What Do Places Where Riots and Looting take place have in common?

The Answer, they invariably take place in cities & areas where the leadership has a dim view of the 2nd amendment.

I have a sneaking suspension that neighborhoods and towns where citizens are well armed are not going to see the riots we have seen in some cities, and I further predict that business owners who are in front of their shops holding a shotgun will find their shops largely intact and protesters limiting their activist to actual protesting and marching.

https://datechguyblog.com/2020/05/27/the-late-steven-den-beste-on-trump-accidentally/Cue Den Beste:

By Jacksonian lights, no rule of law works without the threat of force, and if the threat of force is removed then lawbreakers will come out of the woodwork.

Local communities that are well armed and make it clear that those commuting violence are taking their lives in their hand will remain safe, communities that signal looting and rioting will be tolerated will get more of it.

It’s that simple.

Closing thought: I submit and suggest that the left has been hoping and praying for something like this for a long time and their real desire is to have some useful idiot get killed while threatening an armed citizen so they can use said idiot as a martyr. To the left, who will do all they can to get this outcome , this would be a feature not a bug because they believe it to be to their advantage politically and to some degree financially.

I predict this will continue until they conclude that it will cost them more votes than it will gain.

DaTechGuy off DaRadio Livestream Podcast A Jacksonian Twist, That’s A Riot SPECIAL TIME 3:00 PM EST

DaTechGuy of DaRadio livestraem podcast starts at a special time today 3 PM because of the surprise cancellation of work and my wife’s windshield repair. We’ll talk a bit about Trump the Jacksonian and about the riots going on in Minnesota.

You can watch the livestream here?

I hope you enjoy it.

Trump Fighting General Sherman’s War

John Henry Thomas: We’ll give them a taste of General Sherman’s War

Confederate Col James Langdon: I remember

The Undefeated 1969

About a year before his more famous march through Georgia, William Tecumseh Sherman led a two pronged attack on Mississippi, namely on Meridian, and while the Cavalry prong was broken off by Nathan Bedford Forest against 2-1 odds Sherman’s main force hit the town and the country side around it in a devastating fashion causing millions of (1863) dollars of damage and laying waste to the area as a preview what would happen during his famous March Though Georgia (and South Carolina) in the coming years.

After his withdrawal from Meridian he put out a paper with the intention of having it widely circulated to as he put it “prepare the South for my coming”. It said in part:

If they want eternal war, well and good; we accept the issue, and will dispossess them and put our friends in their place. If they think different, let them persist in war three years longer, and then they will not be consulted. Three years ago by a little reflection and patience they could have had a hundred years of peace and prosperity, but they preferred war; very well. All the powers of earth cannot restore them their slaves, any more than their dead grandfathers. Next year their lands will be taken, for in war we can take them, and rightfully, too, and in another year they may beg in vain for their lives. A people who will persevere in war beyond a certain limit ought to know the consequences. Many, many peoples with less pertinacity have been wiped out of national existence

And that in a slightly round about way brings us to Donald Trump and Joe Scarborough. A topic that I must confess I’m surprised to still be writing about a full week after this could and should have died.

I’ve already explained both why I presume there is no “there” there in this case and why President Trump saw advantage in the move. In fact Twitter’s caving into the Democrat mob on “fact check” might already have produced advantage, namely an excuse to remove their protection from suits, treating them as a publisher rather than a platform, but the more I see the reaction out there the more I think I missed the real point of this.

Gandalf: Saurman you were deep in the enemy’s counsel. Tell us what you know.

Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King Extended Version 2003

As a businessman who had to do business in deep blue cities and deal with deep blue pols, as a celebrity involved in the TV and movie business, as a person who ran casinos and as a much sought after source of funds for political campaigns, Donald Trump, like Saurman was deep in the enemy counsel. For almost half a century he was feted by these types. I suspect he has heard every single bit of gossip and rumor than all these types offered up after a few rounds (while he remained sober) and like the businessman he is squirreled that away for future reference.

TV Exec 1: What’s he writing?

TV Exec 2: Duck? Did anyone do anything with a Duck?

