COVID-19 lockdowns must end for the sake of our overall health

Outside a store in Wisconsin earlier this month

By John Ruberry

Who else besides me is fed up wearing a mask when shopping at a supermarket?

Or at work?

Or a restaurant? 

I haven’t eaten inside an Illinois restaurant–or in a tent–since Governor JB Pritzker instituted his first lockdown in March. I’ve picked up take-out meals only.

Who has had enough of lockdowns?

As a person with a strong libertarian bent I don’t like being bossed around, pestered, or nagged. 

But I’ve been coping with all of that for months. 

I know ten people who’ve contracted COVID-19. Only two of them told me they were very ill. Two were asymptomatic. All of them are still with us–in fact, they’ve all returned to their jobs as if nothing happened. 

Last month the Centers for Disease Control released the survival rates for those who have contracted COVID-19.

  • Age 0-19 — 99.997%
  • Age 20-49 — 99.98%
  • Age 50-69 — 99.5%
  • Age 70+ — 94.6%

So if you are over 70, and most people already know that seniors are more prone to death from COVID-19 than everyone else, you have a 94.6 percent of surviving. President Trump is one of those septuagenarians who has recovered. Yes, COVID-19 is serious, because those stats also say those 70 and over have a slightly higher than 5 percent chance of dying from it. 

Here’s another situation where that percentage, 94 percent, comes in to play. Nearly two months ago the CDC said of those deaths from the novel coronavirus, 94 percent had “multiple chronic conditions.” In other words, they were already unhealthy. Every death is tragic. But part of life is getting sick, getting injured, getting old, and yes, passing away. You can fool, perhaps, your neighbors or co-workers about your true age with hair dye and plastic surgery, but never can you hoodwink Father Time. 

Humans are intensely social animals, as are all primates. It’s in our genetic makeup. The most watched television shows and movies are centered on personal interactions. One of the most popular TV programs ever aired is “Friends.” There is not a show entitled “Hermits,” there is no interest in producing such a program because few people would want to watch it. 

The death rate from COVID-19 is very low for the very young. Yet many of our schools are closed except for cold and impersonal Zoom sessions.

Usually our first and most lasting impressions with others of our species is by way of their faces. But the mask requirements in many states, especially blue ones like mine, take those connections away from us.

The lockdowns have led to an increase in drug overdoses and possibly suicides. Among young people, the CDC says, the death rate for young people is higher for overdoses and suicides than for COVID 19.

That wave just might be beginning. For instance, Chicago, which is just south of where I live, just instated another curfew because of an uptick in COVID cases. All businesses deemed non-essential for the next two weeks must close between 10pm and 6am. Bars and restaurants, already reeling from being closed down this spring, will be hit especially hard. Some of these businesses, especially those struck by looting this summer, will never re-open. Which means of course more people will be prone to suicide and drug and alcohol abuse. The workforce in the food and beverage industry is disproportionately young.

Mrs. Marathon Pundit was an early victim of the COVID-19 lockout layoffs. She’s fine–she has a new job in a different field. But her former boss was forced to downsize his business, which I believe his home mortgage was tied into. He sold his home this summer and moved into a much smaller residence.

There are millions of former business owners facing similar situations across America. And not all workers, such as Mrs. Marathon Pundit, will be able to land on their feet. 

One “fix” to the drop in revenue for brick-and-mortar restaurants is to set up plastic tents next to them. Diners instead of eating indoors will be eating, sort of, outdoors in these tents, but still breathing each other’s air. Alongside them in cold weather climates, in the winter, will be space heaters, which are a well-known fire hazard. 

Follow the science. 

Take a deep breath before reading this next paragraph.

Based on my current age, overall health, and family history, I’ll probably live another 25-years. I do not want to spend those years wearing a mask. I don’t want to go running outdoors–and this really happened–as I run 50 yards past a couple who, in horror, hurriedly put their masks over their faces as I move, maskless, down the street that I live on as if I am Typhoid Mary. According to federal government data, there have been 624 positive cases of COVID-19 in the town I live in, Morton Grove, which has a population of 23,000.

Who frightened that Morton Grove couple? Not me, well not initially that is.

Will the mask mandates return–if they ever go away–when a more virulent than usual strain of the flu strikes?

