When a bomb is about to explode in your neighborhood do you call the ACLU, Antifa, or Black Lives Matter?

Broadway in Nashville in 2018. AT&T Building in background.

By John Ruberry

The defund the police looks pretty irrelevant now. As you know on Christmas morning an explosives-laded recreational vehicle devestated a business district in downtown Nashville.

“This vehicle has a bomb, if you can hear this message, you need to evacuate” was the loop recording that played before the bomb detonated at sunrise in Music City.

Someone, or more likely more than one person, called not Black Lives Matter, Antifa (true, I don’t believe they have a listed phone number), or the ACLU–all of them who are proponents of the defund the police movement–about the warning. Instead the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department was called.

And six MNPD police officers cleared the area, most likely minimizing injuries and possibly fatalities. These hero cops appear to be pretty young, they may have had children at home. They were on the streets on the one day when most people don’t want to work.

There are a couple of theories on what motivated the bomber–or bombers. I’ve been to Nashville and 2nd Avenue, where the explosion happened, is just a block from the popular and generally crowded entertainment and bar district on Broadway. If human carnage was the goal then Christmas Eve around sunset would have been a much better time for that. Or last night, the day after Christmas. One theory is that the recording was meant to frighten away pedestrians and residents so there would only be cops on 2nd Avenue when the bomb went off. Another hypothesis is that because the rigged RV was parked adjacent to the AT&T Building, the explosion was the work of anti-5G paranoids. AT&T mobile and internet service in Nasvhille has been severely disrupted by the bombing, as has 911 service as far away as Kentucky.

As for the first theory, when that RV exploded that would mean only cops would be killed. Back to the Nashville hero police officers: These six appear to be ordinary beat cops, not specialists that you’ll find on the bomb squad. All but one, the sergeant, have been on the job for less than five years. It’s beat cops that the defund the police activists have their eyes on; “moderates” within that movement admit cops with advanced skills, such as bomb experts, are still needed. But you’re not going to find the specialists, with all due respect to them, patrolling the streets at dawn on Christmas morning.

“Call a friend, call a cop,” was the slogan of PSAs back in the 1970s. Alright, perhaps you don’t need to have cops as your pals. But police officers sure come in handy when all hell is about to break loose.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Brady vs the Expectations game revisited

With one exception I’ve had little use for the new Woke NFL this season. As you may or may not know I’ve never been a huge football fan, but I’ve been a fan of three players in my lifetime. The 1st of Steve Grogan who I thought was the toughest player to ever play QB and the 2nd was his favorite receiver Stanley Morgan.

The 3rd is Tom Brady, who single handedly turned around the Boston Sports scene. His success forced the other franchises to get serious about winning. During his time in Boston 12 championships came here, six of them won by him but every major franchise won at least one title (Ironically just as Brady won as many titles as all the major franchise combined his three losses in title game also equals all the other Boston franchise during that time).

While I’ve tuned out the woke NFL I’ve kept tabs on Brady. He’s hated by many in the media/ Left as a Trump friend, although not vocal on it, but it’s no coincidence that Tampa Bay’s is the one franchises whose ratings have been consistently up.

So let’s revisit my expectations for Tampa this season. In their pre-Brady era Tampa Bay:

  • Had a winning record 30% of the time (13 seasons)
  • Won 11 or more games 7% of the time (3 seasons 1999,2002,2005)
  • Won their division 12% of the time (1970,1981, 1999,2002,2005,2007)
  • Made the playoffs 23% of the time (10 seasons)
  • Won at least 1 playoff game 9% of the time (1979,1997,1999,2002)
  • Won the Superbowl 2% (100% of the times they went 2002)

Meanwhile Tom Brady Patriots during his career has

  • Had a winning record 100% of the time
  • The Patriots won at least 12 games 70% of the time
  • The Patriots won their division & made the playoffs 90% of the time
  • The Patriots won at LEAST one playoff game 70% of the time
  • The Patriots went to the Superbowl 50% of the time
  • The Patriots WON the superbowl 30% of the time (67% of the times they went)

and Brady after Age 40 not counting this season has:

  • Had a winning record 100% of the time
  • Won at least 12 games 67% of the time (at least 11 100%)
  • Won his division 100% of the time
  • Made the playoffs 100% of the time
  • Won at least 1 playoff game 67% of the time
  • Gone to the Superbowl 67% of the time
  • Won the Superbowl 33% of the time

During those three years Tampa Bay has

  • Had a losing record 100% of the time
  • Missed the playoffs 100% of the time

We now however have Tom Brady both at age 43 and without Bill Belichick in a division with a Saints team run by the man who he has been fighting for the all time lead in TD’s.