EdTV 1999

Furthermore we’ve already explained that Donald Trump is a Jacksonian who has no compunction about giving back exactly what he has gotten. Treat him nice, he’ll treat you nice. Say a good word about him, he’ll say a good word about you. Try to destroy him, and he will retaliate.

President Trump would have likely let this go if Mika and company had not gone after Twitter over it. And he has plenty of other balls in the air that he is giving his time to. But now that Mitt and others are trying to hit him over it. I think it’s likely that he might give this story one more hit to make the point clear to the next celebrity, newsman, pol who he has known for decades who tries to cross him.

Gillom Rogers: Mr. Books, How is it you’ve killed so many men? My spread wasn’t much bigger than yours.

John Bernard Books: First of all,friend, there’s no one up there shooting back at you. Second, I found most men aren’t willing, they bat an eye, or draw a breath before they shoot. I won’t.

The Shootist 1976

If he is willing to go this far with Scarborough he is certainly willing to do so with you. The left has suggested that they will retaliate against and and all who are Trump allies. Trump has now made it clear that no amount of pressure will prevent him from giving the Scarborough treatment to any person who comes after him the same way if he so chooses, and he has a long memory for events.

I’d swear his ancestry was Sicilian

The Late Steven Den Beste on Trump (Accidentally)

Yesterday I used a line from an old piece from the late Steven Den Beste’s spectacular blog USS Clueless to describe why Donald Trump has no issue using the Lori Kalusius case vs Joe Scarborough, Re-reading the base piece in question it occurs to me that in that post Mr. Den Beste, despite dying in 2016 before the Trump presidency. managed to sum up what it would be like a full 15 years before it happened. Here is the piece in it’s entirety

Stardate 20020811.0544

(On Screen): For about the fifth time in a week, I have written a longish response to a reader and then decided that it would make a good post instead. (It’s a way of leveraging my time, I guess; it gives me the liberty of spending a long time on response to a letter.)

Dave from the UK discovered my site a couple of days ago and wrote to me about it. I answered some of his questions, and noted how he seemed puzzled by some of what Americans do. So I pointed him to Walter Russell Mead’s brilliant article describing the influence of Jacksonianism on American foreign policy. Dave responded to that with an attempt to claim that it seemed to him that it should be in the interests of Jacksonians to support world government and the world rule of law, and he didn’t understand their (our) deep antipathy to it.

I suppose I should mention in passing that I don’t totally align with pure Jacksonianism as described by Mead. For one thing, it relies heavily on a strong religious tradition and I’m an atheist. But I identify much more strongly with the Jacksonian policy than I do with any of the other three that Mead describes (Wilsonian, Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian). So quoting Dave and interspersing my responses:

There is a particular….attitude that Mr Mead attributes to the Jacksonian party in his piece which seems to be more dogma than sense. The assumption that any attempt to establish an international framework is doomed to failure. This is a nihilistic argument. Later in the piece Mr Mead cites the post WW2 reconstruction of W.Germany and Japan as being within the Jacksonian tradition and positive for the common good. This I accept and agree with.

I had always thought that the small government, free-enterprise tradition, of the United States was its greatest strength. “The business of America is business” and for immigrants willing to work the streets can be paved with gold BUT. Free enterprise requires regulation and rule of law to work. Without it all transactions are COD and so all economies limited to the high street.

For the Jacksonian party to be able to prosper and thrive in their individual and self-sufficient tradition then, on a national and international level they must accept a degree of regulation and rule of common law for free trade to function correctly.

Economically crippled post WW1 Germany led to WW2. Economically viable and INTERNATIONALLY LINKED post WW2 W.Germany made the concept of a war with its trading partners unthinkable.

It isn’t really dogma, it’s just realism. Jacksonians know that there are really nasty people out there and know that it isn’t possible to avoid dealing with them. There have always been nasty people and there always will be in the future. Jacksonian foreign policy is crafted to succeed even when other people are pricks.

Jacksonians don’t consider the pacification of Germany to be the result of law or diplomacy. They think that it’s the result of American military occupation. To put it simply, European peace was made possible by an American threat of war, fifty years of occupation by several American divisions and other military assets. That was the critical difference between 1920 and 1946; in 1920 American Wilsonians tried using diplomacy and the concept of international law and cooperation and friendship and trust, and failed. In 1946, American Jacksonians used military power instead, and succeeded.