Follow the science. 

This is not a distress from me call but instead a call for action. For the sake of our overall health–while maintaining strict safety controls in places such as senior homes and hospitals–these lockdowns must end. But I suspect many politicians–such as Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago–don’t want the lockdowns to end. They are too in love with power. Lightfoot and Gov. Pritzker told us we needed the lockdowns to “flatten the curve” in the spring so hospitals wouldn’t be overwhelmed. Now they want to prevent all of us getting sick, which as we know is not possible.

The goalposts keep moving.

Years ago I read in a book about marathon training that stated that distance running, all things being equal, does indeed lead to a longer life expectancy. But more importantly, those extra years on this planet for runners usually mean they are enjoyable years. Who is going to sign up for an additional ten years of life if those years will consist of living in a nursing home in need of 24-hour care?

The quality of life for myself and millions of others is diminished because we are ordered to wear masks and to avoid each other.

End the lockdowns.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Five Thoughts under Other People’s Fedora: Right Wing Granny on NC Voting, Pirates Cove on Democrat Silence, Victory Girls Blog on Law School Students Triggered by ACB, Proof Positive on Home Security Layers and View From the Beach on the Biden/Emails/NY Post Scandal

Early voting began in North Carolina yesterday. Recently the Democrat-controlled State Board of Elections attempted to change the rules regarding absentee ballots just before voting began.

Via Right Wing Granny Avoiding Changing The Rules In The Middle Of The Election

For people who are supposed to be running away with an election the Left are sure anxious to game the rules and keep them gamed.


Think about that: if those changes were good, they would have zero problem saying what they are, instead of worrying that they will alienate voters. That tells you all you need to know about their agenda, just like Handsy Joe refusing to really say whether he would be in favor of packing the courts.

Via Pirates Cove: Democratic Apoplexy Over ACB Could Lead To Changes They Don’t Want To Talk About

If this kind of bait and switch was done in any other business, they would be facing charges.


The girls got ratioed big time. So the lead girl made a response. She says the original Tik Tok was a joke. Yeah, right. Her name is Ariana Garcia-Moore. She is a fan of Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez. Then, she tweeted that it wasn’t a joke because Republicans don’t know the difference between the Ginsburg Rule and non-participation in a hearing. So, which is it?

Via Victory Girls Blog: Law Students Clap Back At ACB On Hypotheticals

Maybe it’s just me but if I owned a business or law firm I’d wouldn’t have to think once about hiring a lawyer or firm with staff that attacked on video a soon to be sitting SCOTUS justice who is a sitting federal judge. You would think a law student might be taught that.


Remember: security is layers. Lighting. Landscaping. Fences. Dead bolts. Dogs. Alarms. Situational awareness. Safe rooms.

Have a gun and know how to use it. But if it is your only level of security, you may not be able to utilize it in time. If you choose not to own a gun, that’s your choice, but the layers of security will help to delay the bad guys until the cavalry can come.

Proof Positive: Security is What You Make It

What a lot of people don’t realize is that unless someone is looking for a specific item in a specific house (incredibly rare) or a mob (Seattle, Portland et/al) it’s those first outer layers of security that make a potential thief decide on an easier target.


When they acknowledge the story at all they continue to hold out for the “Russians Did It” defense,

View From the Beach: Biden with the Bidens

This along with a previous post ( The Biden’s Abide) are a veritable Biden email linkfest with everything you need to keep up with what is going on. What hit me is this post confirms the following tweet. via insty.

DaTechGuy off DaRadio Livestream Podcast 3 PM EST Words Mean Things and Chat with me Edition

Today at 3 PM EST DaTechGuy off DaRadio graces the podcast Livestream waves once again.

Today we’ll be taking questions from people in chat on the issue of the Day and also talking these two topics

  1. Racism at Princeton
  2. Secrets in Nashville

And I’ll of course throw in a dig at Wendys.

The “preshow” starts at 2:55 when I go live and the show proper begins at 3 PM you can watch the livestream below (last weeks show is a placeholder for the post till 2:50 or so)

Hope you enjoy it.

