless the group withdraws the SADR’s membership.

But Morocco’s King Mohammad has the money and when it came to rejoining the Organization of African Unity their money talked.

Action on the abuse by UN peacekeepers in the Central African Republic:

Guterres pledged the UN will appoint a human rights expert, tasked with advocating for victim’s rights, to serve in his office and report to him. His new plan also asks UN peacekeeping missions in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, and South Sudan – all countries where peacekeepers have been accused of raping women under their protection – to appoint victims’ rights advocates on the ground. These local advocates, together with the high-level attention of an expert in Guterres’ office, could finally prompt accountability for abusers and support for victims.

Human Rights Watch research in the Central African Republic shows the lack of support or access to justice victims of sexual exploitation have when peacekeepers are the victimizers. This was echoed in the UN’s own assessment: “very few victims have been assisted due to lack of dedicated funding and the slow enforcement process.”

Under the new plan, the UN will bolster a Trust Fund for Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse. This fund was set up last year but has only collected US$436,000 from five member countries: Bhutan, Cyprus, India, Japan, and Norway. It needs more support. Guterres has suggested boosting the trust fund by withholding funds for troop-contributing countries that don’t investigate allegations of abuse by their troops, then transferring that money to victims.

This is another story of abuse of women that for some reason doesn’t draw a lot of attention from western feminists as that would involve critique of the UN rather than the US or the west in general.

China’s base in Djibouti is nearly complete

The military base that China is building in Djibouti will be completed “later this summer”, General Thomas Waldhauser, the commander of the US military’s Africa Command, told the Senate Armed Services Committee on 9 March.

Noting the proximity of the Chinese base to the US military’s Camp Lemonnier, Gen Waldhauser said he was concerned about operational security. “I’ve talked to their [Djibouti’s] president and expressed our concerns about some of the things that are important to us about what the Chinese should not do at that location.”

This is a story of international importance, that it has gotten so little attention is pretty odd.

The big news out of Turkmenistan is the state visit of the president of Uzbekistan:

Mirziyoyev and his Turkmen counterpart, Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, inked an agreement on economic cooperation in 2018-2020 and a memorandum of understanding on the need to develop railway infrastructure, among other documents.

Turning from word to deed, the two leaders traveled to the northeastern Lebap province on March 7 to attend the ceremonial inauguration of the 1.75 kilometer Turkmenabat-Farap railway and road bridge, which straddles the Amu-Dary River and could conceivably enable greater cross-border traffic. Until now, trains crossing the river coursing along Turkmenistan’s side of the border did so using a bridge built in 1901.

It was his first state visit as leader so it’s a bit of a big deal that Turkmenistan was the destination

and finally things are heating up between the Falkland Islands and Argentina again:

The letter added: “We take this opportunity to remind you of our fundamental right to self-determination, as enshrined in the UN Charter, and of the 35 years of attempts by the Government of Argentina to ignore our rights as a people and undermine our way of life.

“In recognising the universal rights of all people, we welcome you in visiting our home, to see for yourselves our community and our heritage born of nine generations.

“During your visit here, the Falkland Islands Government would like to invite you to a briefing on our modern, independent, well-governed, sustainable and thriving country, so that you can further your understanding of our citizens and way of life.”

The letter added comes as an Argentinian delegation comes to visit on a fact-finding mission related to the war.

I doubt that this post will draw thousands or even hundreds of hits, but if I manage seven, one from each of the countries listed that will do.