George Marshall epitomizes the Jacksonian approach to things. During WWII, as head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marshall as top military officer of the US led us to total victory over Germany, Italy and Japan. After the war, as Secretary of State, Marshall as the top diplomatic officer of the US led us to lasting peace and friendship with those same nations. He was resolute in war, and forgiving and generous in peace, and won both the war and the peace. But he didn’t become friendly and generous to Germany, Italy and Japan until after they had been totally defeated.

And a thousand years of Western European war was ended by American military occupation. (Which is why Jacksonians find European preaching against our military might to be ironic and deeply hypocritical. Europe has disarmed and ceased to rely on military power, but it was only capable of doing so because of American military strength. Europeans didn’t need armies to threaten each other because they were all being threatened by us as a neutral outsider.)

Jacksonians do not think that international frameworks and international cooperation are impossible or unnecessary. But Jacksonians believe that such frameworks should be limited, concentrated, and closely monitored. Cooperation is possible without trust if it is backed with vigilance and the will to retaliate for cheating. (Retaliation can take many forms, of course; it’s not exclusively military.)

And to Jacksonians, trust is foolhardy. There are a lot of good people out there, but there are also a lot of bastards, and if you turn your back someone will stab you in it. “Trust, but verify” is a purely Jacksonian watchword. Those who act honorably will be treated honorably, but those who cheat will be crushed.

This is, however, totally opposite to the more utopian vision of Wilsonians and some Europeans, of a new international order based not on vigilance and retaliation but rather on good will and cooperation and friendship. Were that possible, the result would be wonderful. But Jacksonians think such ideas are delusional; there are just too many people out there waiting for an opportunity to cheat.

In fact, trust does work in some cases. There are people out there who are honorable. But it’s better not to depend on it, and Jacksonians don’t think that it’s necessary to do so. Jacksonians are always prepared for betrayal, because it will happen, somewhere, by someone, eventually.

The structures we require to maintain international trade can be sustained without trust or any kind of world government. Such international frameworks work quite well as long as they are limited, monitored and enforced by a threat of war or other retaliation. What won’t work is any kind of utopian world government where the people of the world band together in peace, harmony and brotherhood, and cooperate with each other just because they’re such nice folks and all. They ain’t. Probably a lot of them are, but there are always going to be bad apples, and there will always be some who will cheat if they think they can get away with it. Such people will react to scolding and other toothless diplomatic reactions to their cheating with contempt; the only solution for them is to nail them to the wall.

The rule of law works within our nation because it is enforced by police and the courts. The rule of international law works because we’re willing to fight when others ignore it if we think the issues involved are sufficiently important.

By Jacksonian lights, no rule of law works without the threat of force, and if the threat of force is removed then lawbreakers will come out of the woodwork. And sometimes they’ll appear anyway, which is why war will always be with us and why good Jacksonians make sure that their nation always remains militarily strong.

Having police and courts doesn’t prevent crime, but it does give us the ability to deal with it. By the same token having a strong military doesn’t prevent the need for war, but it does give us a better chance of winning when the time comes. Nobody wants a war, but if you have to fight one it’s much better to win it than to lose it.

And the police do deter some crime, and having a strong military does prevent some threats of war. Jacksonians are deeply practical; perfect solutions aren’t possible and this one is the best available to us.

While it’s true that some degree of international regulation is required in order for trade and other international dealings to take place, Jacksonians are always suspicious of such regulations because they want to make sure that the regulators don’t have an ulterior motive, and to make sure that everyone is playing by the same rules. The situation works because it is subject to constant scrutiny and because we don’t go overboard relying on it.

Basically, Jacksonians believe that others will play fair, but some of them will only do so as long as they know they’re being watched.

In its distrust/rejection of international government the Jacksonian party hurts itself. Jacksonian traditions and goals of free enterprise and self-reliance can spread globally via Global Free Trade, without it, their capacity to prosper within the US itself is constrained and ultimately doomed.

Jacksonians don’t have any interest in spreading their philosophy around the world. It isn’t evangelistic; indeed, the entire concept of trying to actively spread that or any other philosophy around the world is deeply repugnant to pure Jacksonians. Jacksonians are anti-imperialistic.

