Hyde Amendment turns 40, much to Clinton’s annoyance

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Hyde Amendment turns 40, much to Clinton's annoyance

Not long after Roe v. Wade fed­er­al­ized abor­tion pol­icy, Mem­bers of Con­gress led by Henry Hyde moved to pre­vent fed­eral funds from being used for abor­tions. The Hyde Amend­ment was finally added to the Med­ic­aid pro­gram as a rider to the Health and Human Ser­vices bud­get on Sep­tem­ber 30, 1976. The rider has been added in every fed­eral bud­get cycle since then. The Hyde Amend­ment restricts — but does not alto­gether pre­vent — fed­eral tax­payer fund­ing of abortion.

Abor­tion providers have tried to tor­pedo the Hyde Amend­ment since the day it was pro­posed. Pres­i­den­tial can­di­date Hillary Clin­ton is a deter­mined foe of Hyde. Slate quotes her as say­ing that it “mak[es] it harder for low-​income women to exer­cise their full rights.” Clin­ton and can­di­dates in step with her are pre­pared to coerce all tax­pay­ers into sub­si­diz­ing abortion.

Don­ald Trump is report­edly will­ing to sup­port the Hyde Amend­ment, accord­ing to Mar­jorie Dan­nen­felser, chair­woman of Trump’s pro-​life coali­tion. “Not only has Mr. Trump dou­bled down on his three exist­ing com­mit­ments to the pro-​life move­ment, he has gone a step fur­ther in pledg­ing to pro­tect the Hyde Amend­ment and the con­science rights of mil­lions of pro-​life taxpayers.”

Absent a pres­i­den­tial veto, it’s the Mem­bers of Con­gress who deter­mine whether the Hyde Amend­ment goes into the bud­get. A pres­i­den­tial candidate’s coat­tails will have some­thing to do with the makeup of Con­gress, though, so the views of the pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates matter.

As the Hyde Amend­ment turns 40, and act­ing inde­pen­dently of any cam­paign or party, a diverse group of pro-​life Amer­i­cans led by Sec­u­lar Pro-​Life has launched the #Hel­loHyde cam­paign. #Hel­loHyde not only marks the anniver­sary of the Hyde Amend­ment, but also cel­e­brates the lives of chil­dren born under Med­ic­aid since the amend­ment was first used. The #Hel­loHyde cam­paign­ers want the Hyde Amend­ment to be not only pro­tected but broadened.

More power to them. From the campaign’s web site:

Med­ic­aid should cover birth, not death.…

The Hyde Amendment’s life-​saving impact is hard to over­state. Both sup­port­ers and oppo­nents agree that the Hyde Amend­ment has pre­vented over a mil­lion abor­tions. The dis­agree­ment, sad to say, is over whether that’s a good thing.

#Hel­loHyde esti­mates that of the peo­ple born through the Med­ic­aid pro­gram since the Hyde Amend­ment was enacted (“Med­ic­aid kids”), 1 in 9 would have died in the absence of Hyde Amend­ment pro­tec­tion. That esti­mate comes from a recently released report by the Char­lotte Lozier Insti­tute, which found that the Hyde Amend­ment has saved 2.13 mil­lion lives.

The #Hel­loHyde web site includes pho­tos of some of the Med­ic­aid kids. I hope oppo­nents of the Hyde Amend­ment see those pho­tos, which might pro­voke some thought about which of those kids ought to have been killed at pub­lic expense.

Not long after Roe v. Wade federalized abortion policy, Members of Congress led by Henry Hyde moved to prevent federal funds from being used for abortions. The Hyde Amendment was finally added to the Medicaid program as a rider to the Health and Human Services budget on September 30, 1976. The rider has been added in every federal budget cycle since then. The Hyde Amendment restricts – but does not altogether prevent – federal taxpayer funding of abortion.

Abortion providers have tried to torpedo the Hyde Amendment since the day it was proposed. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is a determined foe of Hyde. Slate quotes her as saying that it “mak[es] it harder for low-income women to exercise their full rights.” Clinton and candidates in step with her are prepared to coerce all taxpayers into subsidizing abortion.

Donald Trump is reportedly willing to support the Hyde Amendment, according to Marjorie Dannenfelser, chairwoman of Trump’s pro-life coalition. “Not only has Mr. Trump doubled down on his three existing commitments to the pro-life movement, he has gone a step further in pledging to protect the Hyde Amendment and the conscience rights of millions of pro-life taxpayers.”

Absent a presidential veto, it’s the Members of Congress who determine whether the Hyde Amendment goes into the budget. A presidential candidate’s coattails will have something to do with the makeup of Congress, though, so the views of the presidential candidates matter.

As the Hyde Amendment turns 40, and acting independently of any campaign or party, a diverse group of pro-life Americans led by Secular Pro-Life has launched the #HelloHyde campaign. #HelloHyde not only marks the anniversary of the Hyde Amendment, but also celebrates the lives of children born under Medicaid since the amendment was first used. The #HelloHyde campaigners want the Hyde Amendment to be not only protected but broadened.

More power to them. From the campaign’s web site:

Medicaid should cover birth, not death….

The Hyde Amendment’s life-saving impact is hard to overstate. Both supporters and opponents agree that the Hyde Amendment has prevented over a million abortions. The disagreement, sad to say, is over whether that’s a good thing.

#HelloHyde estimates that of the people born through the Medicaid program since the Hyde Amendment was enacted (“Medicaid kids”), 1 in 9 would have died in the absence of Hyde Amendment protection. That estimate comes from a recently released report by the Charlotte Lozier Institute, which found that the Hyde Amendment has saved 2.13 million lives.

The #HelloHyde web site includes photos of  some of the Medicaid kids. I hope opponents of the Hyde Amendment see those photos, which might provoke some thought about which of those kids ought to have been killed at public expense.