Update on the continuing Illinois Exodus

By John Ruberry

I’ve been writing here about the Illinois Exodus for several years. The COVID-19 outbreak, as it has many other societal trends, is accelerating the people drain. But two rounds of riots and looting, one after the homicide of George Floyd, and the second last month, after false rumors that Chicago Police had killed a man now charged with murder, are gut punches that the city will not quickly recover from. 

In my DTG post-second riot post about the decline and fall of the city, Welcome to Detroit, Chicago, I wrote, “But when Chicago’s downtown area is dominated by boarded up store-fronts with signs declaring ‘Move in now–lease rates reduced again–first month free!’ you’ll know the downtown descent is well under way.” The vacancy rate for luxury units in downtown Chicago are at their highest level ever recorded according to Mike Flannery (more on him in a bit).

I haven’t been downtown since that “Detroit” entry, but on my own blog, Marathon Pundit, an automated Google Ads banner from a downtown Chicago apartment building offered this promo, “First two months rent free.”

Decline and fall.

And keep in mind that over seventy percent of Chicago’s economic activity comes from the downtown area. And Chicago is of course Illinois’ largest and most important city.

Downstate things aren’t much better. AP is reporting on three towns in St. Clair County, which is across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, that are considering merging because of “severe population decline.” St. Clair County, like Chicago and Cook County, are Democratic strongholds where corruption is widespread.

Large swaths of downstate Illinois have been facing population losses for decades, for instance Iroquois County, an agricultural powerhouse that is just 55 miles from Chicago’s city limits, saw its population peak in 1900. Universities have allowed other downstate counties to buck that trend, but enrollment was struggling at many of these colleges before COVID-19 hit. Business Insider last week compiled a list of the “30 college towns that could face economic ruin if schools don’t reopen or have to close again this fall.” Two of them are in Illinois.

The Prairie State has lost population for six straight years. It’s a safe bet that when the counting is over for 2020 it will be seven.

On the usually-worth watching–Fox Chicago’s Flannery Fired Up, three cheerleaders for the city and one moderate skeptic talked about its descent and for the most part, it’s quick bounce back. But this weekend’s episode was an aberration. The show sucked. It was up to the host, Mike Flannery, to bring up the two 800-pound gorillas in Chicago’s otherwise looted basement: rampant corruption and the worst-funded municipal pensions in the nation. 

Since 1973 over thirty members of Chicago City Council have been sentenced to prison. At one time he was the city’s most powerful alderman, but now Ed Burke is under indictment for allegedly shaking down a fast food franchisee. Do you want to bring your business to Chicago? You may have to endure having your pockets picked by a pol. Or by several of them.

Where do I sign up?

Burke has been an alderman since 1969. Chicago needs term limits. And so does Illinois. Boss Michael Madigan, who is from the same part of the city as Burke, has been speaker of the state House since 1983 except for two years in the 1990s when the Republicans had a majority in the lower chamber. Madigan is also a Chicago ward committeeman. He’s been chairman of the Illinois Democratic Party since 1997. Illinois’ most powerful Dem is also currently under investigation as part of an evolving federal corruption probe that has already ended the careers of several Chicago and suburban politicians

There is no way out of Chicago’s pension bomb other than a municipal bankruptcy, one that may also force many city vendors to go under, or a federal bailout. Even if the the Democrats capture the Senate and the White House in November, such a rescue for irresponsible spending, a backhanded reward really, faces tall odds in Washington. But under current Illinois law, government bodies are prevented from declaring bankruptcy.

The “moderate skeptic” on Flannery Fired Up mentioned transportation as a city selling point. While O’Hare is one of the world’s busiest airports–it used to be ranked first in traffic–and Chicago is a rail hub and it has many miles of interstate highways, that “expert” needs to drive on Chicago’s streets. They are falling apart. 

And if you don’t own a car and you use your feet to get around? Watch out, walking on crumbling sidewalks often requires strong ankles and a steady balance. 

Violence in Chicago was declining over the last few years but shootings are way up since the pandemic was declared.

As I’ve mentioned before, like an alcoholic, Chicago’s cure won’t begin until it admits complete and utter defeat. 

That point has not been reached. But it’s probably coming soon.

As it is for the rest of Illinois. The state’s pension programs are almost as poorly funded as Chicago’s.

Decline and fall. 