The whole point of Jacksonianism is “You leave me alone and I’ll leave you alone. You play fair with me and I’ll play fair with you. But if you fuck with me, I’ll kill you.”

To Jacksonians, it is entirely possible to create an adequate world framework of consistent and fair behavior, sufficient to support trade, through vigilance and the threat of reprisal (military or otherwise). Going beyond that to a world government as such is neither necessary, desirable nor even possible, and the best case is where there is as little international framework and governance as can be: only the bare minimum required but no more. Anything beyond that will eventually be abused by someone, so it’s better to do without it.

Wilsonians want a world government. Jacksonians think that’s a fool’s quest. And contrary to your supposition that world government is required for successful international trade, the reality is that the last fifty years of international trade were managed under Jacksonian principles, and quite successfully too.

Free trade inside the US works because of the threat of force implicit in the police and the courts. Free trade works internationally because we are strong, alert and willing to retaliate against those who cross us. To Jacksonians, that is sufficient. Nothing else is needed, and nothing else can work.

All italics represent quotes in the orgional all bold is my empasis

I defy anyone to read that post, particularly the parts I’ve bolded and not think: My God, he’s talking about Donald Trump.

Incidentally Mr. Den Beste was in my opinion, one of the greatest bloggers who ever lived. his writing was intelligent, well reasoned. That most people today have never heard of him and even those who might have heard of him in passing, but never read his work, have no idea what they missed.

I submit and suggest that he is definitely worth your time and I’d suggest a peek at the old archives or if you’re (unlike me) into Anime, his last blog chizumatic which in his final post referring to a possible outage warning from his internet provider, ironically closes with this, the last line that he would ever blog:

Regardless, it’s possible I’ll be out of contact for some period over the weekend

Trump, Scarborough, Lori Klausutis, Jacksonian Jujutsu

“For the measure with which you measure will in return be measured out to you.”

Luke 6:38

Today at both Twitchy & Powerline the attempt to have the president’s tweets concerning the Lori Klausutis deleted.  Her husband appeal to have it pulled gave the story further legs and now the AP, via the Star Tribune has weighted in:

No one in Klausutis’ family would talk about Trump’s tweets for this article, fearing retaliation by online trolls of the type who went after parents of the Sandy Hook massacre victims. Their grief has been disrupted by conspiracy theories before — not only over the past few years from the White House, but from some liberals who at the time of her death sought to portray then-conservative Republican congressman Scarborough as a potential villain.

“There’s a lot we would love to say, but we can’t,” said Colin Kelly, who was Klausutis’ brother-in-law.

Scarborough, who was 900 miles away in Washington, D.C., on the day Klausutis died, and his co-host and wife, Mika Brzezinski, have both expressed outrage on the air in recent days — saying that Trump’s false accusations were most hurtful to Klausutis’ family. Brzezinski called Trump a “cruel, sick, disgusting person” and said he was using the episode to distract from the pandemic.

emphasis mine

That throw away line in the piece is actually the key to this case. as I brought up last week here:

Does anyone think for one moment that the mainstream media, still angry over the Bush victory and the Clinton Impeachment (that Scarborough voted for) would not have jumped all over this story and made it national news (particularly given Scarborough’s Sept 5th resignation) and a talking point to hit Republicans over? After all here you have a GOP congressman representing one of the most republican districts in his state, A republican who voted for Slick Billy’s impeachment with a dead female intern in his office. It would be a Godsend for the left Would this have not lead on CNN or MSNBC? Would not the New York Times and Washington Post used this as a club asking every GOP member of congress or the cabinet with devastating effect? Would they not when that congressman resigned seven weeks later suggest it was proof that something was up? Would this not be made a campaign issue in the special congressional election with demands that GOP candidate call for a fuller and deeper investigation?

You bet your ass they would!

And remember this was BEFORE he transformed himself into the type of Republican that Democrats like the most, the type willing to attack the GOP.

bold in original

in a long twitter thread that started here: a sample

And even on my livestream podcast:

This is the argument to kill this entire thing, but it’s not a argument that anyone on the left wants to make because said argument could concede the media bias that even today they pretend doesn’t exist.

