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Jihad gets around

Almost exactly two years ago, on Decem­ber 7, 2014, the Defense Depart­ment announced that it had trans­ferred six Guan­tanamo detainees to Uruguay, after then-​president José Mujica agreed to take them for human­i­tar­ian reasons.

Thomas Josce­lyn described the group:

The four Syr­i­ans trans­ferred — Ahmed Adnan Ahjam, Ali Husein Shaa­ban, Abd al Hadi Omar Mah­moud Faraj, and Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab — were all allegedly mem­bers of the so-​called “Syr­ian Group.” The JTF-​GTMO files describe the “Syr­ian Group” as “com­prised of dis­man­tled ter­ror­ist cells that escaped Syr­ian author­i­ties and fled to Afghanistan (AF) in 2000.”

For the past two years I’ve been fol­low­ing the story of the Gitmo alumni in Uruguay. They have refused to learn the lan­guage or to take job offers, and have been reported to the author­i­ties for domes­tic vio­lence after being reunited with their families.

Yes, Uruguay also brought in some 4245 mem­bers of five fam­i­lies of the detainees.

The fam­ily of Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab , how­ever, refuses to travel to Uruguay and insists on stay­ing in Turkey. Turkey doesn’t want to take Jihad.

Josce­lyn describes Jihad’s back­ground,

as a “doc­u­ment forger who pro­vided ser­vices to the net­work oper­ated by” Abu Zubay­dah, “sup­port­ing Euro­pean, North African, and Lev­ant extrem­ists” by “facil­i­tat­ing their inter­na­tional travels.”as a “doc­u­ment forger who pro­vided ser­vices to the net­work oper­ated by” Abu Zubay­dah, “sup­port­ing Euro­pean, North African, and Lev­ant extrem­ists” by “facil­i­tat­ing their inter­na­tional travels.”

And travel he has.

Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Wa’el Dhiab, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmad Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Wael Dihab, a.k.a. Jihad Diyab, after being relo­cated to Uruguay vis­ited Argentina last Feb­ru­ary, and declared him­self “ready to fight“, just the thing to say when you want to make your­self wel­come to a for­eign coun­try and your first name is Jihad.

After that, Diyab tried to enter Brazil three times but was turned away at the bor­der. Author­i­ties lost track of him, much to the alarm of the Brazil­ian author­i­ties, who were prepar­ing for the Sum­mer Olympics. After a man­hunt in six coun­tries, he turned up in Venezuela, 4,600 miles away from Mon­te­v­ideo (a lit­tle under the dis­tance from New York to Moscow), where he tried to peti­tion the Uruguayan con­sulate – which he could do in Mon­te­v­ideo – to “ask for assis­tance to fly to Turkey or some other coun­try to be reunited with his family.”

As the Wall Street Jour­nal pointed out (empha­sis added),

Mr. Dhiab’s travel plans may raise addi­tional con­cern, given Turkey’s porous bor­der with Syria and its use as an entry point for vol­un­teers look­ing to join Islamic State.

The Venezue­lans put him on a plane and he was returned to Uruguay where he went on hunger strike.

Last week the Uruguayans tried to send him to South Africa. South Africa turned him away at the air­port. He’s back in Uruguay.

The Obama admin­is­tra­tion announced two days ago that it Intends to Trans­fer 17 or 18 Guan­tá­namo Detainees to Italy, Oman, Saudi Ara­bia and the United Arab Emirates.

Good luck with that.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­ica at Fausta’s blog.

Almost exactly two years ago, on December 7, 2014, the Defense Department announced that it had transferred six Guantanamo detainees to Uruguay, after then-president José Mujica agreed to take them for humanitarian reasons.

Thomas Joscelyn described the group:

The four Syrians transferred — Ahmed Adnan Ahjam, Ali Husein Shaaban, Abd al Hadi Omar Mahmoud Faraj, and Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab — were all allegedly members of the so-called “Syrian Group.” The JTF-GTMO files describe the “Syrian Group” as “comprised of dismantled terrorist cells that escaped Syrian authorities and fled to Afghanistan (AF) in 2000.”

For the past two years I’ve been following the story of the Gitmo alumni in Uruguay. They have refused to learn the language or to take job offers, and have been reported to the authorities for domestic violence after being reunited with their families.

Yes, Uruguay also brought in some 42-45 members of five families of the detainees.

The family of Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab , however, refuses to travel to Uruguay and insists on staying in Turkey. Turkey doesn’t want to take Jihad.

Joscelyn describes Jihad’s background,

as a “document forger who provided services to the network operated by” Abu Zubaydah, “supporting European, North African, and Levant extremists” by “facilitating their international travels.”as a “document forger who provided services to the network operated by” Abu Zubaydah, “supporting European, North African, and Levant extremists” by “facilitating their international travels.”

And travel he has.

Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Wa’el Dhiab, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmad Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Wael Dihab,  a.k.a. Jihad Diyab, after being relocated to Uruguay visited Argentina last February, and declared himself  “ready to fight“, just the thing to say when you want to make yourself welcome to a foreign country and your first name is Jihad.

After that, Diyab tried to enter Brazil three times but was turned away at the border. Authorities lost track of him, much to the alarm of the Brazilian authorities, who were preparing for the Summer Olympics. After a manhunt in six countries, he turned up in Venezuela, 4,600 miles away from Montevideo (a little under the distance from New York to Moscow), where he tried to petition the Uruguayan consulate – which he could do in Montevideo – to “ask for assistance to fly to Turkey or some other country to be reunited with his family.”

As the Wall Street Journal pointed out (emphasis added),

Mr. Dhiab’s travel plans may raise additional concern, given Turkey’s porous border with Syria and its use as an entry point for volunteers looking to join Islamic State.

The Venezuelans put him on a plane and he was returned to Uruguay where he went on hunger strike.

Last week the Uruguayans tried to send him to South Africa. South Africa turned him away at the airport. He’s back in Uruguay.

The Obama administration announced two days ago that it Intends to Transfer 17 or 18 Guantánamo Detainees to Italy, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Good luck with that.

Fausta Rodríguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin America at Fausta’s blog.