The long march

While Joe Biden begins his Presidency by mouthing calls for unity, the divide in the U.S. only grows stronger, with the latest barriers between red and blue America erected by Biden himself. And the silence and acquiescence of the national media to executive orders that suspend regulations protecting the U.S. power grid from Communist China, attempt to redefine sex, and that subvert American-Canadian trade ties and immediately destroy a thousand of well-paying union jobs highlights in stark relief that same divide between an urban, worldly intellectual class and the rural, patriotic working class. The mainstream media is made up almost entirely by the former, and its product reflects that all too well.

Journalism used to be littered with writers whose education did not include a university degree, but instead came from the real world. Damon Runyon, H.L. Mencken, Jimmy Breslin, Paul Anderson were legendary journalists, none of whom ever obtained a university degree. Their formative years were spent in the military taking orders, or on the streets making a wage, trying to make ends meet. The skills they needed to do their job was the ability to speak, observe, and write. Back then, those skills were taught in high school.

Today, to even step foot in New York City requires at least a bachelor’s degree. A job search for “news reporter” in a stereotypical Heartland of America town like Des Moines, Iowa, reveals jobs like “general assignment reporter, ” “investigative reporter” and even “dining/features reporter” all in state a bachelor’s degree or even a masters’ degree is “preferred.”

The media companies, that is, the television companies, are made up of university graduate steeped in university culture, a culture that is soaked in Marxism, sexual libertinism, and identity politics. So long as the gates to American culture demand steeping its youth in such a culture for professional advancement, so long will that culture’s values seep from our televisions. Until conservatives begin their own long march through the institutions, we can only expect more of the same.

One thought on “The long march

Leave a Reply