Readability

Istanbul and Our Perceptions

[cap­tion id=“attachment_84436” align=“aligncenter” width=“300”]istanbul-overview-sunset-large Istan­bul Old Quar­ter. From the Tele­graph (UK)[/caption]

by baldilocks

I was going to write about my progress with my sec­ond novel and my two books — one about Kenya. But this hap­pened today in Istanbul.

A gun and sui­cide bomb attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk inter­na­tional air­port has killed at least 28 peo­ple and injured up to 60.

Up to three attack­ers were involved, with one report­edly open­ing fire with a Kalash­nikov as they tar­geted an entry point to the terminal.

Recent bomb­ings in Turkey have been linked to either Kur­dish sep­a­ratists or the so-​called Islamic State group.

This looks like a major, co-​ordinated assault, the BBC’s Mark Lowen reports.

This morn­ing, I read a piece on the killing of Mohamed Dulya­dayn via U.S. air strike. Dulya­dayn was the mas­ter­mind of the 2015 mas­sacre at Garissa Uni­ver­sity in Kenya—a Chris­t­ian uni­ver­sity – where 148 stu­dents and pro­fes­sors were mur­dered. Dulya­dayn was one of the lead­ers of al-​Shabaab, the regional Islamic ter­ror group.

This morn­ing, just now and many times in the past, it has occurred to me that the West doesn’t pay that much atten­tion to Islamic ter­ror strikes when they occur in areas per­ceived to be Islamic, even though the body count is often much higher than in per­ceived non-​Islamic areas — Paris and New York City notwithstanding.

As I’ve pointed out many times, Kenya is pri­mar­ily a Chris­t­ian nation, but because it is in Africa, where Islam had nearly free rein until the begin­ning of the Euro­pean colo­nial era at the end of the 19th cen­tury and because Kenya has been at war with neigh­bor­ing Soma­lia, ter­ror attacks there seem com­mon to the West­ern eye.

And, of course, Istan­bul is the largest city in Islamic Turkey.

My obser­va­tion is not a crit­i­cism. What it is intended to do is to point to some­thing deeper: that we expect Mus­lims to mur­der peo­ple, even their co-​religionists. So when they act up in a place where they are highly con­cen­trated, it’s hor­ri­fy­ing, but there isn’t as much out­rage as when they shoot up a pub­lic ben­e­fits cen­ter in San Bernardino or a gay night­club in Orlando.

Does that say some­thing about us or about them?

Answer: yes.

RIP, Istan­bul victims.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!baldilocks

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

istanbul-overview-sunset-large
Istanbul Old Quarter. From the Telegraph (UK)

by baldilocks

I was going to write about my progress with my second novel and my two books—one about Kenya. But this happened today in Istanbul.

A gun and suicide bomb attack on Istanbul’s Ataturk international airport has killed at least 28 people and injured up to 60.

Up to three attackers were involved, with one reportedly opening fire with a Kalashnikov as they targeted an entry point to the terminal.

Recent bombings in Turkey have been linked to either Kurdish separatists or the so-called Islamic State group.

This looks like a major, co-ordinated assault, the BBC’s Mark Lowen reports.

This morning, I read a piece on the killing of Mohamed Dulyadayn via U.S. air strike. Dulyadayn was the mastermind of the 2015 massacre at Garissa University in Kenya—a Christian university–where 148 students and professors were murdered. Dulyadayn was one of the leaders of al-Shabaab, the regional Islamic terror group.

This morning, just now and many times in the past, it has occurred to me that the West doesn’t pay that much attention to Islamic terror strikes when they occur in areas perceived to be Islamic, even though the body count is often much higher than in perceived non-Islamic areas—Paris and New York City notwithstanding.

As I’ve pointed out many times, Kenya is primarily a Christian nation, but because it is in Africa, where Islam had nearly free rein until the beginning of the European colonial era at the end of the 19th century and because Kenya has been at war with neighboring Somalia, terror attacks there seem common to the Western eye.

And, of course, Istanbul is the largest city in Islamic Turkey.

My observation is not a criticism. What it is intended to do is to point to something deeper: that we expect Muslims to murder people, even their co-religionists. So when they act up in a place where they are highly concentrated, it’s horrifying, but there isn’t as much outrage as when they shoot up a public benefits center in San Bernardino or a gay nightclub in Orlando.

Does that say something about us or about them?

Answer: yes.

RIP, Istanbul victims.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!baldilocks

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>