So How is Tom Brady doing at age 43 at the end of a long season.. Well Brady went into yesterday’s game with a chance to send the Bucks to their first post season since 2007. Here’s what he did:

And that’s just in the 1st half.

Bottom line the worst Tampa Bay can do is a 10-6 record and a date with Seattle in the 1st round of the playoffs. Their best case scenario is an 11-5 record and a trip to face the former Redskins.

I set my expectations for Tampa based on three season suggesting they should:

  1. Tampa Bay Should expect to have a winning record 100% of the time
  2. Tampa Bay Should expect to win at least 10 games 67% of the time
  3. Tampa Bay Should expect to make the playoffs 67% of the time
  4. Tampa Bay Should expect to win at least one playoff game 67% of the time
  5. They should expect to win their division at least 33% of the time
  6. They should make the NFC Championship game at least once

As of this moment Brady is 1/3 of the way toward #1 and half way home to 2 & 3. He has two more seasons to manage #5 and we’ll see show he does in the playoffs this season to judge 4 & 6.

But as of right now we must conclude the Brady experiment in Tampa Bay is a success

Closing Thought #1: Brady has had at least one senior moment this season (vs Chicago) and frankly the coaching in Tampa Bay has been abysmal. Does anyone doubt for one moment that if Belichick was coaching this team they would be at worst with 11 wins and be in the hunt for the division title and at best with 12 wins and the Saints chasing them?

Closing Thought #2 It’s worth noting that even if the Playoff Schedule was not expanded then the Bucks would have clinched a berth this year and a trip to Washington.

Closing Though #3 With the Woke NFL ratings crashing and burning the league should thank it’s lucky stars for Brady. Their playoff ratings will likely depend on how far he goes. I hope he goes all the way, not only because I like him but it will make all the right people miserable.

Seeing is not believing

Merry Christmas to all, on this, the third day of Twelvetide. The head of the Church of England put out her annual Christmas message, speaking of hope and recounting tales of heroic nurse Florence Nightingale as inspiration in the battle against the Wuhan virus. But it was her second message that counted as the true harbinger of the coming era.

But Queen Elizabeth did not actually give a second message. British Channel Four created a deepfake Queen, talking about the importance of family (as the camera focuses on photos of Harry and Megan – famously splitting from the Royal Family to reside in North America – and Prince Andrew – who has scandalized the Royals by his friendship to the pedophilic vampire Jeffrey Epstein).

Deepfakes are synthetic digital videos or photographs in which one person in the image is substituted for another and, with the help of artificial intelligence, so creates an incredibly lifelike, but fake, representation.

Channel Four’s deepfake Queen’s real message focused on trust, and suggested the audience should not always trust what it sees on our screens – and then proceeded to show a supposed TikTok video of the Queen dancing to club music on the top of her desk.

The ridiculousness of what the video depicted served to highlight Channel Four’s message about the unreliability of media these days, where the ability to create lifelike images has never been greater. Seeing is no longer believing.

After November’s election, “South Park’s” Trey Parker and Matt Stone created a deepfake President Trump in a gauche Christmas sweater bemoaning fake elections for their web series “Sassy Justice.” Again, like the Queen’s, this deepfake’s utter absurdity made its phoniness transparent. But as this technology grows in popularity and in usage, that of course will not always be the case. In fact, the reader can be sure that nefarious figures will use the tech for nefarious means.

Case in point: the Chinese Communist regime recently promoted a fake image of an Australian soldier holding a bloody knife at an Afghan baby‘s throat through Twitter, and using a network of fake Twitter accounts to spread and promote the image. Tensions between China and Australia have deteriorated in the wake of the Wuhan pandemic, Australia forbidding Chinese tech giant Huawei from installing 5G wireless technology, and Australian criticism of China’s violations of its 1997 Hong Kong accord with the United Kingdom. The fake image was tweeted out by Chinese senior foreign ministry spokesman Lijian Zhao.

With the credibility of government officials crumbling to ever greater ruins with each passing day, deepfakes give the mindful observer just one more reason to disbelieve everything he hears and sees. It may not be the message of hope the Queen wishes to impart, but then, who’s to say the Queen’s first Christmas message was any truer than the second? Can’t trust anything these days.

[Note: updated to include title and correct a typo on 12/27/2020.]