Time to put Greenpeace vandals out of business UPDATED with before & after photos

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Time to put Greenpeace vandals out of business UPDATED with before & after photos

Note: This is a rant. Pro­ceed accordingly.

Back in my much younger, stu­pider days, I sent Green­peace a check for $25 of my hard-​earned bucks. That was a cou­ple of decades ago.

Yes, I recy­cle; yes, I don’t waste water or elec­tric­ity; yes, I owned a house in a lot that had two dozen trees (which prob­a­bly more than made up for what­ever fumes the house may have gen­er­ated), and their leaves and branches were mulched. So much for being “green.”

Van­dal­ism is a crime.

Some van­dal­ism is a mis­de­meanor. Toilet-​paper a neighbor’s tree on mis­chief night, get caught, and you’ll find out what the word means.

Green­peace, how­ever, has engaged in felonies for the sake of pub­lic­ity for years.

No, I don’t buy their “sus­tain­abil­ity”, “renewa­bil­ity” excuses.

Green­peace, in these days of moral equiv­a­lence, through their ends-​justify-​our-​means meth­ods, are descend­ing to the lev­els of the Taliban.

To wit:
Back in 2001, the Tal­iban destroyed two ancient Bud­dhas at Bamiyan in Afghanistan, a World Her­itage Site. The stat­ues were over 1,500 years old:

Despite world-​wide con­dem­na­tion, the Tal­iban lined the stat­ues with explo­sives and blew them up in the spring of 2001 because they con­sid­ered them idols, and thus un-​Islamic.

Fast-​forward to this week in Peru, where Green­peace van­dals decided to post some graf­fiti at the Nazca Lines World Her­itage Site,

The Nazca lines are huge fig­ures depict­ing liv­ing crea­tures, stylised plants and imag­i­nary fig­ures scratched on the sur­face of the ground between 1,500 and 2,000 years ago. They are believed to have had rit­ual func­tions related to astronomy.

Take a look:

The let­ters are made of some kind of yel­low mate­r­ial and were car­ried there on foot, and held down by rocks,

The dam­age caused by Greenpeace’s van­dal­ism is ines­timable,

The ground around the site is so sen­si­tive and so sacred that Peru has even for­bid­den pres­i­dents and top offi­cials to walk where the Green­peace activists went. Peru’s Deputy Cul­ture Min­is­tertold the BBC: “You walk there, and the foot­print is going to last hun­dreds or thou­sands of years.” Tourists gen­er­ally get to see the site from the air, or, on rare occa­sions, are equipped with spe­cial foot gear.

They are absolutely frag­ile. They are black rocks on a white back­ground. You walk there and the foot­print is going to last hun­dreds or thou­sands of years,” said the min­is­ter. “And the line that they have destroyed is the most vis­i­ble and most rec­og­nized of all.”

Mind you, any­one even think­ing of going to the Nazca site knows you can’t walk on it. Green­peace will­fully engaged in inflict­ing irrepara­ble dam­age. In their breath­tak­ing arro­gance to say “the future is renew­able”, they can’t see that the past is not.

What did Peru and mankind do to deserve this, in Greenpeace’s eyes?

The mes­sage was intended for del­e­gates from 190 coun­tries at the UN cli­mate talks being held in Lima.

Sue Green­peace out of busi­ness in coun­tries where you can actu­ally enforce the judge­ment; ban their activites as ter­ror­ism; iden­tify the per­pe­tra­tors and put them in jail.

Enough. It’s time for change: put Green­peace out of business.

UPDATE:
Before Greenpeace:

After Green­peace:

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

Note: This is a rant. Proceed accordingly.

Back in my much younger, stupider days, I sent Greenpeace a check for $25 of my hard-earned bucks. That was a couple of decades ago.

Yes, I recycle; yes, I don’t waste water or electricity; yes, I owned a house in a lot that had two dozen trees (which probably more than made up for whatever fumes the house may have generated), and their leaves and branches were mulched. So much for being “green.”

Vandalism is a crime.

Some vandalism is a misdemeanor. Toilet-paper a neighbor’s tree on mischief night, get caught, and you’ll find out what the word means.

Greenpeace, however, has engaged in felonies for the sake of publicity for years.

No, I don’t buy their “sustainability”, “renewability” excuses.

Greenpeace, in these days of moral equivalence, through their ends-justify-our-means methods, are descending to the levels of the Taliban.

To wit:
Back in 2001, the Taliban destroyed two ancient Buddhas at Bamiyan in Afghanistan, a World Heritage Site. The statues were over 1,500 years old:

Despite world-wide condemnation, the Taliban lined the statues with explosives and blew them up in the spring of 2001 because they considered them idols, and thus un-Islamic.

Fast-forward to this week in Peru, where Greenpeace vandals decided to post some graffiti at the Nazca Lines World Heritage Site,

The Nazca lines are huge figures depicting living creatures, stylised plants and imaginary figures scratched on the surface of the ground between 1,500 and 2,000 years ago. They are believed to have had ritual functions related to astronomy.

Take a look:

The letters are made of some kind of yellow material and were carried there on foot, and held down by rocks,

The damage caused by Greenpeace’s vandalism is inestimable,

The ground around the site is so sensitive and so sacred that Peru has even forbidden presidents and top officials to walk where the Greenpeace activists went. Peru’s Deputy Culture Ministertold the BBC: “You walk there, and the footprint is going to last hundreds or thousands of years.” Tourists generally get to see the site from the air, or, on rare occasions, are equipped with special foot gear.

“They are absolutely fragile. They are black rocks on a white background. You walk there and the footprint is going to last hundreds or thousands of years,” said the minister. “And the line that they have destroyed is the most visible and most recognized of all.”

Mind you, anyone even thinking of going to the Nazca site knows you can’t walk on it. Greenpeace willfully engaged in inflicting irreparable damage. In their breathtaking arrogance to say “the future is renewable”, they can’t see that the past is not.

What did Peru and mankind do to deserve this, in Greenpeace’s eyes?

The message was intended for delegates from 190 countries at the UN climate talks being held in Lima.

Sue Greenpeace out of business in countries where you can actually enforce the judgement; ban their activites as terrorism; identify the perpetrators and put them in jail.

Enough. It’s time for change: put Greenpeace out of business.

UPDATE:
Before Greenpeace:

After Greenpeace:

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.