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Remember the Tea Party Non Riots, The last Straw in SF? History repeating itself, Eucharistic Processions on Oct 17th Please, and How Bad is the Trump Economy? VERY quick thoughts under the fedora

Overslept today after putting in some extra time at work and I have to go in early today as well so no time to post so here are some very quick thoughts.


A Quick reminder, remember when the media was united in declaring the Tea Party and the various Tea Party protest a bunch dangerous violent agitators?

You can count the number of Tea Party events over the year that became riots d on the fingers of one hand, in fact you can likely do so on the thumb of one hand or no hands


I think the Nancy Pelosi Salon story combined with the news concerning city gyms in SF offer the best single chance for her GOP challenger in decades.

People don’t like be played for fools and even leftists know that if they punish her on election day they’ll get the seat back fairly quick.


When I was younger I was always amazed at the rise of the Nazi’s in Germany and the Communists in Russia (although less so the latter given serfdom and the Czars). After watching the left over the last several months and the reaction of the public I am much less amazed.

The smartest thing our enemies ever did was to go after our colleges. People are so much easier to buy.


If I was the Pope I would order a coordinated set of Eucharistic Processions led by the local Bishops or Cardinals of sees in October in Reparation for sins. I’d Choose Saturday October 17 the feast day of St. Ignatius.

Either we believe in the Power of Christ in the Eucharist or we don’t, if we do let’s not be shy about it.


Finally a reminder that tomorrow’s Podcast will be at 11 AM rather than at 3 PM.

This is because the Trump Economy is so bad that I have to work on my day off along with going in early yesterday and today to keep up with all the work we don’t have because the Trump economy is so bad

Five One Liners Under Other Bloggers Fedoras Instapundit, Right Wing Granny, Fisherville Mike, Adrinenne’s Corner and The Lid

IF I WERE THE GOP, I’D JUST RUN CLIPS OF THE DNC DURING THE RNC:

Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit:

Nothing hurts the Democrats more than people seeing them as they are


Sudan (and the other Arab countries) have to make a choice–do they want to submit to Iran or make peace with Israel and remain as independent countries? 

From Right Wing Granny:

The very idea that Sudan is even considering peace with Israel is completely surreal.


But instead of watching sports in June and July, TV viewers watched Fox News.

From Fisherville Mike

I can’t wait till the next round of negotiations for TV contracts for the four major sports takes place.


This is not how we’re supposed to live.

From Adrienne’s Corner

The more I’ve seen of Americans submitting to the mask lie the less I’ve been confused as to how people fell for Communism and Fascism in the 20th century.


It’s not racist to insist that everyone learn to use the same language, it is racist to say that one group doesn’t have the brains to learn the same language as everyone else.

From The Lid

I’m old enough to remember when it was only white supremacists who insisted Black Americans were incapable of achieving at the level of others.

(fyi He’s always be the Yid with Lid to me)

DaTechGuy off DaRadio Livestream No Frills Podcast a JK Rowling Good Time SPECIAL TIME 10 AM EST

Today we move up DaTechGuy off DaRadio livestream No Frills podcast to 10 AM EST rather than 3 PM accommodate some time with DaWife (if people like it we’ll keep it here) our topic(s) for DaWeek are…

  1. JK Rowling and Me or why she isn’t vulnerable to being cancelled
  2. Closed schools, a blessing in disguise
  3. History as it is or why I’m confident of a Trump victory in Election 2020

And if we have time we might talk about a few more things

It all begins at 10 AM EST hosted by me. You can watch the livestream here

The whole point of the podcast is to increase traffic and revenue. If you like what you see share it on Palver, and facebook and all those other platforms I’m not on, consider subscribing to my youtube channel so I can get big enough for them to moniterize the channel so the left can complain and then censor me. …

…or you can just hit DaTipJar and cut out the middle man.

DaTechGuy off DaRadio Podcast 3 PM EST: Do all Lives Matter to UMass Lowell Nurses?

Today at 3 PM EST comes the lastest DaTechGuy off DaRadio Podcast livestream (right after rush). On our podcast today we will talk about:

  1. The firing of a tenured Dean at Umass Lowell Nursing department for stating in writing that all lives matter
  2. The Parable of the Woke Pharisee Protesters and the humble historian
  3. What we’ve learned over the last month
  4. What our new civil war will look like

We will discuss these things, and whatever else tickles my fancy at 3 PM EST. You can watch the podcast live here

Incidentally I’ve reached out to UMass Lowell for comment with a 2:30 deadline. They sent me this statement:

“Leslie Neal-Boylan’s employment at UMass Lowell ended on June 19, after she was informed she would no longer serve as dean of the Solomont School of Nursing. She had been in that role for 10 months. Although a tenured full faculty member, she declined to join the nursing faculty. As with all such employment decisions, it was made in the best interests of the university and its students. Although we are not able to discuss specifics of a personnel matter, it would be incorrect to assume any statement by Dr. Neal-Boylan was the cause of that decision.”

I followed up asking two questions:

  1. Is it the position of the Nursing Department of UMASS Lowell that all lives matter
  2. Are the nursing students being taught by the nursing department at UMASS Lowell that all lives in their care matter?

I’ll let you know if they answer before the show

DaTechguy Off DaRadio No Frills Podcast: Clueless in Seattle Edition 3 PM EST

the Datechguy off DaRadio No Frills Podcast ( a Laptop & a Mike) unrehearsed, unpredictable and unacceptable to the left, starts at 3 PM Right after Rush.

Today’s Topics

  1. Mayor Jenny Durkin and Governor Jay Inslee production of #CluelessInSeattle coming soon to a blue city near you.
  2. The cost of #DefundThePolice / #AbolishThePolice explained to grievance studies majors.
  3. Paulo from Brazil a contrast

And maybe we’ll take on some breaking news as it breaks if I think of it.

It all starts at 3 PM EST. You can watch the livestream here.

Hope you like it.

BTW if you want to know who Paulo is and see the video I shot today of him it’s here

Here is the same house two years ago when he started

FYI The purpose of the podcast is to increase traffic and to raise an extra $180 a month for some bills so if you like what you see, like the video, subscribe to the Youtube channel and if you really like it, consider hitting DaTipJar to get us to that $180 this month. Of course if you want to buy dafamily a Wizard of Oz Pinball machine from Jersey Jack Pinball company I won’t say no.

Higher Ed: Adapt or die

By Christopher Harper

Covid-19 may have created a perfect storm when it comes to higher education, creating an opportunity to take a good, hard look at a college education.

In the past 30 years, the cost of an undergraduate degree has tripled at public schools and more than doubled at private schools, adjusting for inflation. At a four-year, private institution, tuition and room and board averaged $46,950 in 2018. Four-year public colleges charged an average of $20,770 a year for tuition, fees, and room and board. For out-of-state students, the total went up to $36,420.

At roughly the same time, the Federal Reserve estimated that the cost of a college education increased eight times the percentage of wages.

Simply put, the ratio between the cost of a college education and a job is way out of balance.

That equation doesn’t take into account the massive debt that students have amassed as a result of the increased costs.

It’s worth noting that in Pennsylvania, which would be relatively representative of many states, the losses faced by universities have little to do with the classroom. Instead, the losses involve housing, sports, and conferences. Maybe universities should stick to the core mission of educating students and get out of these other businesses. See https://www.inquirer.com/education/coronavirus-stimulus-dollars-penn-state-temple-rutgers-rowan-st-joes-widener-cuts-money-20200420.html

What can be done about the cost of higher education?

The amount of money spent on faculty has decreased over the past few decades as universities hire more adjuncts who receive lower pay and often no benefits.

At the same time, the number of non-teaching personnel on campus, with several administrators at top universities making six-figure salaries with fringe benefits and secretarial support. About two-thirds of university budgets have nothing to do with teaching but instead go toward dormitories, facilities, marketing, and student health.

At Temple University in Philadelphia, where I teach, I have seen a vast expansion of vice deans, assistant deans, associate deans, directors, and assistants to the above over the past 15 years. I don’t know what many of them do, and none of them have visited my classroom.

Higher education will have to expand its offerings of online courses at reduced rates after students and their parents saw that classes could be delivered relatively effectively. That means that faculty will have to come to grips with providing online instruction.

The discussions I have had with faculty about online teaching remind me of my former colleagues in the news business who ignored the implications of the internet more than 20 years ago.

Simply put, colleges and universities must adapt or die.