I suspect Joe Scarborough, who certainly doesn’t need this, wishes he could use this point, but instead they are stuck with the “conspiracy theory” card. Powerline notes a tad of irony:

This is an example of the kind of dumb thing I wish President Trump wouldn’t do. I assume there is no reason to think that Joe Scarborough had anything to do with Ms. Klausutis’s death. But isn’t there a larger point here? What has Joe Scarborough done for the last 3 1/2 years but spread “debunked conspiracy theories” about Donald Trump–most notably, but by no means limited to, the Russia hoax–“speculated without evidence” about the Russia hoax, the Ukraine kerfuffle and other matters, and “unleashed a torrent of false allegations, mischaracterizations and baseless rumors” about the president? That sounds like Scarborough’s job description at MSNBC.

And what about the Washington Post? Despite its high and mighty tone in describing the president’s “spread[ing a] debunked conspiracy theory,” hasn’t that been the Post’s own stock in trade for years, when it comes to Donald Trump? Speculating without evidence, spreading conspiracy theories that turn out to be false, and unleashing a torrent of false allegations, mischaracterizations and baseless rumors sums up very well the Post’s coverage of the Donald Trump campaign, and of his presidency since January 2017.

So, while I am critical of tweets like the ones the Post is complaining about, I have a hard time working up a lot of sympathy for Joe Scarborough, and I can’t read the Post’s self-righteous account with anything but derision.

I think this is worthy of critique but “dumb” is not the word here. Trump understands that every cry of “conspiracy theory” by the media, given what we saw over the last three years make the left look ridiculous , even to some who dislike the President, and of course if they speak the obvious truth that I’ve laid out here they confirm all the President has said about them which is even worse for the left.

POTUS can’t lose here that’s why he picked this fight. He is a Jacksonian whose entire philosophy can be summed up by this sentence written nearly twenty years ago by the late great Steven Den Beste one of the greatest bloggers who ever lived

The whole point of Jacksonianism is “You leave me alone and I’ll leave you alone. You play fair with me and I’ll play fair with you. But if you fuck with me, I’ll kill you.”

That’s Trump all over.

Update: Instalanche thanks Ed. If you like this post tune in tomorrow for a post on how Steve Den Bestie back in 2002 accidentally laid out how Trump would govern. Don’t miss our livestream podcast every Friday morning at 9:30 AM EST You can watch the latest edition on Judge Jackson,US foes buying US Universities (the last of the Monday 12:35 AM Edition ones) here.

Update 2: I was reading the comments at Instapundit I was shocked to read at least one person say it was unclear if the media jumped on this at the time or not. While I can’t see how someone would not figure it out from this post let me say explicitally that they did not and again refer to DaTechGuy’s 4th law of Media Outrage which states:

The degree of media exposure of the corruption or illegality committed by any individual or organization under investigation is directly proportional to its distance from the media’s ideology.

If this had happened in 2018 involving NEVERTRUMP Scarborough I could see the MSM ignoring it as they did, but it happened in 2001 involving conservative GOP Scarborough no chance they don’t jump on it if there was any there there.

Update 3: Quick FYI I work 3:30 to Midnight and don’t have a cell so I’m offline during that time and all comments are moderated so I apologize to anyone who had to wait for their comment to be approved.

Update 4: The sequel to this post is titled The Late Steven Den Beste on Trump (Accidentally)

My wife and daughter escaped the Illinois lockdown and traveled to Wisconsin

By John Ruberry

As I wrote a couple of posts back the unemployment rate is 67 percent in the Marathon Pundit home here in suburban Chicago. Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, they were furloughed from their jobs.

Obviously in possession of free time Mrs. Marathon Pundit and Little Marathon Pundit decided to travel on this holiday weekend–they headed to Wisconsin. I stayed here to work.

Illinois, run by a Democrat from Chicago, J.B. Pritzker, remains under lockdown. You cannot enter supermarkets or any store with out a mask. Up in Wisconsin, its state Supreme Court struck down its shelter-in-place order made by its Democratic governor, Tony Evers. And its mask requirements.

