Body cams for voting officials

Granted, your average voting official doesn’t look as good as this dude, but he’s also wearing a camera that is NDAA-approved, without parts made in China

Technology was supposed to make our lives easier and safer, yet as we speak, we’re watching massive voter fraud on a scale not seen since the Soviet Union. It’s impossible to “trust the process” when voting machines magically gltich change votes from one candidate to another and vote counting happens at night without oversight. When the dust settles from this election, there is going to be a lack of trust on all sides for the process.

We need a way to start re-establishing that trust, and I think a smart move would be body cameras for voting officials. When body cameras first started appearing for police officers, there were mixed reviews and a lot of apprehension, but ultimately it was a good thing. My Cub Scout Pack visited the nearby police station, where one of the officers showed us her body camera system. I asked for her opinion, and she said she preferred them, because when people treated her poorly, spit at her and clawed at her face, it was captured on camera for a judge. Without body cameras, we wouldn’t be able to expose when police behave poorly, which helps weed out or correct poor performing officers and improves police performance overall.

So, why not for voting officials? Body cameras are significantly harder to change data. Police systems have encryption and protections to tag data if someone attempts to alter it. Time stamps would make it obvious if votes were counted after hours. Analytics on the camera system can identify and flag behaviors that would be suspicious.

Do we really want this again?

Instead of having officials board up windows, count in the night and treat voting like they’re some sort of mafia organization, let’s bring some transparency to the process with proven technology. If its good enough for the police, it should be good enough for voting officials.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the Department of Defense, Department of the Navy, or any other government agency.