Recommended reading for Easter: The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes

Readability

Recommended reading for Easter: The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes

Cot­ton­tail, mother of twenty-​one lit­tle boy and girl bun­nies, holds life-​long dreams of becom­ing an Easter Bunny.

Why, you may ask, a children’s book writ­ten in 1939 by a proper Charleston­ian named DuBose Hay­ward, mat­ter to us, jaded denizens of the 21st Century?

Because it is a pow­er­ful book.

DuBose Hey­ward (18851940) wrote sev­eral books, includ­ing the acclaimed novel Porgy,

the first major south­ern novel to por­tray blacks with­out con­de­scen­sion. Just a decade later George Gersh­win had trans­formed Heyward’s book into an opera that would become one of the most endur­ing mas­ter­works of Amer­i­can music.

Undoubt­edly, Porgy and Bess is pow­er­ful art, but what makes The Coun­try Bunny and the Lit­tle Gold Shoes pow­er­ful is the strength of its main char­ac­ter: A good mother who stays true to her core val­ues of becom­ing “wise, kind, and brave!”, for all five Easter Bun­nies (did you know there are five?)

must be the five kind­est, and swiftest, and wis­est bun­nies in the whole world.

Lit­tle Mother Cot­ton­tail works hard and does her best as she takes pride in her work. No false self-​esteem here, since she believes in results and achieve­ment. She believes in her­self and keeps a pos­i­tive atti­tude. She focuses on keep­ing up with her every­day work (much like her cre­ator, who kept his day job); Duty is fore­most for her:

Cot­ton­tail stopped think­ing about hop­ping over the world with lovely eggs for lit­tle boys and girls, and she took care of her babies.

She val­ues the love of her fam­ily. She ignores the jackrab­bits, the snobs and the naysayers.

And she rises to the challenge.

Some view it as a fem­i­nist fable, but it’s more than that. It’s a book about values.

I only read The Coun­try Bunny and the Lit­tle Gold Shoes recently, after a friend rec­om­mended it. It’s funny, the prose is per­fect, and you will cry, and laugh. The illus­tra­tions by Mar­jory Flack are beau­ti­ful, charm­ing, mem­o­rable and funny. It also comes with a book­plate, “For some­one wise, and kind, and brave,” per­fect for giv­ing as a gift.

Good lit­er­a­ture is when it goes beyond the printed word to exalt the bet­ter parts of our human souls. The Coun­try Bunny and the Lit­tle Gold Shoes is great literature.

Order yours now so you’ll have it by Easter.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog. She bought the 70th anniver­sary edi­tion with the shoe charm.

Cottontail, mother of twenty-one little boy and girl bunnies, holds life-long dreams of becoming an Easter Bunny.

Why, you may ask, a children’s book written in 1939 by a proper Charlestonian named DuBose Hayward, matter to us, jaded denizens of the 21st Century?

Because it is a powerful book.

DuBose Heyward (1885-1940) wrote several books, including the acclaimed novel Porgy,

the first major southern novel to portray blacks without condescension. Just a decade later George Gershwin had transformed Heyward’s book into an opera that would become one of the most enduring masterworks of American music.

Undoubtedly, Porgy and Bess is powerful art, but what makes The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes powerful is the strength of its main character: A good mother who stays true to her core values of becoming “wise, kind, and brave!”, for all five Easter Bunnies (did you know there are five?)

must be the five kindest, and swiftest, and wisest bunnies in the whole world.

Little Mother Cottontail works hard and does her best as she takes pride in her work. No false self-esteem here, since she believes in results and achievement. She believes in herself and keeps a positive attitude. She focuses on keeping up with her everyday work (much like her creator, who kept his day job); Duty is foremost for her:

Cottontail stopped thinking about hopping over the world with lovely eggs for little boys and girls, and she took care of her babies.

She values the love of her family. She ignores the jackrabbits, the snobs and the naysayers.

And she rises to the challenge.

Some view it as a feminist fable, but it’s more than that. It’s a book about values.

I only read The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes recently, after a friend recommended it. It’s funny, the prose is perfect, and you will cry, and laugh. The illustrations by Marjory Flack are beautiful, charming, memorable and funny. It also comes with a bookplate, “For someone wise, and kind, and brave,” perfect for giving as a gift.

Good literature is when it goes beyond the printed word to exalt the better parts of our human souls. The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes is great literature.

Order yours now so you’ll have it by Easter.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog. She bought the 70th anniversary edition with the shoe charm.