Wisconsin is a free state. Illinois is a lockdown state. It’s that simple. My wife and daughter’s money is being spent not her3 but north of the Cheese Curtain. In a way they remind me of Poles in the last years of the Cold War visiting West Germany.

Illinois, according to WalletHub, has the most restrictive COVID-19 restrictions in the nation.

I just got off the phone with Mrs. MP. She enthusiastically told me about her first dine-in restaurant experience in two months. The restaurants in Illinois that are open are open for take-out only. On Friday outdoor dining will be allowed in the Prairie State. What if it rains? What if these diners aren’t equipped for al fresco serving? What if they don’t have the necessary permits? What if the restaurant owners can’t apply for an outdoor dining permit because their village hall is closed because of the coronavirus lockdown? Thanks for next-to-nothing, Pritzker.

Then my wife told me about their arrival yesterday in the small town of Mineral Point in the southwestern part America’s Dairyland. There was–wait for it–a parade! One for recent high school graduates. While the graduation ceremony was cancelled, grads in Mineral Point received their moment of glory on the streets. As far as I can gather all parades scheduled in Illinois in spring or early summer were cancelled. “A few people wore masks,” she told me of the people participating or viewing the parade, “but most didn’t.” Some stores are open–mostly the locally-owned ones as opposed to the big chains. “When you go in those places, you don’t have to wear masks,” she enthused.

My wife and daughter went inside, yes inside, a coffee shop, and drank coffee, although a sign outside of that establishment said, “Masks are recommended.” But masks weren’t even recommended when they entered an ice cream parlor.

Many other Illinoisans have escaped to Wisconsin too. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel spoke to one refugee from the Pritzker Lockdown who journeyed to Lake Geneva. “‘All for it,” said Dave Gragnani of McHenry, Illinois, who said he planned to visit a coffee shop and skatepark without any mask or hand sanitizer. “People should have a choice. I’m having a wonderful time.'”

Good for you, Dave!

As the saying goes, “You don’t know what you have until it’s gone.”

Not as much as Wisconsin, but Indiana is opening up too. And of course the welcome mat is open there for Illinoisans fed up with the lockdown. I’m sure Iowa, where my family traveled last month, as well as Missouri and Kentucky, the other states that border Illinois, are enjoying an influx of cash-flush Illinoisans.

Yes, I’m aware that nearly 100,000 people have died of the coronavirus in the United States, although nearly every one of them already had serious health problems. Nursing homes, hospitals, and senior centers need extra protection. 

It’s time to open up the rest of America. And the world. 

Dennis Prager earlier this month wrote that the worldwide COVD-19 lockdown might be biggest mistake in history

John Ruberry regularly writes at Marathon Pundit.

The Unexpectedly Chronicles: Trained in Fear & Helplessness

One of the least surprising things that I’ve seen in the last few weeks has been people so willing to jump on the fear of re-opening bandwagon.

Despite the data, despite what we’ve seen in Florida, Texas and elsewhere there is a solid population that are terrified of the thought of re-opening the country.

Now I’m not talking about those driven by political considerations, (a economy that comes back helps Trump) I’m talking about actual people afraid of what might happen if we do.

Some might be surprised at this development but I’m actually shocked it’s not worse.

For a generation we gave out participation trophies because we were afraid of hurting feelings of those who didn’t win.

You people pushing the idea that grades and tests were bad because it might affect the self esteem of some.

In fact we reached the point where in colleges, places of supposedly higher education we had grief counselors assigned not only over election results that people didn’t like, but also over people who dared utter opinions that differed from the status quo.

And in the last year the use of a pronoun that one didn’t like caused people to crumble

In short we spent twenty years training people not to be able to cope with little things, in fact think of the fairly new word “microaggressions” it’s very name this suggests something small and meaningless, yet for thousands it represents something unbearable.

And now take these people weaned on fear and panic and introduce a virus that can actually kill you.

Do you really expect people who have been weaned on abject panic concerning trifles to be able to cope when faced with the prospect, however small of dying from an actual deadly disease?

So if you find yourself shaking your head over their fear that chunks of the country have over re-opening consider, the surprise isn’t that so many people are gripped with fear, the surprise is that after a quarter century of conditioning more aren’t

Under the Fedora Irish Democracy, The “New Rules” , the Sullivan Precedents, the Obama Precedents, and a realistic Mass Livestream

I oppose the whole sanctuary City business as a violation of the rule of law, however if there is one thing you can say about the Sanctuary City movement is that it is in keeping of the American Tradition of completely ignoring laws that they don’t like.

We’re now seeing a glimpse of this in NYC:

When you have a one party state or city it usually takes an “I’m mad as hell and can’t take it anymore moment. I’m wondering if this might become the case in blue states that remain locked down as other places open.


One other thing about Sanctuary Cities is they work both ways.

“A resolution of the city council of the city of Atwater affirming the city’s commitment to fundamental rights of life, liberty, and property, and declaring the city of Atwater a sanctuary city for all businesses,” the resolution read.

A statewide shelter-in-place order has been in effect since March 19, with gradual easements happening this month. While some counties were reportedly approved to move to “Phase 2” of the state’s reopening plan, which would allow some non-essential lower-risk business to reopen, Atwater’s Merced County was not included.

It will be fun to see the left object to these thing as they’ve objected to sanctuary gun counties. Perhaps they should have thought about the “new rules” as Kurt Schlichter calls them, before imposing them.


The same thing applies to liberals rushing to cheer Judge Sullivan who is doing all he can to pretend that he’s in a Soviet Courtroom rather than an american one. In one respect given how this entire Mike Flynn business has gone such actions by the left should be unsurprising but I’d remind our friend on the left that Donald Trump has appointed a 3rd of the judiciary at this point and you might not like the Sullivan Standards if they are applied to their allies.

The left will not consider these tactics an outrage until they are used against them and under a Jacksonian president, I’d not be surprised to see it, except for the fact that he’s not to my knowledge appointing Jacksonian judges. As Razor put it on twitter:


It’s not often that I disagree with President Trump but I think this is a VERY bad idea:

It’s worth noting that the reason why President Trump has been able to so effectively pack the courts with conservatives is that Harry Reid changed the rules when he presumed that the left would hold the Senate forever.

It’s also a bad political move. I suspect that while Black Americans intellectually know that Barack Obama was a disaster in the White House for America in general and them in particular they cling to the myth of the light-bringer culturally to the point where they might actually turn out to defend that fantasy.


Turned on a livestream of a Sunday Mass on the Roku (I keep ending up finding different ones) and I noticed that there was a chat option.

I thought this was odd considering you aren’t supposed to be talking in Mass but if nothing else said option is an exercise in realism.

Masks dehumanize us

Discarded medical mask, Miami Woods, Morton Grove, Illinois

By John Ruberry

On my way to work here in Illinois–where Democratic governor JB Pritzker says I have to wear a mask–I was listening to Dennis Prager’s show when he said something along the lines that people connect to each other by way of seeing their faces. Very true. The most obvious example is by way of dating sites, nearly all of the profiles include face pics. Whether you are old or young, thin or heavy, bald or hairy, every expert on creating profiles for LinkedIn recommends using a quality head shot on that employment networking site. 

Faces are how we remember people. When you think of Angelina Jolie her lips come to mind. With Jay Leno it’s his prominent chin. With John Bolton his bushy mustache is his visual trademark. If they are wearing masks you won’t see their distinctive facial features. 

A masked face doesn’t allow you to see smiles.

It’s unclear how effective masks are in preventing the spread of COVID-19, with the exception of the N95 mask, which gets its name because it’s supposed to block 95 percent of small particles.  

What is clear is that the projections of the death total from the novel coronavirus have been alarmist. The most dire one predicted 2.2 million COVID-19 deaths in America–and that prediction likely led to many shelter-in-place orders being put in place, including the one that was extended by Pritzker, most likely illegally, until the end of May. The latter order opened a few more places, such as golf courses, but added a mask requirement for businesses open to the public, such as big box stores. Dine-in restaurants, hair salons, and health clubs remain shuttered. Churches too. 

Humans are primates and primates are social beings. We’re not cats. While there are a few among us who choose the life a hermit, even existences commonly connected with solitude, such as that of a monk or a nun, involve a community where people see each other. Monks typically live in monasteries with other monks. Nuns dwell in convents with other nuns. 

