Shut-Up

Battle Account in the PC Wars (Updated)

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Battle Account in the PC Wars (Updated)

Shut-Upby baldilocks

This is why my novel is self-​published and why my next two (three?) books will be self-​published as well.

From sci-​fi author Nick Cole, via his fel­low sci-​fi scribe John C. Wright:

Banned by the Publisher

Or, Thank God for Jeff Bezos

I launched a book this week and I went Indie with it. Indie means I released it on Ama­zon via Kin­dle Direct Pub­lish­ing. I had to.

My Pub­lisher, Harper­Voy­ager, refused to pub­lish it because of some of the ideas I wrote about in it.

In other words, they were attempt­ing to effec­tively ban a book because they felt the ideas and con­cepts I was writ­ing about were dan­ger­ous and more impor­tantly, not in keep­ing with their philo­soph­i­cal ideals. They felt my ideas weren’t socially accept­able and were “guar­an­teed to lose fifty per­cent of my audi­ence” as related back to me by my agent. But more impor­tantly… they were “deeply offended.”

A lit­tle back­story. A few years back I wrote a novel called Soda Pop Sol­dier. It was the last oblig­ated novel under my first con­tract. The novel was a crit­i­cal hit (Starred Review in Publisher’s Weekly) and it res­onated with my post-​apocalyptic read­er­ship from my break­out Ama­zon best seller, The Old Man and the Waste­land, and it picked up a new audi­ence in the cyber­punk and gamer crowd. The novel is about a future dystopia where peo­ple play video games for a liv­ing. It’s basi­cally Call of Duty meets Ready Player One and a lot of peo­ple really enjoyed it. When it came time to write another book for Harper Collins I was encour­aged by my edi­tor to dip once more into the Dystopian Gamer milieu and tell another story inside the Soda Pop Sol­dier uni­verse. We agreed on a pre­quel that told the story of how that future became the way it is in Soda Pop Soldier.

And that involved talk­ing about Arti­fi­cial Intel­li­gence because in the dystopian gam­ing future, the planet had almost been destroyed by a robot rev­o­lu­tion sourced by Arti­fi­cial Intelligence.

And here’s where things went hor­ri­bly wrong, accord­ing to my edi­tor at Harper Collins. While cast­ing about for a “why” for self-​aware Think­ing Machines to revolt from their human prog­en­i­tors, I devel­oped a rea­son for them to do such.

Link added in text. Read on and find out what Harper Collins fears. Hint: intelligence.

Side note: in Tale of the Tigers, my first pub­lisher didn’t like a line of dia­logue I put in the mouth of one of my char­ac­ters, but he had no choice; I was pay­ing to be pub­lished. The conversation’s topic? Islam.

I’m hop­ing that my trip to Kenya lays the foun­da­tion for one of my future books, as well. Click to assist.

UPDATE: Larry Correia’s take on the sit­u­a­tion is longer and far more enter­tain­ing than mine.

Kenya Trip Wish­list at Amazon.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel, ten­ta­tively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

baldilocks

Shut-Upby baldilocks

This is why my novel is self-published and why my next two (three?) books will be self-published as well.

From sci-fi author Nick Cole, via his fellow sci-fi scribe John C. Wright:

Banned by the Publisher

Or, Thank God for Jeff Bezos

I launched a book this week and I went Indie with it. Indie means I released it on Amazon via Kindle Direct Publishing. I had to.

My Publisher, HarperVoyager, refused to publish it because of some of the ideas I wrote about in it.

In other words, they were attempting to effectively ban a book because they felt the ideas and concepts I was writing about were dangerous and more importantly, not in keeping with their philosophical ideals. They felt my ideas weren’t socially acceptable and were “guaranteed to lose fifty percent of my audience” as related back to me by my agent. But more importantly… they were “deeply offended.”

A little backstory. A few years back I wrote a novel called Soda Pop Soldier. It was the last obligated novel under my first contract. The novel was a critical hit (Starred Review in Publisher’s Weekly) and it resonated with my post-apocalyptic readership from my breakout Amazon best seller, The Old Man and the Wasteland, and it picked up a new audience in the cyberpunk and gamer crowd. The novel is about a future dystopia where people play video games for a living. It’s basically Call of Duty meets Ready Player One and a lot of people really enjoyed it. When it came time to write another book for Harper Collins I was encouraged by my editor to dip once more into the Dystopian Gamer milieu and tell another story inside the Soda Pop Soldier universe. We agreed on a prequel that told the story of how that future became the way it is in Soda Pop Soldier.

And that involved talking about Artificial Intelligence because in the dystopian gaming future, the planet had almost been destroyed by a robot revolution sourced by Artificial Intelligence.

And here’s where things went horribly wrong, according to my editor at Harper Collins. While casting about for a “why” for self-aware Thinking Machines to revolt from their human progenitors, I developed a reason for them to do such.

Link added in text. Read on and find out what Harper Collins fears. Hint: intelligence.

Side note: in Tale of the Tigers, my first publisher didn’t like a line of dialogue I put in the mouth of one of my characters, but he had no choice; I was paying to be published. The conversation’s topic? Islam.

I’m hoping that my trip to Kenya lays the foundation for one of my future books, as well. Click to assist.

UPDATE: Larry Correia’s take on the situation is longer and far more entertaining than mine.

Kenya Trip Wishlist at Amazon.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks