Fall of Berlin Wall anniversary offers lessons for misguided millennials

Blogger next to Berlin Wall slab at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in 2018

By John Ruberry

Saturday was the thirtieth anniversary of one of the most profound events of the 20th century, the fall of the Berlin Wall. What began as a bureaucratic slip became a people power moment as oppressed East Germans stormed the wall checkpoints and with the help of West Berliners, literally began hacking away on what Winston Churchill called “the wall of shame.”

It was also a wall of failure. The smartest and most gifted people of communist East Germany were more likely to seek freedom and prosperity in the West. The brain drain threatened the stability of East Germany, so after receiving permission from his fellow dictator, the USSR’s Nikita Krushchev, Walter Ulbricht ordered construction of the wall in the summer of 1961.

Just a few days ago Dennis Prager explained on his show that there is a difference between a dictatorship and a totalitarian state. Augosto Pinochet’s Chile was a brutal nation in the 1970s, but if you didn’t like it, you could leave Chile. Not so in the USSR, until its final days, where my wife was born, or in the absurdly-named German Democratic Republic. East Germans who tried to escape to West Berlin would have to conquer not just the wall, but also beds of nails, attack dogs, and barbed wire, as well as avoid sharpshooters in watch towers. The number of people killed attempting to escape in the 28-year existence of the wall is disputed–about 200 is a common estimate.

Of growing up in the Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic, Mrs. Marathon Pundit told me this morning when I was discussing this post, “We were slaves, really.”

Meanwhile, a YouGov poll released last week shows that over one-third of millennials approve of communism, which betrays the failure of our schools and universities that seem much more interested promoting the 56 genders and waving their fingers at guys like me over “white privilege.” Oh, the founders of the communist movement, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels were white dudes. As were the earliest communists in power, Vladimir Lenin, Joseph Stalin, and Leon Trotsky. All five of them came from middle class or wealthy backgrounds. They had white privilege.

OK, millennials!

The lessons of the rise of Adolf Hitler and the evils of Nazism obviously should never be forgotten. But what is overlooked by schools and society are the murderous regimes of Stalin (20 million killed, maybe more), Mao Zedong (65 million killed, maybe more). and Cambodia’s Pol Pot (1.5 million killed and perhaps more, roughly 20 percent of that nation’s population).

Another 30th anniversary involving a repressive communist regime passed this summer–the Tianammen Square protests in China that ended in the slaughter of pro-democracy activists. For 24 straight weeks there have been pro-Democracy protests in Hong Kong. The more things change…

Ulbricht and his successors’ East Germany didn’t have the high death count, but it excelled in mental torture. Its KGB was the Ministry of State Security, commonly known as the Stasi, whose goal was to “know everything about everyone.” Two movies are essential viewing for millennials–actually for everyone–to learn more about East Germany. Both of them are available on Netflix, Karl Marx City, a documentary, and The Lives of Others, an Academy Award winner for Best International Feature Film. Fittingly, The Lives of Others is set in the year 1984.

Apologists for communism regularly point out that the reason these Marxist regimes failed is that the wrong people were in charge and “real communism” has never been tried. It is they who are wrong. People in power, for the most part, have one thing in common. They want even more power.

There are exceptions of course. King George III asked an American what George Washington would do now that he had defeated the British Empire. When told that the general would return to his farm, the king replied, “If he does that, he will be the greatest man in the world.”

Is that lesson being taught in many American schools? I doubt it.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Milo Counts

by baldilocks

The notorious Milo Yiannopoulos reviews Joker. I didn’t have plans to see the movie, and I’m still not sure if I will, but this excellently written piece definitely pushes me into the ‘probably’ category.

I have read a few dozen reviews of Joker by now. Not a single one is written as intelligently as the movie is, which is the opposite of how film coverage normally goes. At most publications, reviewing Joker has been farmed out to the junior women on staff. Perhaps the men are too overawed and incapacitated by it, like the rest of us, to dissemble.

More likely, their editors are up to something. I’ve been watching verified imbeciles sperg out about it for weeks. It hasn’t been an ordinary kind of sperg-out. When they hate something, but are not afraid of it, they go to war: You see op-eds, tweet storms, endless invective. But when our social justice overlords are truly, madly, uncontrollably terrified by something, they pretend to be bored by it. They affect indifference. Except, they do it in perfect unison—which is how you can tell it’s a lie.

Like masculinity itself, Joker is equal parts beautiful and terrifying. It is a warning about the consequences of a godless world of runaway capitalism and easy mood fixes. It is a movie about a society that has become corrupt and degenerate and turned in on itself, saturated with sex, pornography and prescription drugs. Young men have become completely dissociated from their own lives, and from any sense of worth. It is a society that many of us would recognize.

(…)

Symbologists will tell you that clowns point to the sacred, as fools and jesters point to the truth—obliquely, but with great force. Arthur Fleck is what happens when the disaffected male fails to find that higher calling and instead wallows in the destructive power of manhood, wrenching apart institutions and power structures for the sheer hell of it. But this is the future our rulers chose, by elevating the destructive forces of gender and race studies at the expense of beauty and truth. Joker is set at the exact time in history that these parasitic disciplines were taking over the academy and the sexual degeneracy of Foucault become normative for educated elites.

Read the whole thing.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng has been blogging since 2003 as baldilocks. Her older blog is here.  She published her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game in 2012.

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Fifty years ago: The Kinks release Arthur (or The Decline and Fall of the British Empire)

By John Ruberry

Fifty Octobers ago a brilliant musical work was released that Rolling Stone called, “By all odds the best British album of 1969,” adding, “It shows that Pete Townshend still has worlds to conquer, and that the Beatles have a lot of catching up to do.”

The Who issued Tommy that spring and the Beatles’ last recorded album, Abbey Road, was released in September.

What was that “best British album?” Arthur (or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) by the Kinks, written and produced by Ray Davies.

To celebrate, the Kinks, who broke up in 1996, but the surviving original members appear to have re-formed, last week released a twelve disc vinyl collector’s edition filled with remixes, demos, mono versions, new songs, and a never-released Dave Davies solo album.

There’s shorter version also available too. On Friday I downloaded the 1 hour 22 minute edition on Apple Music, with mono versions (why?), some alternative cuts, and one new song, “The Future,” credited to Arthur and the Emigrants (with Ray Davies).

Arthur is a great as I remembered. But the album was released at a troubled time for the Kinks. Fed up with the band’s lack of success, bassist Peter Quaife left. In 1965 the Kinks were banned by performing in the United States by the American Federation of Musicians. The ban, which to this date was never explained, was lifted in 1969, but much had changed by the end of the 1960s. The Who, the Rolling Stones, and the Beatles had expanded their fan base–it was always large for the Beatles–and they also expanded the breadth of their music.

Meanwhile, the Kinks were in a way marooned in England. Like children forbidden by their parents from playing outside after a blizzard and the usual resultant bitter cold temperatures, Ray Davies and the Kinks were locked inside and forced to rely on what they could find at home musically to entertain themselves. Much of their mid-1960s output owed much to British Musical Hall, the tunes of their parents. Music Hall in Britain is what Vaudeville was to America, only it spawned a distinct musical style that centered on spirited singing and catchy melodies that begged for sing-alongs. Famous, or used-to-be famous Music Hall songs include “Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay,” “Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag,” and “I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am.” That last one was a 1960s hit for Herman’s Hermits. That band scored another hit with “Dandy,” a Kinks song.

The Kinks first American hit was “You Really Got Me” in 1964, that tune and similar early Kinks aural assaults inspired two genres, punk rock and heavy metal. In 1967, the Music Hall-inspired “Mr. Pleasant” was the last Kinks single to break the Billboard Hot 100 until “Victoria,” the opening track of Arthur.

The Kinks clearly were back as hard rockers with “Victoria,” but there are still are Music Hall influences on Arthur. This is a concept album meant to be the soundtrack to a television play that never aired. Even in success they failed. When introducing a song on their last album, the (mostly) live To The Bone, Ray laments, “It kind of summarizes everything we’re about, the Kinks. Because everyone is expecting us to do wonderful things and we mess it all up, usually.”

The Arthur narrative centers on an elderly English suburbanite who symbolizes the disappointment that in 1969, Britain was not a classless society, as was hoped for after World War II ended.

From the album’s liner notes (courtesy of the Kinda Kinks site):

Arthur? Oh, of course–England and knights and round tables, Excalibur, Camelot, “So all day long the noise of battle roll’d among the mountains by the winter sea.” Sorry, no. This is Arthur Morgan, who lives in a London suburb in a house called Shangri-La, with a garden and a car and a wife called Rose and a son called Derek who’s married to Liz, and they have these two very nice kids, Terry and Marilyn. Derek and Liz and Terry and Marilyn are emigrating to Australia. Arthur did have another son, called Eddie. He was named for Arthur’s brother, who was killed in the battle of the Somme. Arthur’s Eddie was killed, too–in Korea. His son, Ronnie, is a student and he thinks the world’s got to change one hell of a lot before it’s going to be good enough for him. Derek thinks it’s changed a bloody sight too much–he can’t stand England any more, all these bloody bureaucrats everywhere, bloody hell, he’s getting out. Ronnie and Derek don’t exactly get on.

Families split along political lines? You mean like now? Brexit versus EU? Donald Trump versus Elizabeth Warren?

Derek and family’s move to Australia mirrors the Davies’ sister Rosie and her husband, Arthur, relocation to Down Under a few years earlier, which inspired the 1966 Kinks’ song, “Rosie Won’t You Please Come Home.” That tune, as with many Kinks songs, is also a story. While watching Ken Burns’ Country Music series on PBS, one of the commentators mentioned that many of the greatest country songs involve stories, sometimes dramas. Which deep down is why I love the work of the Kinks. Their music is compelling. The tales they tell even more so.

One story from Arthur, a Music Hall romp, is “She Bought a Hat Like Princess Marina.”

She’s bought a hat like Princess Marina’s
To wear at all her social affairs
She wears it when she’s cleaning the windows
She wears it when she’s scrubbing the stairs
But you will never see her at Ascot
She can’t afford the time or the fare
But she’s bought a hat like Princess Marina’s
So she don’t care.

He’s bought a hat like Anthony Eden’s
Because it makes him feel like a Lord
But he can’t afford a Rolls or a Bentley
He has to buy a secondhand Ford
He tries to feed his wife and his family
And buy them clothes and shoes they can wear
But he’s bought a hat like Anthony Eden’s
So he don’t care.

The saddest song I know of, from anyone, is another story from Arthur, “Some Mother’s Son.”

Two soldiers fighting in a trench
One soldier glances up to see the sun
And dreams of games he played when he was young
And then his friend calls out his name
It stops his dream and as he turns his head
A second later he is dead.

Some mother’s son lies in a field
Back home they put his picture in a frame
But all dead soldiers look the same
While all the parents stand and wait
To meet their children coming home from school
Some mother’s son is lying dead.

The music on Arthur rises to the occasion too. Unlike many late 1960s efforts, the horns compliment, not dominate, the songs. And the Kinks, led by lead guitarist Dave Davies, are at the top of their instrumental game here.

Arthur was not a hit but it enjoyed modest sales, unlike its pastoral predecessor The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society, which wasn’t able to crack Billboard’s Hot 200 Albums chart. The stage was set for the Kinks’ return to well-deserved prominence one year later with Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One. That album of course contained “Lola,” their biggest American hit since 1965’s “Tired of Waiting for You.”

The Kinks were back.

But then it was time to “mess it all up” again. There wasn’t a Part Two of the Lola album. The next year the Kinks released a country rock collection, Muswell Hillbillies which began another decline in popularity. Only this time their time in the wilderness would last much longer.

Oh, one more item. After 50 years, the play Arthur (or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire will finally be performed. That will happen later this year on BBC Radio.

God Save The Kinks!

John Ruberry blogs at Marathon Pundit.

Sodom and Gomorrah 1962 Where’s the Sodomy?

Today I watched the 1962 Movie Sodom & Gomorrah staring Stewart Granger, Pier Angeli and Stanley Baker and noticed something that was rather amazing to me.

The movie is pretty good, a great battle scene a few excellent subplots and as you might guess a big finish. As as you might guess there are some liberties taken, the famous exchange between Abraham and God becomes an exchange between the imprisoned Lot and the two angels. Instead of only Lot and his daughters hundreds of Hebrews escape with him. This type of thing is not much of a surprise but there is one big thing missing.

There is plenty of licentiousness, torture, fornication and even a hint of lesbianism, but not a hint of the one thing that Sodom is known for: Sodomy.

Now in fairness this movie was made in 1962 and I would not expect a biblical epic of the time to do a whole lot with the subject, but just as the lesbianism was implied in the form of the queen and her “favorites” you might have thought at a movie about the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah would at least give the slightest him of what was going on in there.

And of course the movie ended with Lot’s wife (a 2nd wife who was once of Sodom) turned to salt for looking back and no hint that the next event in the bible was his two daughters getting him dead drunk and sleeping with him because there was in their mind no prospect of any other men around. Of course with hundreds of men escaping that whole rationale is out the window.

Now in an age when the Bible was itself still well known perhaps it wasn’t considered necessary to bother with this stuff, it was only a movie and people understood that liberties might be taken.

But if it was me, if I was going to make a movie like there would be at least some hint as to the sin that destroyed Sodom

Given the history of the next 60 years I think such a warning might have been worthwhile.

Five Movie/TV Thoughts: Blazing Saddles, Bond, Big Bang & Brian (Plus Tom Brady) Under the Fedora

When you work a repetitive job that doesn’t require a lot of mind, you have time to pray your rosary and occasionally have ideas for post pop into your head, you also get weird and silly things running through your head like this:

This scene from Blazing Saddles was in my mind lately:

It’s not a well known but a “do da day” is 21.779 hours long that’s why it’s much easier to do things “all the do da day”. I think it would be a lot of fun to put a bunch of college snowflakes in an auditorium and watch them go doing their best to hold back laughing while pretending to be “triggered”. Of course a few true believers would in fact be outraged.

Such people should be laughed at.


In the Big Bang Theory, Howard is supposedly a lapsed jew and Bernadette is supposedly a good Catholic Girl, does that mean their children were baptized? Was their wedding blessed or “Jewish” & “Catholic” just a word to be thrown out for a joke?


For some reason this scene from the Classic Bond Movie “The Man With the Golden Gun” came into my mind this week

That’s Clifton Webb as Louisianan Sheriff JW Pepper who Bond (Roger Moore) met in the previous movie “Live and Let Die” He might be there for comic relief but if you think about it this guy is actually pretty brave.

He suddenly finds himself, while on vacation, in a high speed car chase with a man he knows is a secret agent (what he’s doing shopping for cars half a world away is another question) and how does he react?

Does he insist on being let out, does he call for help. Nope, he goes all in. It’s true that he doesn’t know that the man he is now helping to chase can kill him with one shot and I suspect he wouldn’t have cared if he did. As far as he’s concerned the cold war is on, Bond is on our side and he’s ready to lay it all out there.


For some reason Siskel & Ebert has been coming up in my Youtube suggestions and I dug up an old review of theirs of Monty Python and the Life of Brian:

I watched them for a lot of years and preferred the old “Sneak Previews” vs the syndicated “At the Movies” and this is the only time I remember both of them laughing out loud at a scene in a movie.


Finally I know this doesn’t go here but if you, unlike me, subscribe to the idea that Tom Brady is leaving NE look for a team that has two things

  1. a great receiving corps
  2. An impenetrable offensive line

Brady has all the money he will ever need and if anyone thinks he is leaving New England for any time that doesn’t provide a group of people who can catch the ball along with a group of people who are going to keep him from getting killed, you’re out of your mind.

Me I think he stays in NE after winning the Superbowl this year to try to get a ring for every single finger. I suspect eight will be enough.

Review: Season 5 of Peaky Blinders

By John Ruberry

Earlier this month Season 5 of Peaky Blinders arrived on Netflix. If you haven’t heard of the BBC show, it centers on a Gypsy organized crime gang from Birmingham, England.

The Peaky Blinders are named for the razor blades the actual hoodlums,-they were an 1890s gang–wore in their flat caps.

The television Peaky Blinders, who usually refer to themselves as the Shelby Company, Ltd., are led by Thomas “Tommy” Shelby (Cillian Murphy), a World War I veteran. The first season takes place in 1919, Season 5 begins in the auspicious year of 1929.

Tommy, at the end of Season 4, is elected to Parliament as a member of the Labour Party.

A new season of course brings a new primary villain, this time it’s Sir Oswald Mosley (Sam Claflin), a minor member of the British nobility who also sits in the House of Commons. If you are American, it’s likely that you’ve never heard of Mosley, but he’s one of the most notorious figures of 20th century Great Britain. He didn’t go as far as Benedict Arnold did during the American Revolution, but had the Nazis defeated Britain in World War II, it’s probable that Mosley would have been prime minister—with Edward VIII restored to the throne. A 2005 poll of British historians determined that Mosley was the Worst Briton of the 20th century. Jack the Ripper took the title for the 19th. Mosley not surprisingly was a virulent anti-Semite.

Sir Oswald pursues Tommy as an ally while Winston Churchill (Neil Maskew) does the same. Maskew is the third actor to portray Churchill in this series. What’s up with that?

The Black Tuesday Wall Street Crash puts pressure on the rest of the Blinders, particularly Michael Gray (Finn Cole), who in the first episode of the season awakens from a stupor in Detroit to learn that the Shelby Company money he invested in America has evaporated. He wants a bigger say in the family business, as does his American wife (Anya Taylor-Joy). The family matriarch, Polly Gray (Helen McCrory), Michael’s mother, continues to struggle to keep the family from tearing itself apart, and their battles now directly effect her lover, Aberama Gold (Aidan Gillen). Tommy’s older brother, Arthur, continues to battle his “animal inside me.” While Tommy and Mosley, politically speaking, court each other, the Peaky Blinders face a new foe, the Billy Boys, a Scottish Protestant gang, who joyously sing their fight song, which is based on the melody of “Marching Through Georgia.” The Billy Boys hate Gypsies and Catholics–the Shelbys are both.

Peaky Blinders has always played loose with history. Lighten up, though, it’s fiction!

On the other hand…

As 1929 winds down, Mosely announces the formation of a new political party, the British Union of Fascists. But after leaving Labour, the real Mosley first formed another new party, called, well, the New Party. After that came his fascist party. I bring this up because in his introductory speech as leader of the BUF, Mosley, complaining about Indian competition forcing the closing of British textile mills, sounds a bit like Donald Trump, with a dash of UK Independence Party founder Nigel Farage thrown in. I’m not a fan of historical parallels with the present, particularly when it comes to individuals. And I get it, many people believe in “Orange Man Bad.” But sheesh, can TV scriptwriters give us a break from that for once?

I see Season 5, quality wise, as a step back for Peaky Blinders, but better than the Russian sinkhole two seasons back. But a Season 6 apparently is in the works, and maybe even a seventh. And perhaps we will see a couple of other men portray Churchill. The 1930s offers many plotlines as the world marches again to war. Still, even a below-par Peaky Blinders is worth your time.

Peaky Blinders is rated MA. It contains graphic violence, drug use, and overt sexual activity.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

9% vs 72% or why I don’t fear the MSM

Over at Nerdrotic they have a video about the reviews of the new extremely woke Batwoman.

Now the 9% fan reviews which during the video shoot actually dropped to 8% is very telling when compared to the critics who loved it.

Now of course the professional critics live in a bubble world where if you do not use the right pronouns they are out because it’s not hard to find someone to type something for money so the line that has to be followed will be, but real people in the real world don’t have that problem so the end result with be a show with bad ratings and either very targeted ad revenue or a dumping ground for compensation spots.

I suspect that despite this it will get a second season because like Doctor Who which has taken a year off, it will be considered “too woke to fail” or to be allowed to be seen as failing.

And that brings us to the whole “impeachment” business.

It’s already been noted that we are seeing skewed polling with samples designed to produce the “evidence” to justify the desired meme but unfortunately for the media they have not quite caught on to the fact that their access to the general public is no longer exclusive and that no amount of astroturf in town halls are going to convince real people to doubt the evidence of their own eyes, a fact that some of them have figured out:

The problem is, that room is not representative of the majority of America. Yes, attitudes towards LGBTQ people have improved remarkably in recent years. But just as in 2016, the general election could very well come down to a handful of moderate districts in swing states, places where nonbinary driver’s licenses and teaching gender identity in schools (both of which candidates endorsed last night) are going to resonate a hell of a lot less than Donald Trump screaming about his record on jobs.


It’s a real problem: To garner media attention and win the primary, the candidates need to be beyond progressive on all the issues. But to win the general, they’re going to need to be a little more moderate—or at least talk less about identity and more about the issues that affect everyone in America: things like jobs, healthcare, taxes, infrastructure, and retirement.

emphasis mine

And consider that wasn’t written by someone like me, it was written by someone who actually believes in all this crap but understands that it can’t be sold to people who live outside of their bubble, not that people outside of the bubble are actually watching CNN, but she understands that these town halls are ready made Trump ads made to order.

We’re seeing the same thing with impeachment, you don’t have to skew pols when the numbers actually are going your way and no matter how many time the MSM and even now Drudge claims that impeachment “furor grows” the reality, even in a place like the woke Massachusetts I live it, nobody is talking about it outside of the media, the various activists and the like

That’s why I’m not greatly worried about what is coming, because I understand that the future belongs to those who show up and that while I’m not big on Dawinism as a whole I AM big on the idea of natural selection and Mark Steyn’s maxim that the future belongs to those who show up. Yeah woke la la lands like Massachusetts are going to get a lot worse before they get better but as a state we are marginalizing ourselves to the point where in the scheme of things we increasingly don’t matter. This is due to one basic thing about reality

Reality doesn’t care how woke you are, reality is and despite all attempts to warp it, reality in the end, whether we are talking about always asserts itself.

Buttigieg on Scripture, The Chappelle add on, Rabbits Farmers Chanel Captain’s Courageous, Chick-Fil-A wins again, Maybe they’re all lunch? Under the Fedora

I have to disagree with this argument at PJ media on Pete Buttigieg on scripture. I think he understands scripture just as I think Andrew Sullivan understands scripture and Fr. James Martin does and the idea is the same.

He wants to remake scripture in general and God in particular in his own image in order to redefine sin because as I can tell you from personal experience it’s a hell of a lot easier to redefine sin to meet your behavior that to change your behavior to avoid sin.


One interesting thing about the Dave Chappelle special on Netflix is that there is a 2nd special that emphasis his close relationship with liberal icons.

Don’t think for one moment that it wasn’t included as insurance against cancel culture.

Didn’t work though.


I confess took too much pleasure from this story of a bunch of vegans getting beaten up by rabbit farmers when they tried to storm their locations and set their livestock free.

All I could think of was the famous scene from the Spencer Tracy move Captain’s Courageous that I’ve written about before when the wealthy brat whose been recused from the passenger liner that he fell overboard from keep disrupting the fishing schooner he’s on.

 Troop finally concludes: “I guess there’s nothing left for it.” He rears back and gives Harvey a slap that knocks him flat. Harvey for perhaps for the first time in his life doesn’t know what to say:
You HIT me!
“Now you just sit there and think about it.”
It is here, with the establishment of discipline, that the movie begins to shift.

I suggest those vegans just sit there and think about it.


When will the left learn that no matter how loud they are they aren’t going to change the fact that the number of people who like the taste of Chick-fil-a vastly outnumber the woke who show up for die ins?

Each one of these protests get a lot of media but it keeps getting bigger and bigger. But there’s STILL not one in Fitchburg!


Finally speaking of food something just struck me about this story concerning an academic who suggests we can save the planet by eating each other (in a non-sexual way of course).

For several years we have been teasing the least about all the people who have supposedly died from Donald Trump’s tax cuts, his dropping out of the Paris accords, his court appointments etc etc etc and have sarcastically asked, if all these people have been killed by Trump where are the bodies?

Now we know.

Five Twitter thoughts: Mugabe vs Washington, NFL & Business, NYT vs Trump, Death Benefits and Hyman Roth on a Philly Shooting Under Da Fedora

Less that an hour ago I wrote a post on writers block and now after a few minutes of Twitter I’m brimming with idea but have no time to write a long post so here are a few twitter thoughts under my fedora.


It can not be overstated how lucky we were in our founding fathers.


It’s supply and demand, as long as there is a credible replacement for you at a position as a player you are expendable, particularly if you choose to make a fool out of yourself.


Filed under “least surprising story of the day”


Dead men don’t collect benefits. Maybe all those deaths are factored into the Bernie plan?


Or as John Wayne put it in Cahill US Marshall: “If you don’t like the treatment don’t rob the banks.”


The Critics vs Reality Chappelle/Nerdrotic edition

I was planning a piece on the difference between the critics and the people in the reaction to the Dave Chappelle special, but the good folks at Nerdrotic.com beat me to it

I can’t put it better than that but let me remind you that these are the same type of people who keep telling us that Trump is doomed.