So far COVID-19 is not nearly as deadly as the 1918 Flu Pandemic which killed anywhere from 50-100 million people worldwide–and many of those who died of it were in their twenties and thirties who were otherwise healthy. It is not the Asian Flu of the late 1950s which killed roughly two million. While every death of course is a tragedy, so far 300,000 people have died of COVID-19. In 1918 the world population was about 1.6 billion, in 1958 it was a bit short of 3 billion. Today’s world population is 8 billion. 

A few weeks ago I questioned whether the draconian methods to shut down our economy were worth it, bankruptcies and unemployment are common triggers for substance abuse, depression, spousal and child abuse, and suicide. Since that post we’ve learned nearly all of the coronavirus fatalities suffered from pre-existing conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. 

Now because of masks we are becoming the faceless, like the disturbing images in the “Life of Julia” Obama-Biden campaign video from 2012 that preached to the masses–not to individuals–the inherent power of a government that does everything for you. But remember Barry Goldwater’s warning, “Any government that is big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take away everything you have.”

Like Prager, I’m not a conspiracy nut. But a couple of weeks ago he wrote that the coronavirus overreaction is a dress rehearsal for a police state. Chicago’s vast expanse of lakefront parks–which is 18 miles long–have been closed for six weeks and counting. Churches and dine-in restaurants are closed statewide, as I mentioned earlier. In regards to the latter, for health reasons will the state or local governments in Illinois retain the power to shutter restaurants that serve, let’s say, too much high-fat food? That possibility is no longer far-fetched. 

The lakefront parks won’t be closed forever. But I can easily see Lori Lightfoot or a future Chicago mayor limiting Lincoln Park or Jackson Park to a few hundred visitors each day–with government workers with internal passports first in line of course–in the name of nature preservation or fighting global warming. It will of course all be done in the name of the faceless masses. 

I’m running low on orange juice. I may need run to the supermarket. Where is my mask?

I’ll be less of a human wearing that mask. Is that the plan?

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

One of These Things is not Like the Other. Media Narrative Edition

Yesterday I sent out the following tweet

So what do Stephen Sanders, Rickey King III, Calvin Munerlyn, Cornelius Bruce, Kimberly McCubbin, Darrin White, Carlos Brown, Helle Jae O’Regan, Charles Edward Lewis III, Tina Louise Maldonado and Keyon Rogers have in common with each other.

Like Ahmaud Arbery all of these people are or I should say, were, members of “protected” groups, black, hispanic, women, Transgender women, yet because, their killers were did not fit the profile of the media’s desired narrative, their murders, unlike Ahmaud Arberry’s are not considered worthy of national outrage.

Cue DaTechGuy’s 3rd Law of Media Outrage:

The MSM’s elevation and continued classification of any story as Nationally Newsworthy rather than only of local interest is in direct correlation to said story’s current ability to affirm any current Democrat/Liberal/Media meme/talking point, particularly on the subject of race or sexuality.

And Stacy McCain:

A 1960s radical once said: “The issue is never the issue. The issue is always the revolution.” Whenever the Left seizes on some incident like the Arbery shooting, they do so to advance their agenda, and the role of supposedly “objective” journalists in assisting this project is what we need to focus on

Personally I think that a great question to those outraged over the Arberry case would be to insert any of those name I have listed above and ask why Stephen Sanders, Rickey King III, Calvin Munerlyn, Cornelius Bruce, Kimberly McCubbin, Darrin White, Carlos Brown, Helle Jae O’Regan, Charles Edward Lewis III, Tina Louise Maldonado and Keyon Rogers murders are not worthy of their attention or outrage.

And if you get sick of those names you can go here for a comprehensive list of People murdered in Baltimore or here for a comprehensive list of those murdered in LA (both searchable by race and gender) and find plenty of new one.

Alas I suspect that since these lists grow pretty fast you will have plenty of new names to add to your question by the time the media find their next shooting with the right combination of killer and victim to promote to national prominence.

Closing Thought: Can you think of words to describe a media that only considers the murders of blacks, Hispanics, transgenders and women uninteresting unless they can be someone used to attack their enemies? I can, the word is Racist and sexist!