Baseball and Game-Playing

Boston Red Sox 2018 World Series Championship ring that I’m sure Peter likes seeing again.

by baldilocks

Yesterday, a goodly portion of the Washington Nationals visited the White House in celebration of their victory in the 2019 World Series and at least two of the players were pummeled on Twitter for openly being fans of President Trump. I’m sure the two players will console themselves with that beautiful ring they get to wear.

In contrast, there were several players who skipped the White House visit. I didn’t notice much talk about them. But, of course it was their choice to make.

It’s a safe bet, however, that the latter received a digital pat on the back from the usual suspects. We know that it’s a safe bet because we have some comparative information

[R]etired Boston Bruins goaltender Tim Thomas and New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady turned down Obama’s invitation to come to the White House and were met with strong criticism from media.

Thomas’s decision not to visit the White House in 2012 was widely criticized. U.S. News & World Report writer Susan Milligan headlined a story on the incident that said his decision was not brave, “it was just rude.” ESPN writer Joe McDonald wrote that Thomas chose to put himself above the team through his decision not to attend.

“When the president of the United States invites you and all your teammates to the White House to honor your Stanley Cup championship, you go and represent the team,” McDonald wrote.

Emphasis mine.

Hahahahahahaha!

Of course, we know that this only applies when the president is a Democrat and it double applied in the lone case in which the president was of African descent.

And then there is a whole other category of rules for Orange Man Bad.

If I were a team owner, I’d make it mandatory (in the contract) for all players and coaches to attend a White House gathering in the wake of a championship victory – unless there’s a life or death emergency — regardless of who the president is. That or get fined/traded.

But I guess that’s why I’m just a broke blogger.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

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Forty years later: the media and the Iran hostage crisis

Forty years ago this week, I traveled to Iran to cover the takeover of the U.S. embassy, an event that embarrassed the United States and the administration of Jimmy Carter.

What isn’t debated on this anniversary is how badly I and the rest of the news media reported what happened.

First, the hostage-takers weren’t “students,” the moniker that still sticks today. A.J. Caschetta, a lecturer at the Rochester Institute of Technology, provides some interesting background.

For example, author Tim Wells interviewed most of the hostages for his oral history, 444 Days: The Hostages Remember (1985). Few called their captors “students,” using various terms: Iraniansradicalsmilitantsterroristsgoonsguardsknuckleheads, turkeys, and assholes.

One of the key leaders of the hostage-takers was Hossein Sheikholeslam, who convened press conferences for the legions of international journalists that flocked to Tehran. But he hadn’t been a student since the early 1970s when he attended the University of California at Berkeley. His proficiency in English also made him suitable to interrogate the hostages. Sheikholeslam “may have been trained in interrogation techniques,” wrote William Daugherty, one of only four CIA officers stationed at the embassy on November 4.

Another ringleader, Mohammad Hashemi, wasn’t a student. He spent his time with friends forming a group called “Muslim Students Following the Imam’s Line,” which gave orders to those who showed up to protest outside the U.S. embassy. They wore laminated photos of Khomeini around their necks and pinned to their jackets.

The hostage-takers “strictly allied with Khomeini and the new mullah establishment,” according to Mark Bowden in Guests of the Ayatollah (2006). As Bowden puts it, they “were all committed to a formal Islamic state and were allied, some of them by family, with the clerical power structure around Khomeini.”

Second, the news media didn’t understand how big the story would become. The foreign editor of Newsweek, where I worked, told me the takeover wouldn’t last more than a day or so. It went on for 444 days!

Newsweek didn’t put the story on the cover until three weeks after the takeover occurred and then only as a part of an overall analysis of the burning of the U.S. embassy in Libya, the Russian influence in the Afghanistan government, and Islamists taking over Mecca.

The U.S. television networks were so unprepared that only one ABC News radio reporter had a valid visa to get into Iran. As a result, ABC had exclusive coverage for several days, laying the groundwork for “America Held Hostage” and then Nightline.

Third, many journalists thought the religious government of Iran had to be better than the Shah. How wrong we were!

I will now say an act of contrition. I hope other reporters do the same. 

Net Rules, Hill Photo Blues, Beto bye Bye, Kamala Conventional Wisdom & McDonald’s Unconventional One, Under the Fedora

There is only one thing that amazes me about the Katie Hill story. It’s the idea that she really believed that she could have nudes on the net and that nobody would notice.

Now I grant you, if she just thought nobody would care, she might have gotten away with it, but the concept that it would stay quiet is just silly.

Never forget that the internet is forever and anyone who tells you otherwise is a fool.


It’s been really funny watching the media try to spin Rep Hill’s resignation as a GOP hit job as if the party made her pose for those pictures and put them on the net. They forget that while folks in the bubble still might buy it, the actual story and the pictures are only a click away and that the sole narrative is no longer theirs.

I would have thought Matt Drudge would have taught them that decades ago but they’ve never gotten over it.


There are a lot of people who are laughing about Beto departure from the Presidential race, I’m not.

First of all Beto was extremely useful in that he said aloud the thing we all know and the left didn’t want said. With him out the left/media will do their best to pretend that others do not think like he does and such questions will not be in the debate. With him in the race that wasn’t possible.

But most important of all in the end every single democrat running for the nomination is going to lose except for one, so until it’s down to 3 or 4 candidate, the individual failures don’t mean a thing. So I don’t get excited about it, with one exception…


…that exception is Kamila Harris. Watching her fail has been an absolute pleasure, not just because she is a huge phony who slept her way to the top, but because she is the perfect illustration of the truth about conventional wisdom.

For a very long time everyone who “mattered” told us that Kamila Harris was the future and a lock for the nomination. the day she was elected it was considered Presidential prep. Her folding like a cheap suit demonstrates that conventional wisdom is always correct…right up until the moment that it’s not.


Finally speaking of the conventional wisdom, I began this piece at a McDonalds speaking with some elderly gentlemen when the manager going home came by to say hi. I struck up a conversation with him and discoveered two things I didn’t know.

  1. A slice of cheese costs them .32 when you factor in all the assorted costs.
  2. The Kiosks have led to him INCREASING rather than decreasing his staff.

That 1st fact wasn’t a big surprise but the 2nd really threw me off, I asked the manager why?

He said 1st of all we needed someone to service the tables because the Kisoks require delivery to the table and second of all the Kiosks, along with the various delivery services, increased business and orders to the point where they needed those extra folks for the cooking etc.

Now I don’t know if this is peculiar to the local McDonalds or not but I think it would be worth finding out, but assuming the manager is not blowing smoke I’d say it’s worth finding out on a larger scale.