Five thoughts Under Other Fedora’s: Surber on Welk, Pirates Cove on Features vs Bugs Gateway Pundit on Audits, Granite Grok on Sunlight and Motus AD on it’s lack

Don Surber: Don’t mess with Lawrence Welk:

Welk was a hard-working, intelligent man who ran a music and real estate empire with a fourth-grade education.

In his obituary, The Sun said, “In 1956, ABC-TV broadcast Mr. Welk from coast to coast, and for the ensuing 16 years the Welk show missed only one week — in the aftermath of the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963.

“ABC finally dropped the show in 1971, deciding that Mr. Welk’s audience was too old to attract commercial sponsors looking for a more youthful and affluent market. His sponsors at the time reflected Mr. Welk’s demographics: Geritol and Sominex.

“Mr. Welk responded by syndicating his own show, which ultimately was picked up by more than 250 stations around the country — more, even, than had aired his show on ABC.

“The program did not miss a week of air time until weekly production ended in 1982.”

A guy like Welk is a great Danger to the left because he demonstrate the ability to make it not only without a public education but was able to bypass the networks because he through hard work created something that the people wanted.


Pirates Cove talks about the efforts to make it harder for law abiding citizens to defend themselves in Oregon:

opponents say forcing people to keep guns locked up could waste precious moments if they need to defend themselves against armed intruders.

Jim Mischel, of Sheridan, Oregon, described how his wife woke up when he was away one night in 1981. She heard a noise, went to investigate and saw that a man had broken into their home.

She returned to the bedroom and tried to get to a pistol that was in a locked gun box in the nightstand.

“She was unable to get the box unlocked and the pistol out before he got into the bedroom and threatened her with his gun,” Mischel said. “She has never recovered.”

Criminals will know this. They will know that lots of people will comply (why do Dem voters even have guns in places like Portland? Aren’t they anti-gun? Or just anti-gun for Other People?). Law abiding citizens will have a choice: lock the guns up making them almost worthless for home defense, or be a criminal by making sure they are handy. I wonder how much influence the gun storage industry has on this, and other similar, bills.

People unable to defend themselves from armed Democrat Voters thugs is a feature not a bug to those in Oregon.


At Gateway Pundit a point I’ve often made is repeated:

Senator Gray responded to a similar question from Spicer after Spicer said, “you’ll recount the ballots and you’ll get the same number”:

We have a lot of concerned voters who don’t trust the system, so the whole purpose of this verifying to the voters that this system was accurate.   And of course, it is the legislature’s responsibility to deal with election laws.  So if there are any problems, we need to change some statutes and adjust to make sure what we are doing is appropriate.”

Fann then shared this:

Unfortunately and what is interesting is from the get-go it has been nothing but certifying election integrity.  But the fact that we have been pushed back.  They have sued us.  They are threatening to sue us again.  Maricopa County supervisors have done everything in their power to prevent us from doing this and now I’m beginning to wonder why would they not want to prove that their election system works, that it’s perfect.  I don’t understand why we are getting threatened, sued and threatened, when all we want to do is election integrity here.”

People who know their election is above board and honest and want to convince those in doubt should be happy to have an audit confirm it.

People who have stolen an election do not.


Granite Grok notes how sunlight is the best way to change a pols mind particularly on a local level:

The big news was released at the beginning of the meeting. Chairman Ross McLeod announced the Selectmen had decided it was more appropriate to forego their non-public (secret) meeting and choose their forensic analyst in public view at next Monday’s meeting.

That decision was triggered by a considerable amount of public input and addressed concerns that the process should be transparent to reflect legislative intent.

The massive number of emails that were received by Town Hall represented the enormous displeasure of the public.

If you can’t stop the audit of the ballots the next best thing is to play game with the selection process. Thanks to the public these games are over and the first stone of the wall of silence might now come down.


Finally Motus AD’s post on the small risings in the woke land of expensive education ends with an interesting note:

Perhaps the most telling aspect of this little morality play being acted out in real time is the fact that neither the New York Times (America’s Newpaper of Record) [SIC] nor The Washington Post (Democracy Dies In Darkness) have covered either story. Nor have they covered any other stories concerning the ideological takeover of the schools…or media. When you’re part of the cabal you decide all the news that’s fit to print.

Personally I think the more people know about what is happening in the school systems the more likely people will cheer them remaining closed.

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